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TOWNS, VILLAGES AND SETTLEMENTS
A-F

A

            ADAMS COVE.  Pop. 233. Fishing settlement on the North Shore of Conception B. 85 m. by highway from St. John’s, 11 from Carbonear.

 

            ADEYTON. Pop. 38. Lumbering settlement at S.E. corner of Random, N.W. Arm, Trinity Bay.

 

            ADMIRAL’S BEACH.  Pop. 31. Fishing settlement a few miles north of St. Mary’s, and inside of Great Colinet Island, St. Mary’s B.

 

            ADMIRAL’S COVE.  Pop. 143. A very ancient fishing settlement just inside the entrance to Fermuse B. on the Southern Shore. First settled probably in the very early 16th century. Birthplace of Richard Brothers, the mad prophet, celebrated among his followers in England and elsewhere as “Prince of the Hebrews, Nephew of the Almighty,” 1757-1824. 57 m. by highway from St. John’s. LT.

 

            AGUATHUNA.  Pop. 76. A small industrial settlement on the isthmus of the Port au Port peninsula, on the West Coast, where the Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation quarries limestone for its blast furnaces in Sydney, Nova Scotia. 18 m. by road from Stephenville Crossing, which is on the main line of railway, and 452 m. from St. John’s and 95 m. from Port aux Basques. Dr. Brendan O’Neill, M.H.O. 26 radios. PT.

 

            ALLAN’S ISLAND.  Pop. 303. Fishing settlement on the southern end of the Burin Peninsula, off Lamaline. PO.

 

            ALLATOK BAY. Pop. 27. Furring settlement in the vicinity of Cape Harrison, Labrador.

 

            AMHERST COVE.  Pop. 300. Three fishing settlements in Bonavista B. South, above Bonavista S Upper, 191; Middle, 50; Lower, 59. LT.

 

            ANCHOR POINT.  Pop. 120. A fishing settlement on the St. Barbe coast. The northern tip of B. St. Barbe. LT.

 

            ANDERSON’S COVE.  Pop. 111. Fishing settlement at the entrance to Mall B., at the central head of Fortune B. PO.

 

            ANGEL’S COVE.  Pop. 74. Fishing settlement of the west side of Placentia B., on the Cape St. Mary’s shore. 106 m. by highway from St. John’s.

 

            ANGLE BROOK. Pop. 53. Logging settlement at the head of Bonavista B., near Glovertown.

 

            APSEY BROOK.  Pop. 36. Fishing settlement on the south side of Smith’s Sound, west of Petley, Trinity B. North.

 

            AQUAFORTE.  Pop. 176. An ancient fjord-like fishing settlement on the Southern Shore. First settled probably in the early 17th century. 52 m. by highway from St. John’s. Timbers of a pirate ship which ran ashore 2 centuries ago still to be seen on the bottom. Home of late H.C. Winsor, after whom the city of Winsor in S. Africa, whither he removed, is named. 2 radios. PO.

 

            ARGENTIA. Pop. 477. An ancient settlement founded about the same time as Placentia, before 1662. Formerly a fishing settlement, now terminus for Placentia B. and S.W. Coast steamships, and for he Placentia branch railway. Herring manufacturing plant located here. 82 m. by rail from St. John’s. Cottage Hospital. Dr. John Green, M.H.O. 41 radios. PT. Argentia is no being made into an American naval military air base.

 

            ARNOLD’S COVE.  Pop. 174. Fishing-lobstering settlement at the N.E. head of Placentia B. 1 radio, 1 sawmill.

 

            ASPEN COVE.  Pop. 106. Fishing settlement on the mainland of Fogo Dist., between Ladle Cove and Carmanville.

 

            AVALON PENINSULA.  Pop. 125,849. All the area east of the isthmus which separates Placentia and Trinity Bays. This is the oldest part of Newfoundland. The name was given by Sir George Calvert (1st Lord Baltimore) to the land granted him in Newfoundland by Royal Patent in 1621.

 

            AVONDALE. Pop. 601. Situated at the head of Conception B., this pretty settlement was formerly an inshore and Labrador fishing centre. Now mainly agricultural. From here and other nearby settlements many men have gone to U.S.A., and become structural steel workers. 36 m. by highway from St. John’s. 2 sawmills. Dr. Patk. O’Kelly, M.H.O. 31 radios. PT.

B

            BACALIEU.  Pop. 12. An island 2 to 3 m. off the headland of the Bay de Verde peninsula, from which it is separated by Bacalieu Tickle, a prolific fishing ground. Lighthouse.

            BACK COVE.  Pop. 59. Fishing settlement on the east side of White B., between Middle Arm and Western Arm.

 

            BACK HARBOR.  Pop. 235. A fishing settlement on Twillingate Island, about a mile from Twillingate settlement. First settled about 1700 by a planter named Moore. 232 m. from St. John’s; 102 from Lewisporte. Clyde.

 

            BACON COVE.  Pop. 156. Situated at the head of Conception B., formerly a fishing settlement, now mainly agricultural.

 

            BADGER.  Pop. 449. Situated inland on the main line of railway, this is the centre from which the Anglo-Newfoundland Development Co. of Grand Falls directs its pulpwood cutting and driving operations. 750 loggers are employed. 295 m. by rail from St. John’s; 253 from Port aux Basques. 2 sawmills. 58 radios. PT.

 

            BADGER’S QUAY.  Pop. 316. Inshore and Labrador fishing settlement on the north side of Bonavista B., beside Valleyfield. 183 m. from St. John’s. Sagona. Post. Sav. Bnk. 31 radios. PT.

 

            BAIE VERTE.  Pop. 27. (Pop. Figure refers to permanent residents). Important pulpwood cutting centre for the Bowater Corner Brook newsprint mill. 250 men employed winter 1939. Situated on the coast between Cape John and White B. between Pacquet and Fleur de Lys. 10 radios. 1 sawmill. PO.

 

            BAINE HR.  Pop. 180. Fishing settlement on west side of Placentia B. 75 m. from Argentia. Home. 7 radios. PT.

 

            BARENEED.  Pop. 216. An ancient fishing settlement on the Port de Grave peninsula, q.v.

 

            BAR HAVEN.  Pop. 204. Fishing settlement on the northern part of the west side of Placentia B. on Barren I. 91 m. from Argentia. Home. 3 radios. PO.

 

            BARGE BAY.  Pop. 35. Fishing settlement on the Labrador side of the Straits, opposite Cape Norman.

 

            BARR’D ISLANDS.  Pop. 471. A fishing settlement on Fogo island, almost contiguous to Joe Batt’s Arm. 334 m. from St. John’s. Sagona.

 

            BARTLETT’S HR.  Pp. 57. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the north shore of Bay St. John, on the St. Barbe coast. 733 m. from St. John’s, 181 from Humbermouth. Northern Ranger. PO.

 

 

            BARTON.  Pop. 27. Lumbering settlement on the north side of Smith’s Sound, Trinity B. North.

 

            BATEAU COVE.  Pop. 33. Fishing settlement near Lark Hr., B. of Islands.

 

            BATTEAU.  Pop. 63. A well-known Labrador fishing settlement between Venison Islands and Spotted Islands. 574 m. from St. John’s. Kyle.

 

            BATTLE HARBOR.  Pop. 233. An important settlement on the coast of Labrador. A Grenfell Hospital formerly operated here but now at St. Mary’s River, 9 m. distant. A small amateur radio broadcast station was operated here until the outbreak of the war of 1939. This is the most northerly port of call of the Northern Ranger, and of the Clarke Steamship tourist ships. 494 m. from St. John’s. Northern Ranger, Kyle, Clarke Steamship boats. 8 radios. PT.

 

            BAULINE.  Pop. 55. An ancient fishing settlement on the Southern Shore, just south of Tor’s Cove. In 1705 it had 3 homes. Old name: Bell Inn.

 

            BAULINE.  Pop. 263. A picturesque fishing settlement on the south side of Conception B., inside of Cape St. Francis. Settled about 1870 by people from Blackhead and Broad Cove, North Shore of Conception B. An important salmon catching centre, while codfish from here are the first to arrive each summer in the St. John’s market. 15 m. by highway from St. John’s. PO.

 

            BAY BULLS.  Pop. 808. An ancient fishing settlement on the Southern Shore. Old name: Bay of Bulls. First settled probably in the late 16th century, or even earlier. In 1677 it had 6 dwellings, 6 planters, 3 wives, 8 sons, 2 daughters, 57 fishery servants, 15 boats, 16 cattle, 5 sheep, 50 hogs, and produced 660 quintals of fish; in 1705 there were 20 houses and families. Frequently attacked and sacked by both Dutch and French invaders. The last place in Newfoundland to be attacked by an invader (the French) in 1796, when it was burnt don. Some old cannon are now used as gate-posts in front of the Roman Catholic Church. This settlement was headquarters for the Marine Biological Research and Fishery Station until fire destroyed the building in 1936. 20 m. by highway from St. John’s. 3 sawmills. 39 radios. PT.

 

            BAY D’EST.  Pop. 35. Fishing settlement on the east side of North B. of Bay D’Espoir.

 

            BAY DE L’EAU.  Pop. 45. Fishing settlement just east of English Hr. E., at the N.W. head of Fortune B.

 

            BAY DE L’EAU ISLAND.  Pop. 45. Fishing settlement in Great Bay D’Leau, which itself lies on the promontory separating Fortune B. and Hermitage B.

 

            BAY DE VERDE.  Pop. 823. An ancient fishing settlement near the north east tip of the peninsula of the same name. Old name: Bay de Vard, Bay de Vards, or sometimes Bay of Verds. The name means “Green Bay.” First settled in the early 17th century. In 1677 it had 8 dwellings, 8 planters, 4 wives, 2 sons, 9 daughters, 109 fishery servants, 20 boats, 1 sheep, 36 hogs, 11 gardens and produced 1700 quintals of fish. Destroyed by the French under D’Iberville, 1696-97. In 1705 it had 10 houses and families. This is a very picturesque settlement. 109 m. by highway from St. John’s, 37 from Carbonear. 32 radios. POMO.

 

            BAY DU NORD.  Pop. 188. Fishing settlement situated at the north-west head of Fortune B., into which Bay du Nord river empties. 230 m. from Argentia, 293 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo. 1 sawmill. 5 radios. PO.

 

            BAY L’ARGENT.  Pop. 298. Fishing settlement on the northern part of the west side of the Burin Peninsula. 179 m. from Argentia, 344 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo. Nursing Centre. 4 radios. PT.

 

            BAY ROBERTS.  Pop. 1911. This important Conception Bay settlement is notable for its Western Union cable station, and for the fact it is the home of a considerable number of Labrador-going fishermen. First settled probably in the early 17th century. In 1677 it had 2 dwellings, 2 planters, 1 wife, 5 sons, 1 daughter, 19 fishery servants, 6 boats, 34 cattle, 22 sheep, 13 hogs, 1 garden, and produced 400 quintals of fish. Birthplace of Samuel A. Mercer, one of the world’s greatest orientalists and linguists, Toronto University. Has an important wood-working factory; also a hockey and skating rink. Bank of Nova Scotia. “Bay Roberts Guardian” is published here. 57 m. by highway from St. John’s. 62 m. by rail from St. John’s. 2 sawmills. Dr. L.S. Pritchard, Dr. Howard Drover, M.H.O.’s. Post. Sav. Bank. 263 radios. PT.

 

            BEACHES.  Pop. 50. Lumbering settlement at the head of White B., beside Hampden.

 

            BEAR COVE.  Pop. 70. Fishing settlement on St. Barbe coast, near entrance to Straits of Belle Isle, south of Flower’s Cove.

 

            BEAR COVE.  Pop. 101. Fishing settlement on St. Barbe coast, north of Rocky Harbor.

 

            BEAU BOIS.  Pop. 45. Fishing settlement on west side of Placentia B., near entrance to Mortier B.

 

            BEAUMONT NORTH.  Pop. 152. Fishing-lumbering settlement on north coast of Long Island, N.E. of Little B. Islands, N.D.B. 1 radio. POMO.

 

            BEAVER COVE.  Pop. 26. Fishing settlement on the mainland between Rocky B. and Gander B., near Frederickton, Fogo Dist.

 

            BELLE ISLE, straits of belle Isle. This narrow stretch of water which separates northern Newfoundland from southern Labrador, and the island of the same name which lies within it.

 

            BELLDOWN’S POINT.  Pop. 25. Fishing settlement just north of Cow Head, on the St. Barbe coast.

 

            BELL ISLAND. Pop. 5490. Newfoundland’s fourth largest, oldest, and one of her largest industrial centres. Average of 2,500 men employed daily mining its red haematite iron ore, most of them residents on the Island, many being seasonal workers from various Conception Bay settlements. Mining began in 1895, since when 36,044,923 tons have been exported chiefly to Germany, Canada and Great Britain, worth approximately $72,000,000. Island is six miles long, an average of 2 miles wide, with an area of about thirteen square miles. Lies at the head of Conception B., 3 miles from Portugal Cove on the mainland, by which it is connected by a ferry steamer plying several times daily. The Island’s deposits of iron ore are estimated at3,635,543,369 tons, and are regarded as inexhaustible. In recent years technical improvements have been effected in the methods of mining and handling the ore. Bank of Nova Scotia. Has a hockey and skating rink. “The Bell Islander” is published here. Dr. J.B. Lynch, M.H.O. 788 radios. PT.

 

            BELLBURNS.  Pop. 89. Lumbering-fishing-lobstering settlement on St. Barbe coast. One of the most prosperous settlements on this coast. 4 sawmills. 2 radios. PO.

 

            BELLEORAM.  Pop. 753. Important fishing settlement on the west side of Fortune B. Bank fishery centre. Nursing Cent. 242 m. from Argentia, 281 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo. Bacalieu. Bank of Commerce. 34 radios. PT.

 

            BELLEVUE.  Pop. 187. Old name: Tickle Hr. Fishing settlement at head of Trinity B., on the Isthmus of Avalon, north of Thornlea. Salmon and trout are very plentiful. 3 sawmills. 12 radios. POMO.

 

            BELLMAN’S COVE.  Pop. 78. Fishing-lobstering settlement at the head of East Bay of the Port au Port peninsula, beside Aguathuna.

 

            BENOIT’S COVE.  Pop. 222. Logging-fishing settlement in Bay of Islands. 1 sawmill.

 

            BENTON.  Pop. 44. Logging centre on main railway, about halfway between Gambo and Glenwood. 7 radios. 204 m. by rail from St. John’s.

 

            BEST’S HR.  Pop. 139. Fishing-lobstering settlement on Ragged Islands, N.W. side of Merasheen Island, Placentia B. West.

 

            BIG HR. DEEP.  Pop. 196. Ancient name: Orange Bay, as seen on many old charts. Situated on the French Shore, near the north-west mouth of White B. 420 m. from St. John. Northern Ranger. 2 radios.

 

            BIRCHY BAY.  Pop. 259. Situated on the mainland of Twillingate Dist., south of Coal All Island. 1 sawmill. 3 radios. PO.

 

            BIRCHY COVE.  Pop. 88. Fishing settlement above Bonavista anc close to newman’s Cove, Bonavista S. 8 m. by road from Bonavista.

 

            BIRCHY HEAD.  Pop. 65. Settlement on the south arm of Bonne B. PO.

 

            BIRD COVE.  Pop. 95. Fishing-lobstering settlement south of Brig Bay on the St. Barbe coast.

 

            BISCAY BAY.  Pop. 58. Fishing settlement at the north-east head of Trepassey B. 1 sawmill.

 

            BISCAYAN COVE.  Pop. 74. Fishing settlement between Pouch Cove and Cape St. Francis. 18 m. from St. John’s.

 

            BISHOP’S COVE.  Pop. 74. Fishing settlement on the north side of Spaniard’s B., south of Upper Island Cove, in Conception B. 1 sawmill.

 

            BISHOP’S FALLS.  Pop. 1,882. Established a year or two before Grand Falls as a pulp-manufacturing centre by the Albert E. Read Co. Purchased 1923 by the Anglo-Newfoundland Development Co. of Grand Falls, which now uses all the output in its newsprint mill. Town, which is headquarters for the western division of the Newfoundland railway, lies on the main line. 267 m. by rail from St. John’s; 280 from Port aux Basques; 12 by rail from Grand Falls; 10 by rail from Botwood. 1 sawmill. Post Sav. Bank. 155 radios. PT.

 

            BISHOP’S HARBOR.  Pop. 81. Fishing settlement in Bonavista B., near Salvage.

 

            BLACK DUCK BROOK.  Pop. 16. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the Port au Port peninsula, on the outer coast of the point. 1 sawmill. 3 radios. PO.

 

            BLACK DUCK COVE.  Pop. 50. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the St. Barbe coast, in St. Barbe B.          

 

            BLACK DUCK COVE.  Pop. 30. Fishing settlement on Twillingate Is., N.D.B.

 

            BLACK DUCK POND. Pop. 106. Fishing-farming settlement on the main road from Bay Roberts, between Coley’s Point and Bareneed, Conception B.

 

            BLACKHEAD.  Pop. 183. A fishing-farming settlement on the North Shore of Conception B., notable for the number of professional men and women it has produced. Here was built the first Wesleyan Church in Newfoundland. In 14 days the men of the place cut the timber, hauled it out, hewed it and built the church ready for use. Birthplace of Rev. Levi Curtis, M.A., D.D.; Dr. E.F. Moores, M.D. 11 m. by highway from Carbonear.

 

            BLACKHEAD.  Pop. 56. Fishing settlement 2 or 3 miles south of St. John’s.

 

            BLACKHEAD ROAD AREA.  Pop. 728. Situated on the level brow of the Southside Hill, and overlooking St. John’s, this is a fast-growing suburb of the capital to which many people have been enticed by inexpensive land on which to build their homes. Has a church and school.

 

            BLACK ISLAND.  Pop. 118. Fishing settlement of west end of Ne World Island, N.D.B. PO.

 

            BLACK ISLAND.  Pop. 38. Fishing settlement in Friday’s B., New World Island, N.D.B

 

            BLACK TICKLE.  Pop. 40. Fishing settlement roughly half-way between Spotted Islands and Sandwich Bay, Labrador.

 

            BLAKETOWN.  Pop. 184. Lumbering-farming settlement on south side of Trinity B. 5 m. by highway from Whitbourne. One of the first of Newfoundland’s few inland settlements. 6 sawmills. 9 radios. POMO.

 

            BLOOMFIELD.  Pop. 349. Lumbering-farming settlement in Goose B., Bonavista B., between Musgravetown and Lethbridge. 6 sawmills. 6 radios. POMO.

 

            BLOW-ME-DOWN.  Pop. 162. One of the quaint and interesting ancient fishing settlements on the Port de Grave peninsula, Conception B.

 

            BLOW ME DOWN.  Pop. 60. Fishing settlement on the north shore of Conception B., between Flatrock and Salmon Cove.

 

            BLUE COVE.  Pop. 53. Fishing-lobstering settlement on St. Barbe coast, near Plum Point, north of Brig B.

 

            BLUFF HEAD COVE.  Pop. 121. Fishing settlement on S. Twillingate Island, 3 m. from Twillingate.

 

            BOAT HARBOR.  Pop. 83. Fishing settlement on the east side of Burin Peninsula. 1 radio. 1 sawmill. PO.

 

            BOAT HARBOR.  Pop. 59. Fishing settlement on the St. Barbe Promontory, between Cape Bauld and Cape Norman, separating St. Barbe and White B. districts. 1 radio.

 

            BOBBY’S COVE.  Pop. 30. Fishing settlement just north of Nipper’s Hr., north side of Green B., N.D.B.

 

            BOLSTER’S ROCK.  Pop. 43. Fishing settlement a few miles north of Venison Island, Labrador.

 

            BONAVENTURE(See New and Old).

 

            BONAVISTA.  Pop. 4,022. One of Newfoundland’s four or five oldest fishing settlements, and from the earliest times to the present her largest inshore fishing centre. First settled probably in the early 16th century. (The oldest Bill of Sale on record in the Registry of Deeds is of Bonavista origin: Tilley’s fishing-room, 1720). The settlement lies, at its southern extremity, about three miles inside Cape Bonavista (q.v.) and extends northward practically to the Cape, being made up of numerous coves which, so far as buildings are concerned, overflow one into the other. Amongst many other things, the settlement is famous for the fact that it was here, in 1726, that the first school of which we have any record was established in Newfoundland. Here, in 1705, was fought Captain Michael Gill’s famous battle against invading French ships. The town was several times invaded by the French: 1686, 1702, 1703, 1704, and 1705. One of the sections of the town has a French name: Canaille; while Mockbeggar, another section, is supposed by some students to be of French origin. In 1677 it has 18 dwellings, 16 planters, 13 wives, 2 sons, 13 daughters, 96 fishing servants, 28 boats, 8 cattle, 28 sheep, 51 pigs, 13 gardens, and produced 3,040 quintals of fish, the largest production in Newfoundland. In 1705 it had 25 houses and families. It is the northern terminus of the Bonavista branch of the Newfoundland railway, the southern terminus being Clarenville, on the main line, 89 m. distant. There is a cold storage bait depot. The Church of England stone church is the finest church edifice outside of St. John’s, while the United (Methodist) is the largest church building possessed by its denomination outside of the capital. The Loyal Orange Association Lodge here is said to have the largest membership of any lodge in North America. Here also is the largest lodge of the Society of United Fishermen. Lying close to Bonavista are Lancaster (2 m.), Spillar’s Cove (2½), Elliston (5), Little Catalina (10), Catalina (10), Port Union (12); and, in the opposite direction, Birchy Cove (8), Newman’s Cove and the three Amherst Coves (9 to 12), and Knight’s Cove, Stock Cove, King’s Cove, Broad Cove, and Keels (14 to 22 m. distant). These places, together with Bonavista itself in the centre, have a total population, the overwhelming majority fishermen, of 8,618 people. Most of these are the descendants of people ho settled in those places from Bonavista itself as the town began to be overcrowded and the fishing grounds to shrink. Bonavista is also the original home of the ancestors of many of the present generation of Salvage, and of many other places throughout central and northern Bonavista Bay, and of other places as far north as Doting Cove and Carmanville. Bonavista is perhaps Newfoundland’s largest salmon-catching centre, and possesses more salmon-catching gear than any one place in the country. A large quantity of partridge (lingan) and blue berries is exported annually. Gov’t cold storage bait freezer. Cottage Hos. Bank of Nova Scotia. 220 m. by rail from St. John’s (change at Clarenville), 89 from Clarenville, 10 m. by road from Catalina. 1 sawmill. Post Sav. Bank. 142 radios. PT.

 

            BONNE BAY.  Pop. 1164. Situated on the north-est coast of the Island, north of Bay of Islands, this bay possesses some of the most magnificent scenery in Newfoundland. Frequented by large tuna fish. Lee Wulff fished here. Settlements within it: Woody Point, pop. 196; Lomond, pop. 141; Norris Point, pop. 381; Glenburnie, pop. 102; Shoal Brook, pop. 125; Curzon Village, pop. 219. New highway being constructed from Lomond to Deer Lake, 33 m., connecting thence with Corner Brook, total distance 65m. C.M. Lane, Asst. Mgr. 1 sawmill. Cottage Hos. Dr. Herbert T. Dove, M.H.O. Northern Ranger. 31 radios. PT.

 

            BOSWARLOS.  Pop. 136. Farming settlement on the south side of East Bay, Port au Port peninsula.

 

            BOTWOOD.  Pop. 1090. Situated at the head of Bay of exploits this is a summer shipping port for Grand Falls newsprint and Buchans ore concentrates. The paper company operates its own railway (22 m.) From Grand Falls to here, via Bishop’s Falls. The three towns are also connected by highway, over which, except in winter, considerable motor-bus, truck and taxi traffic passes. All land on both sides of this road has in late years been taken up by residents of Grand Falls for farming-gardening purposes. Botwood was formerly a lumbering centre and was known as Botwoodville, being named after the late Dean Botwood. Here in 1910, the Fisherman’s Protective Union Trading Co. established its first store, under the management of E.D. Elliott. Is now famous as a seaplane base in transatlantic flying. 227 m. by rail from St. John’s, 43 by water from Lewisporte. Clyde. 3 sawmills. 184 radios. Post. Sav. Bank. PT.

 

            BOXEY.  Pop. 181. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the west side of Fortune B., a few miles west of Belleoram and English Harbor W. 1 radio. PO.

 

            BOYD’S COVE.  Pop. 297. Fishing-lumbering settlement on the mainland opposite the eastern side of Chapel’s Island, one of the islands bordering on the beautiful Dildo Run, N.D.B., 147 m. from Lewisporte. Clyde. 3 sawmills. 7 radios. PO.

 

            BRAGG’S ISLAND.  Pop. 209. Fishing settlement on the north side of Bonavista B., lying off the north entrance to Pitt Sound reach. 8 radios. PT.

 

            BRAZIL.  Pop. 20. Fishing-lobstering settlement )island) between Port aux Basques and Rose Blanche, S.W. Coast.

 

            BRAKE’S COVE.  Pop. 61. Fishing-logging settlement in Bay of Islands.

 

            BRANCH.  Pop. 386. Lying on the west side of St. Mary’s Bay, this is the headquarters of the Cape Shore community co-operative development movement, established in 1935, by a group of private citizens, mostly of St. John’s. Farming and cattle raising are an important activity here, and the section is notable for its mutton. 125 m. by highway from St. John’s. 1 sawmill. 4 radios. PT.

 

            BRENT’S COVE.  Pop. 140. Fishing-farming settlement 5 m. from La Scie, on the promontory which separates Green B. from White B. 1 sawmill. PO.

 

            BREWLEY.  Pop. 88. Fishing settlement at the northern end of Merasheen Island, at the head of Placentia B. PO.

 

            BRICKYARD.  Pop. 12. In this settlement at the head of Trinity B, near Clarenville, is one of the two brick-making plants in Newfoundland. 2 sawmills.

 

            BRIDGEPORT.  Pop. 225. Fishing settlement in Friday’s Bay of Ne World Island, Twillingate Dist. 1 sawmill.

 

            BRIG BAY.  Pop. 98. A logging-fishing settlement on the St. Barbe coast. 775 m. from St. John’s, 199 from Humbermouth. Northern Ranger. 2 sawmills. 5 radios. PT.

 

            BRIGHTON ISLAND.  Pop. 158. Fishing settlement on the S. end of Long Island, which itself is east of Little Bay Islands, N.D.B. 2 radios. PO.

 

            BRIGUS.  Pop. 886. One of the country’s most ancient settlements. First settled probably in the early 17th century. In 1677 it had 3 dwellings, 3 planters, 3 wives, 4 sons, 2 daughters, 33 fishery servants, 1 boat, 4 horses, 13 hogs, 2 gardens, and produced 580 quintals of fish. In the ea of the sailing vessel in the sealing hunt, Brigus attained great importance and prosperity, being from 1830 to 1850 second only to St. John’s in the size of its sealing fleet. Here in 1819 Capt. Wm. Munden built the first sealing vessel of 100 tons. She was still in use in 1873. Upwards of 3000 seal hunters have sailed out of Brigus to the icefields in one spring. The settlement is famous as the birthplace of the great Newfoundland Arctic explorer, Capt. Robert A. Bartlett, affectionately known throughout the world as “Captain Bob.” A native of Brigus, John Perry, was the first native-born Methodist clergyman in Newfoundland; he was ordained in England about 1810. Birthplace of late Sir John C. Crosbie, and of Deputy Mayor James R. Chalker. Here in 1914 lived Rockwell Kent the artist, who kept a studio. 52 m. by rail from St. John’s; 49 by paved highway. Capt. Bob Bartlett’s sister operates a delightful inn here. Dr. F.D. Gill, M.H.O. 3 sawmills. 74 radios. PT.

 

            BRIGUS JUNCTION.  Pop. 108. Important chiefly for being the junction of the Conception B. branch railway with the main railway line. Passengers by rail from the Placentia branch railway here join the Conception B. branch to St. John’s. 41 m. from St. John’s; 41 from Argentia, terminus of Placentia branch; 38 from Carbonear, northern terminus of the Conception B. branch. 2 sawmills. 4 radios.

 

            BRIGUS SOUTH.  Pop. 93. An ancient fishing settlement on the Southern Shore, a little north of Cape Broyle Harbor. First settled probably early in 17th century or late in the 16th. In 1677 it had 3 dwellings, 3 planters, 3 wives, 4 sons, 2 daughters, 33 fishing servants, 7 boats, 4 horses, 13 hogs, and produced 480 qts. Of fish. Its 4 horses constituted a third of all those in Newfoundland, St. John’s having the other 8. In 1705 it had 6 houses and families. Has one of the country’s oldest cemeteries. LT.

 

            BRISTOL’S HOPE.  Pop. 149. Old name: Mosquito, and sometimes Musketta. An ancient settlement first settled probably in the very early 17th or late 16th century. Became a branch of the colony which John Guy established at Cupids in 1610. Here, March 27, 1613, was born a son of the wife of Nicholas Gure, one of Guy’s colonists S the first white child of whose birth in Newfoundland there is any record; though it is quite likely that even before this other white children were born in Newfoundland S for example at St. John’s, or any one of several other ancient settlements. Nicholas Gure’s Rock, on or near the actual site of Gure’s dwelling, is still pointed out. Inscriptions which existed on it up to recent years are now obliterated. The settlement’s most famous native-son was General Sir Henry Pynn, who fought under Wellington in the Peninsular War, and was the first native-born Newfoundlander to be knighted, 1770-1885. His ancestor was one of the leaders in the successful defence of Carbonear Island against the French under D’Iberville, 1696-97. In 1677 it had 2 dwellings, 2 planters, 4 sons, 5 daughters, 22 fishery servants, 5 boats, 38 cattle, 2 sheep, 20 hogs, 4 gardens, and produced 410 quintals of fish. Bristol’s Hope is a fertile valley leading in from the sea, within sight of Carbonear Island, and lies about halfway between Harbor Grace and Carbonear. It is a prosperous farming section. 69 m. by highway from St. John’s.

 

            BRITANNIA.  Pop. 101. Fishing settlement in Smith’s Sound, Random island, north side of Trinity B. 3 sawmills. 10 radios. POMO.

 

            BRITISH HARBOR.  Pop. 156. Fishing settlement a little south of Trinity and Bonaventure, on north side of Trinity B. 3 sawmills, 3 radios. POMO.

 

            BROAD COVE.  Pop. 407. Fishing-farming settlement on the south side of Conception B., south of Western B. 10 m. by highway from Carbonear. Birthplace of Revs. A.R. Baggs and Samuel Baggs. 69 radios. POMO.

 

            BROAD COVE.  Pop. 165. Fishing settlement on south side of Bonavista B., between King’s Cove and Keels.

 

            BROAD COVE.  Pop. 118. Fishing settlement on the mainland inside of Oderin Island, west side of Placentia B.

 

            BROAD COVE.  Pop. 37. Fishing settlement on the eastern side of Hr. Breton Bay, which itself lies between Great Bay d’Leau and Connaigre B., Fortune B.

 

            BROAD COVE.  Pop. 34. Fishing settlement at the S.W. bottom of Trinity B., between S. Dildo and Dildo.

 

            BROADS.  Pop. 150. Farming section inland from Clarke’s Beach, between North and South Rivers, Conception B.

 

            BROOKFIELD.  Pop. 287. Important Labrador fishing settlement on the north side of Bonavista B., near Wesleyville.

 

            BROOKLYN.  Pop. 187. Lumbering settlement at head of Goose B., beside Lethbridge, which is on the Bonavista branch railway. 1 sawmill. Dr. Wulf Grobin, M.H.O. 4 radios. POMO.

 

            BROOKSIDE.  Pop. 71. Fishing-lobstering settlement in Placentia B. West, near Boat Hr., west of Bay d’ L’eau. 1 sawmill.

 

            BROWN’S ARM.  Pop. 32. Situated on the north side of the B. of Exploits. A land-settlement colony was established by the Commission of Government in 1936. 25 settlers. A newly-built (1939) road connects with Lewisporte, 8 m. 2 sawmills. PO.

 

            BROWN’S COVE.  Pop. 33. Lumbering settlement on the north side of White Bay, nearly up to the bottom.

 

            BROWNSDALE.  Pop. 157. Fishing settlement on the outer coast near New Melbourne, south side of Trinity B. 113 m. by highway from St. John’s, 23 from Heart’s Content, 6 m. west of Old Perlican. Founded about 1830. 7 radios. POMO.

 

            BRUNETTE.  Pop. 221. (Mercer’s Cove 171, Forward’s Cove 52). Large fishing island lying well off the mouth of Fortune B., about half-way between the French island of St. Pierre, and St. Jacques. 1 radio. POMO.

 

            Bryant’s cove.  Pop. 329. An ancient settlement in Conception B., 2 m. by road from Ha. Grace. In 1677 it had 2 dwellings, 2 planters, 1 wife, 1 son, 3 daughters, 12 fishing servants, 4 boats, and produced 390 qts. Of fish.

 

            BUCHANS.  Pop. 1,104. Newfoundland’s newest industrial town. Founded in 1927, this our second great mining development, Bell Island being the first. Its deposits of lead-zinc-copper-silver-gold are said to be the richest of their kind in the world. The ore, which lies in the earth immediately beside the town, is mined by the “glory hole” method and is crushed and concentrated in a plant in the town originally designed for the purpose. The concentrates are shipped by the Buchans Mining Co. over its own railway to Millertown, thence over the line of the Newfoundland Railway to Bishop’s Falls, and from there to Botwood, the shipping port, over the Anglo-Newfoundland Development Co’s railway, a total distance of 37 m. Buchans lies near the shore of Red Indian Lake, 40 m. from Millertown Junction, and 284 m. from St. John’s. The total value of ore-exports to Dec. 1938 was $48,913,000. The town has a hockey and skating rink. Also a consumer’s co-operative, with a shop. Bank of Montreal sub-agency. Customs. Post Sav. Bnk. 205 radios. PT.

 

            BUCHANS JUNCTION.  Pop. 37. The junction of the Buchans-Millertown railway.

 

            BULLEY’S COVE.  Pop. 68. Fishing settlement on the eastern coast of the Ne Bay peninsula, N.D.B.

 

            BUNYAN’S COVE.  Pop. 308. Lumbering-farming settlement in Clode Sound, Bonavista B. 6½ m. from Port Blandford. Many of the fishermen go every year as stationers on the French Shore to fish. Most of the present generation are descended from people who removed here from Bonavista, Elliston and Greenspond. 1 sawmill. 8 radios. PO.

 

            BURGEO.  Pop. 823. Important fishing-lobstering settlement on two islands on the S.W. Coast, roughly half-way between Hermitage B. and Port aux Basques. It was partly after these islands that the political district Burgeo and LaPoile was named. Here in the late 18th century Capt. Cook, while on his map-making coast survey of Newfoundland, observed an eclipse of the sun. First settled between 1795 and 1800. 488 m. from Argentia, 75 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo, Bacalieu. 1 sawmill. Cottage Hosp. Dr. John Heath, M.H.O. Post Sav. Bnk. Customs. 29 radios. PT.

 

            BURGOYNE’S COVE.  Pop. 70. Lumbering-farming-fishing settlement in Smith’s Sound, Random Island, north side of Trinity B. 2 sawmills. Turkey’s raised. 5 radios. POMO.

 

            BURIN.  Pop. 2,637. The general name given to a number of settlements in Burin Bay, on the west side of Placentia B., on the eastern side of the Burin Peninsula. Settlements: Black Duck Cove, 44; Bull Cove, 136; Burin Bay, 297; Burin Bay Arm, 91; Burin Bay North, 359; Collins Cove, 53; Kirby’s Cove, 48; Long Cove, 24; Lune’s (or Loon’s) Cove, 127; Mosquito Cove, 27; Pardy’s Island, 98; Path End, 91; Port au Bras, 315; Salmonier, 89; Salt Pond, 79; Sandy Point, 15; Shalloway, 58; Ship Cove, 52; Stepaside, 58; Wandsworth, 116; hale’s Cove, 20. The first settlement in Burin probably began late 17th or early 18th century. Here the celebrated 18th century mercantile firm of Christopher Spurrier had its Newfoundland headquarters. Fishing is carried on from all the settlements. A look-out cairn erected by Capt. Cook at the time of his late 18th century coastal survey of the Island is still to be seen here. The Bay is amongst the Island’s most picturesque. Cottage Hosp. Dr. Wm. Kyle, M.H.O. Privately owned bait freezer. Marine dock. Bank of Nova Scotia. 114 m. from Argentia. Home, Bacalieu. Customs. Post Sav. Bank. 69 radios. PT.

 

            BURLINGTON.  Pop. 230. Important logging-lumbering settlement on the north side of the mouth of Green B. Bowater Co. of Corner Brook employs 150 men cutting pit-props for export to Great Britain. 179 m. from Lewisporte. Clyde. 3 sawmills. 11 radios. POMO.

 

            BURN COVE.  Pop. 55. Fishing settlement on the Southern Shore, part of Tor’s Cove. 29 m. by highway from St. John’s.

 

            BURNSIDE.  Pop. 178. Fishing-logging settlement in central part of Bonavista B., near St. Chad’s. 3 radios. POMO.

 

            BURNT ARM.  Pop. 117. An arm of B. of Exploits. 1 sawmill.

 

            BURNT COVE.  Pop. 79. Fishing settlement in Burnt Arm, on the N.W. side of New World Island, N.D.B.

 

            BURNT ISLAND.  Pop. 50. Fishing-lumbering settlement between Bragg’s Island and Louis Island, north side of Bonavista B., 9 m. S.W. of Greenspond. PO.

 

            BURNT ISLAND.  Pop. 95. Fishing settlement in Placentia B. West, near Petit Forte. PO.

 

            BURNT ISLANDS. Pop. 433. Fishing-lumbering settlement roughly half-way between Port aux Basques and Rose Blanche. A fish-glue factory was once operated here. 513 m. from Argentia, 10 m. from Port aux basques. Burgeo. 5 radios. POMO.

 

            BURNT ISLAND TICKLE.  Pop. 30. Fishing settlement on Twillingate Is., N.D.B.

 

            BURNT POINT.  Pop. 311. Fishing settlement on the North Shore of Conception B., between Lower island Cove and Northern B. 20 m. by highway from Carbonear. 20 radios. PO.

 

            BUTTER COVE.  Pop. 81. Fishing settlement on the north side of Trinity B., near Heart’s Ease, near southern entrance to S.W. Arm of Random Sound.

C

            CAINES ISLAND.  Pop. 75. Fishing-lobstering settlement near Rose Blanche, Burgeo Dist., S.W. Coast.

 

            CALMER.  Pop. 67. Fishing settlement on the promontory of the Burin peninsula, about 4 m. east of Point May.

 

            CALVERT.  Pop. 416. Old name: Caplin Bay. A fishing settlement on the Southern Shore. About 25 years ago renamed in honour of Sir George Calvert (1st Lord Baltimore) who founded a colony at ferryland, 1621, and whose son founded the present American State of Maryland. 44 m. by highway from St. John’s. 1 sawmill. 8 radios. PO.

 

            CAMPBELL’S CREEK.  Pop. 86. Fishing-farming settlement on southern shore of the Port au Port peninsula. 1 sawmill.

 

            CAMPBELLTON. Pop. 460. Important postal wireless transmitting centre in N.D.B. Formerly a large sawmill operated here. Now most of the men go away to the paper mill companies’ logging camps. 11 m. from Lewisporte. Clyde. 2 sawmills. Post Sav. Bank. 15 radios. PT.

 

            CANADA BAY.  A bay of noble scenery on the French Shore, 44 m. south of St. Anthony. Considerable logging, and Bowater Co. of Corner Brook employs 200 men cutting pit-props for export, pulpwood for Corner Brook. Within are Canada Hr., Englee and Roddickton. 1 sawmill.

 

            CANADA HR.  Pop. 104. Lying near the entrance to the noble Canada Bay, on the French Shore, this is notable chiefly for its nearness to important deposits of marble. In 1764 one Poole fishing ship with 77 men and 10 boats frequented here. 455 m. from St. John’s. Northern Ranger. 2 radios. PO.

 

            CANNING’S COVE.  Pop. 188. Fishing-farming settlement in Goose B., opposite Jamestown, south side of Bonavista B. 1 sawmill.

 

            CAPE ANGUILLE.  Pop. 528. Fishing-farming-lobstering settlement on the West Coast, 6 m. N.W. of the Great Codroy River, about 20 m. N. of Cape Ray. This is the S.W. extremity of the Anguille Mountain Range, which runs the whole length of the Grand River Valley. Most westerly point of Newfoundland. Canadian Government Lighthouse.

 

            CAPE BAULD.  Pop. 7. Most northerly point of Newfoundland. Lighthouse.

 

            CAPE BONAVISTA.  The landfall of John Cabot, discoverer of Newfoundland, 1497. “Oh, happy sight!” (See also Bonavista). Lighthouse.

 

            CAPE BROYLE.  Pop. 487. Important old fishing settlement on the Southern Shore. In 1705 there were 12 houses and families. Birthplace of Sir Michael Cashin, sometime Prime Minister. 40 m. by highway from St. John’s. 1 sawmill. 20 radios. PT.

 

            CAPE CHARLES.  Pop. 91. Labrador fishing settlement between Henley Hr. and Battle Hr. Here in 1765 Nicholas Darby of Bristol had a fishing post with 150 men brought from England. In 1767 forced by Eskimo attacks to abandon the post. 2 radios. PO.

 

            CAPE COVE.  Pop. 58. Fishing settlement just south of Cape Fogo, Fogo Island.

 

            CAPE FREELS.  Pop. 219 (Cape Island, 120, included). The northerly extremity of Bonavista B., and the southern point of the “Straight Shore.” A fishing settlement famous in Newfoundland as the birthplace of John Vincent, the artist. Vincent, now living in New York, painted the late Pope Pius XI and the late King George V, and numerous other notable men. 193 m. from St. John’s. 2 radios. PO.

 

            CAPE JOHN.  Pop. 8. Situated on Gull Island, this by the Treaty of Utretch 1713 became the southern boundary of the French Shore. The lighthouse here is the highest in the country, 525 feet. On this island in the winter of 1867 occurred the tragedy of the “Queen of Swansea” which ran ashore in a snow-storm. The passengers and crew got on the Island, but perished one by one of starvation and exposure.

 

            CAPE LA HUNE.  Pop. 199. Fishing settlement on the S.W. Coast near the cape of the same name. 413 m. from Argentia, 110 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo. 8 radios. PT.

 

             CAPE NORMAN.  Pop. 10. Northern tip of Newfoundland, in the Straits of Belle Isle. Named 1764 by Capt. James Cook after one of his associates aboard H.M.S. Pembroke S Lieut. James Norman. 1 sawmill.

 

            CAPE NORTH.  Pop. 33. Salmon and codfishing settlement inside of Grady, which itself lies just south of Sandwich Bay, Labrador.

 

            CAPE ONION.  Pop. 164. Fishing settlement at northern tip of Newfoundland, roughly half-way between Cape Norman and Cape Bauld. 2 radios. PO.

 

            CAPE PINE.  Pop. 11. South-west corner of Trepassey Bay.

 

            CAPE RACE.  Pop. 46. The south-eastern extremity of Newfoundland. Canadian Government maintains a very important lighthouse here; its light beam being visible in clear weather a distance of 19 m. The Marconi Co. of Canada operates a wireless and direction-finding station. 6 radios. PT.

 

            CAPE RAY.  Pop. 165. One of the three capes forming the triangular points of Newfoundland: Cape Race, Cape Bauld, Cape Ray. Lies on the south-west corner of the Island. Distances: Cape Ray to Cape Bauld, 283 m.; Cape Bauld to Cape Race, 312 m.; Cape Race to Cape Ray, 263 m. Canadian Government maintains an important lighthouse serving the Cabot Strait between Cape Breton, N.S., and Newfoundland. 2 radios. PO.

 

            CAPE SPEAR.  Pop. 13. The new World’s nearest point to Europe, 1,640 m. from Cape Clear, Ireland. The well-known marine landmark just south of St. John’s, and southern boundary of St. John’s Bay. Within the bay lies Freshwater, fishing settlement and popular picnic and berry-picking resort for St. John’s people. Lighthouse.

 

            CAPE ST. FRANCIS.  This cape, 18 m. north of St. John’s, separates Conception B. from the Atlantic. Lighthouse.

 

            CAPE ST. GEORGE.  Pop. 256. Fishing settlement. Southern tip of the Port au Port peninsula, and northern tip of the entrance to Bay St. George. Lighthouse. 2 sawmills. 10 radios.

 

            CAPE ST. MARY’S.  Pop. 3. The cape with separates St. Mary’s and Placentia Bays. Lighthouse.

 

            CAPLIN COVE.  Pop. 202. Fishing settlement on the North Shore of Conception B>, between Bay de Verde and Lower Island Cove. 6 radios. PO.

 

            CAPLIN COVE.  Pop. 89. Fishing settlement on the S.W. Arm of Random Sound, Trinity B. North.

 

            CAPLIN COVE.  Pop. 26. Fishing settlement between Tilt Cove and Shoe Cove on north side of Green B., N.D.B.

 

            CAPPAHAYDEN.  Pop. 73. Fishing settlement on the Southern Shore. Here many shipwrecks have occurred, including that of the Florizel, 1918. 67 m. by highway from St. John’s. 1 radio. PO.

 

            CAPSTAN ISLAND.  Pop. 29. Labrador fishing settlement between L’Ance au Diable and West St. Modeste, Straits of Belle Isle.

 

            CARBONEAR.  Pop. 3,367. The largest town in Conception Bay, and the sixth largest in Newfoundland, this is also one of the country’s oldest settlements dating probably from the early 16th century. In 1697, at the time of D’Iberville’s invasion of the Island, Carbonear had 22 dwellings as against Harbor Grace’s 14, and there were fish merchants there worth ^100,000 each. In 1705 it had 30 houses and families. The town was several times attacked and sacked by the French. It was always a very important fishing center, and during the first part of the 19th century the home port of a very important fleet of sailing vessels going to the ice fields to hunt seals. It was a Carbonear sealing captain, Thomas Grant, who devised the plan of partitioning holds of vessels into compartments to prevent the seals or seal-pelts from shifting position when the oil began to run, and so capsizing vessels, as so often happen before this device was introduced. Carbonear was the home also of Richard Taylor, who invented the “false beam” and the use of iron sheathing in sealing vessel construction.  Today Carbonear is no longer an important home-fishing or sealing center, nor the home port of the fleet of Labrador fishing vessels, but a large number of men goal from there as stationers on the Labrador coast.  An important wood-working factory is operated.  There is a fine hockey and skating rink.  Bank of Nova Scotia.  Carbonear is the birthplace of the great physicist, Professor William Boyle, and of Professor William George Guy.  In 1677 the settlement had 14 dwellings, 11 planters, 9 wives, 15 sons, 20 daughters, 107 fishery servants, 25 boats, 79 cattle, 22 sheep, 48 hogs, 12 gardens.  79 m. by rail from St. John’s, 28 m. by rail from Brigus Junction, 72 m. by highway from St. John’s, 73 m. by water from St. John’s.  Kyle.  Dr. G L. Stentaford, .H.O. Customs. 290 radios. Post. Sav. Bank. PT.

 

            CARD’S HARBOUR.  Pop. 129. Fishing settlement near Pilley’s Island, N.D.B.

 

            CARMANVILLE.  Pop. 684. Important fishing-lumbering settlement lying between the Strait Shore and Gander B. Important sawmill. Has number of Labrador fishing schooners, and several coasting vessels. 252 m. from St. John’s. Sagona. 5 sawmills. 16 radios. PT.

 

            CARTER’S COVE.  Pop. 97. Fishing-farming settlement between Bridgeport and Summerford, on the western side of New World Island, N.D.B. PO.

 

            CARTWRIGHT.  Pop. 148. Founded in 1775 by, and named after, the celebrated George Cartwright, an English army officer and sportsman, who moved there from another part of Labrador, as an adventurer-planter and afterwards published a remarkable 2-vol. Diary of his life in Labrador, now a collector’s item. This is one of Labrador’s most important settlements. A Grenfell establishment with a general hospital, an orphanage school, and an industrial school is operated here. There is also a wireless station. 650 m. from St. John’s. Kyle. H.B. Co. post. 1 sawmill. Customs. 12 radios. PT.

 

            CARTYVILLE.  Pop. 61. Farming settlement close to Robinson’s beside the main railway. 1 sawmill. 22 radios. POMO.

 

            CATALINA.  Pop. 882. Third largest settlement in Trinity B. (Winterton, 977; Heart’s Content, 918). In 1534 Jacques Cartier spend 10 days here. This port in 1583 was visited by Sir Humphry Gilbert amongst other places, in search of precious ores. Seeing large quantities of the ubiquitous but worthless “Catalina stone,” he loaded his ship with it in the belief that it was gold. Catalina was once an important centre from which the Bank fishery was carried on, and in 1842 had 19 vessels going to the seal hunt. No an inshore and Labrador fishing port. Bank of Nova Scotia. Port Union (q.v.) lies within its South West Arm, two m. by land, ½ m. by water, away. 209 m. by rail from St. John’s. Sagona, Northern Ranger, Kyle. Lighthouse. 3 sawmills. Dr. Wm. Templeman, M.H.O. Post Sav. Bank. 43 radios. PT.

 

            CAVENDISH.  Pop. 231. Fishing settlement on the south side of Trinity B., lying between Islington and Whiteway. 15 m. by highway south of Heart’s Content, 25 m. from Whitbourne. 5 sawmills. 6 radios. PO.

            CHAMBERLAIN’S.  Pop. 344. Farming settlement on the south side of Conception Bay. Popular summer resort. 13 miles by highway from St. John’s.

 

            CHAMBER’S ISLAND.  Pop. 32. Lobstering-fishing settlement between Anchor Pt. and Flower’s Cove, St. Barbe coast.

 

            CHAMPNEY’S.  Pop. 551. A fishing-farming settlement lying on the north side of Trinity B., immediately north of Port Rexton. Est 209; East 261; Arm 81. 6 radios. PO.

 

            CHANCE COVE.  Pop. 289. Fishing settlement at the head of Trinity B., on the Isthmus of Avalon. 4 radios. POMO.

 

            CHANCEPORT.  Pop. 42. Fishing settlement on the western end of New World I., N.D.B.

 

            CHANGE ISLANDS.  Pop. 976. The name of a group of islands in Fogo District and of the chief settlement on them. The settlement itself lies on both banks of a magnificent tickle or narrow passage of water about a mile long. The settlement is one of the most picturesque on the North est Coast. The home of a fleet of Labrador fishing schooners. Most of the original inhabitants undoubtedly moved there from Fogo Island, and from Change Island in a somewhat later period went the forefathers of many of the present generation in such places as Herring Neck, Little Bay Islands, farther north. 345 m. from St. John’s, 6 from Fogo, 123 from Lewisporte. Sagona, Clyde. Lighthouse. 24 radios. PT.

 

            CHANNEL.  Pop. 1212. The well-known fishing settlement lying immediately beside Port aux Basques, western terminus of the Cabot Strait and S.W. Coast passenger boats. Considerable winter fishing carried on. Lighthouse. Bank of Nova Scotia. 142 radios. PT.

 

            CHAPEL ARM.  Pop. 282. Fishing-lumbering-farming settlement at head of Trinity B. 81 m. by highway from St. John’s. 2 sawmills. 4 radios. PO.

 

            CHAPEL’S COVE.  Pop. 275. Farming-fishing settlement in Conception B., between Hr. Main and Holyrood.

 

            CHARLES BROOK.  Pop. 30. Fishing settlement on north side of B. of exploits, just north of Point of Bay, the southern boundary of Green B. district.

 

            CHARLESTON.  Pop. 124. Farming settlement on the south side of Bonavista B., close to Princeton and Southern Bay. The cutting of railway ties is an important occupation in this whole neighbourhood. 5 radios. 4 sawmills. POMO.

 

            CHARLOTTETOWN.  Pop. 202. Farming and lumbering settlement in Clode Sound, Bonavista B. 3 m. from Port Blandford. 5 sawmills. 4 radios. PO.

 

            CHIMNEY COVE.  Pop. 61. Fishing settlement on the West Coast near the entrance of B. of Islands.

 

            CLAM BANK COVE(See Lourdes).

 

            CLARENVILLE.  Pop. 523. Important chiefly as a divisional headquarters of the Newfoundland railway, at the head of Random Sound, Trinity B. North. The Bonavista branch railway commences here. Has a hydro-electric plant which supplies light and power here and to neighbouring settlements. Small-scale farming and gardening carried on enthusiastically. 131 m. by rail from St. John’s, 89 from Bonavista. Dr. Bond Cross, J.P., M.H.O. 3 sawmills. Post. Sav. Bank. Customs. 63 radios. PT.

 

            CLARKE’S BEACH.  Pop. 526. A picturesque and busy fishing-farming settlement at the head of Port de Grave B. 54 m. by highway from St. John’s. 3 sawmills. Dr. Samuel Ivemy, M.H.O. 78 radios. PT.

 

            CLARKE’S HEAD.  Pop. 324. (See Gander Bay).

 

            CLATTICE HARBOUR.  Pop. 193. Fishing settlement on east side of the Burin peninsula, Placentia B. est, inside of Great Valen Island. 116 m. from Argentia. Home. 1 sawmill. 2 radios. PO.

 

            CLAY COVE.  Pop. 69. Fishing settlement at the S.W. end of St. Brendan’s, Bonavista Bay North.

 

            CLIFTON.  Pop. 38. Lumbering settlement in Smith Sound, Random island, Trinity B. North, near Burgoyne’s Cove. 7 sawmills.

 

            CLOWN’S COVE.  Pop. 174. A section of Freshwater, Conception Bay, q.v.

 

            COACHMAN’S COVE.  Pop. 294. . Fishing settlement on the promontory between Cape John and White Bay. Lies between Fleur de Lys and Pacquet. 299 m. from St. John’s. Northern Ranger. 3 sawmills. 4 radios. PT.

 

            COBB’S ARM.  Pop. 95. A beautiful settlement on the eastern end of New World Island, N.D.B., at the entrance to Dildo Run. Considerable quantity of limestone is quarried here for St. John’s and the newsprint mills at Corner Brook and Grand Falls.

 

            CODNER.  Pop. 256. Old name: Middle Bight. Farming settlement at head of Conception Bay. Renamed in honour of Samuel Codner, great pioneer promoter of the cause of Education in Newfoundland in the first quarter of the 19th century. 19 m. by highway from St. John’s.

 

            CODROY(See also Great Codroy). Situated on the West Coast, a few miles from Port aux Basques, this valley is perhaps the country’s most fertile farm section. Settled in the main 100-150 years ago, chiefly as hunters and fishermen, by people of Scottish origin from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia; Micmac Indians from Nova Scotia; and French fishermen in the times when the area was dominated by the French. There is a small settlement of the same name, Great Codroy, q.v. Customs. 1 sawmill. 22 radios. POMO.

 

            CODROY POND. Pop. 54. Logging-lumbering settlement in St. George Dist. On the West Coast. Bowater Co. of Corner Brook employs 35 loggers cutting pulpwood. 49 m. by rail from Port aux Basques. 1 sawmill.

 

            COLEY’S POINT. Pop. 825. Fishing-farming settlement near Bay Roberts. In 1697 the French fished here. 60 m. by highway from St. John’s, one of the interesting motor drives from the city. 2 sawmills, 4 on Colinet Road. 13 radios. PO.

 

            COLINET.  Pop. 120. Lumbering settlement at the head of St. Mary’s Bay.

 

            COLLIER’S.  Pop. 683. Farming-fishing settlement in the Hr. Main section of Conception B. 1 sawmill. 7 radios. PO.

 

            COME BY CHANCE.  Pop. 18. Popular partridge shooting grounds on the main railway, 102 m. by rail from St. John’s. At the head of Placentia B., on Isthmus of Avalon. Cottage Hos. Dr. M.G. Coxon, M.H.O.

 

            COMFORT COVE.  Pop. 186. Lumbering-farming settlement near the western entrance to the beautiful Dildo Run, beside Newstead, N.D.B. 2 sawmills.

 

            CONCEPTION HARBOR. Pop. 812. Farming-fishing settlement in the Hr. Main section of Conception B. 40 m. by highway from St. John’s. 23 radios. PT.

 

            CONCHE.  Pop. 403. Fourth largest settlement on the French Shore (using the term in the accepted modern sense as extending from La Scie northward to Cook’s Harbor or Boat Harbor) the larger places being St. Anthony (842), Englee (522) and La Scie (490). It is probably the oldest settlement on the Shore, though Crouse and Croque are probably almost as old. All three date back at least to the early 17th century, and possibly even the early 16th. Of course these settlements were frequented only, or mainly, by the French fishermen S Bonavista was supposed to be used only by the French, though in fact the English also made some use of it. La Scie (or rather, Cape John, immediately south of La Scie) as the southern boundary of the French Shore was specified in the 1713 Treaty, which carried the French Shore all the way around to Point Riche. Conche in modern times is the centre of a good cod and salmon fishery. Farming and cattle-raising are both carried on by the people on a scale much larger than usually found in the more northerly part of the Island. 399 m. from St. John’s. Northern Ranger. 1 sawmill. 4 radios. PT.

 

            CONEY ARM.  Pop. 48. Fishing settlement on the North side of White B., north of Jackson’s Arm.

 

            CONNE.  Pop. 161. The only Micmac Indian settlement in Newfoundland nr. The mouth of Conne River, which empties at the head of Hermitage B., S.W. Coast. Only Indians live here. The Micmacs, who are descended from members of the tribe who removed to Newfoundland 1780-1800, maintain a number of their ancient customs, including that of being ruled by a Chief. They live by lumbering and trapping. Some Micmacs served as sharp-shooters with the Royal Newfoundland Regiment in the Great War. 338 m. from Argentia, 185 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo.

 

            COOK’S HARBOR.  Pop. 231. A notable inshore fishing settlement on the Newfoundland side of the Straits of Belle Isle. 579 m. from St. John’s; 395 from Humbermouth. Northern Ranger. 4 radios. PT.

 

            COOMB’S COVE.  Pop. 229. Fishing settlement at the south-west entrance to Great Bay de L’Eau, between Fortune and Hermitage Bays. 266 m. from Argentia, 242 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo. 1 radio. POMO.

 

            COOPER’S COVE.  Pop. 67. Fishing settlement in Placentia B. West, inside Isle Valen.

 

            COOTE’S COVE.  Pop. 75. Fishing settlement in St. Mary’s B., near Gaskiers.

 

            COPPETT.  Pop. 67. Fishing-lobstering settlement between White Bear B. and Cape la Hune, inside Ramea Islands, S.W. Coast.

 

             CORBIN.  Pop. 103. Fishing settlement between Burin and St. Lawrence, on the east side of the Burin peninsula. LT.

 

            CORBIN.  Pop. 95. Fishing settlement near the N.W. corner of Fortune Bay.

 

            CORNER BROOK.  Pop. 6,374. Newfoundland’s second largest town. Headquarters of Bowater (Nfld.) Pulp & Paper Mills. Here is located one of the most modern and efficient of the world’s newsprint paper mills, on tide-water. First settled about middle of 19th century as a lumbering-trapping-fishing centre, it sprang into great prominence, size and prosperity in 1923, when construction was commenced on the newsprint mill for Nfld. Power & Paper Co., an Anglo-Newfoundland concern. About $50,000,000 was expended on mill, piers, dwellings, and power-development at Deer Lake, 30 m. distant. International Power and Paper Co. (Nfld.) replaced original owners, and became replaced by present owners. Situated at the head of Humber Arm, B. of Islands. On main railway. Nearby are Humbermouth, Curling and several other settlements, all of which derive great benefit from the mill’s operation. Clarke Steamship tourist boats come here each week summertime and fall. Scenery here and nearby is magnificent. New highway runs to deer Lake, and being extended to Bonne Bay. 400 loggers employed nearby. Company hosp. Nurs. Centre and clinic. Bank of Montreal. 3 motion picture theatres. Skating-hockey rink. Fine public and denominational schools, and the country’s finest athletic grounds. “Humber Herald” published weekly. 6 sawmills. 415 m. by rail from St. John’s, 132 from Port aux Basques. Post. Sav. Bank. Customs. 984 radios. PT.

 

            COTTLE’S ISLAND.  Pop. 121. Fishing settlement on the western side of New World Island, N.D.B. 1 sawmill. LT.

 

            COTTRELL’S COVE.  Pop. 122. Fishing settlement on the west side of the New Bay peninsula, N.D.B. PO.

 

            COUNTRY ROAD.  Pop. 315. Farming section between Bay Roberts and Clarke’s Beach, Conception B.

 

            COW HEAD.  Pop. 289. Fishing-lobstering settlement on St. Barbe coast, just north of St. Paul’s Bay. 878 m. from St. John’s; 96 from Humbermouth. Northern Ranger. 3 sawmills. Nurs. Cent. 4 radios. PT.

 

            COWARD’S ISLAND.  Pop. 141. The N.E. Island of Flat islands, a Labrador and inshore fishing settlement lying off the north side of Bonavista B. 1 radio. PO.

 

            COX’S COVE.  Pop. 201. An important herring catching and packing centre at Middle Arm, B. of Islands. Island Timber Co. employs 250 loggers cutting pit props for export to G. Britain. 15 radios. 1 sawmill. POMO.

 

            CRESTON SOUTH.  Pop. 259. Farming-lumbering settlement at the head of Mortier B., near the isthmus which separates that Bay from Burin Inlet. 3 sawmills. 11 radios. PO.

 

            CROQUE.  (or Croc) Pop. 35. An ancient fishing settlement on the French Shore, between Conche and Hare Bay. 1 sawmill. By the French regulations of 1640 the master of the first fishing vessel landing here became admiral of the entire French fishing fleet in Newfoundland for that season. Croque was the immediate rendezvous of the entire French fishing fleet.

 

            CROUSE.  Pop. 28. Ancient fishing settlement on the French Shore, between Conche and Croque.

 

            CROW HEAD.  Pop. 240. Fishing settlement near Tizzard’s Hr., on the N.W. end of New World Island, N.D.B. 1 sawmill.

 

            CUL DE SAC (WEST).  Pop. 65. Fishing-lobstering settlement near Cape La Hune, Burgeo Dist., S.W. Coast.

 

            CUL DE SAC (EAST).  Pop. 65. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the S.W. Coast, about 7 m. from Rencontre W.

 

            CULL’S HARBOR.  Pop. 42. Fishing settlement near Traytown, Alexander B., Bonavista B.

 

            CUPIDS.  Pop. 562. An historic settlement. Here in 1610 Alderman John Guy (afterwards Mayor) of Bristol, England, settled the first formal colony, “Sea Forest Plantation,” in our history. Cuper’s Cove, to use the old name, lies near the head of Port de Grave, then called Bay de Grave, in Conception B. Guy’s charter granted him all the coast between Cape St. Mary’s and Cape Bonavista, though the public fishing rights were reserved. His party to newfoundland consisted of himself, his brother Philip, his brother-in-law William Colston, and 39 colonists in three ships. At Cupids he built 3 houses, and wharves, stores, fish stages and flakes; a fort 94 x 120 feet enclosed by a substantial stockade and a battery mounted with 3 guns. At South River (q.v.) he erected other houses, mills and farm buildings, and cleared a considerable quantity of land. Guy himself returned to England at the end of 1611, but returned next spring with more colonists, farmers and artisans, and livestock, poultry and farming tools. With him came the Rev. Erasmus Stourton, the first Anglican clergyman to reside in Newfoundland. Guy went back to Bristol in 1613, and Colston became Governor, 1613-14, being replaced then by Capt. John Mason, afterwards founder of the present American State of New Hampshire. Mason returned to England in 1621. In 1620 he published “A Brief Discourse of the Newfoundland,” one of our earliest books. For a while the famous North American Indian, Squantum, friend of the Pilgrim Fathers in America, lived here. The Colony disappeared in 1628, though many of the colonists remained and have descendants here to this day. In 1910 the Guy Tercentennial celebrations were held here and at the places where branch colonies had existed. A monument and flag staff ere erected to Guy’s memory, and the Newfoundlanders at Toronto presented Cupids with what is reputedly the second-largest Union Jack in the world. It measures 40 x 32 feet. Cupids is now a fishing-farming settlement, 52 m. by highway from St. John’s; 54 m. by rail. 54 radios. POMO.

 

            CURLING.  Pop. 981. Old name: Birchy Cove. Oldest settlement in Bay of Islands. First settled about 1780-90. In the 19th century it became the headquarters for the British naval officers in charge of the patrolling of the French Shore. Here lived the Rev. Joseph Curling, a wealthy and aristocratic Anglican clergyman who did notable social welfare work on the coast. Until Corner Brook (3 m. away) developed, the capital of Bay of Islands, and still the headquarters of the Bay herring export trade. Many of the male inhabitants work in the Corner Brook mill. “Western Star” is published weekly. Bank of Montreal. 407 m. by rail from St. John’s; 140 from Port aux Basques. 4 sawmills. Dr. J.I. O’Connell, MHO. 142 radios. PT.

 

            CURRENT ISLAND.  Pop. 53. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the St. Barbe coast, near the southern point of St. Barbe B.

 

            CURZON VILLAGE.  Pop. 219. Fishing settlement within the beautiful Bonne B., West Coast.

 

            CUSLETT.  Pop. 108. Fishing settlement on the east side of Placentia B., roughly half-way between Placentia and Cape St. Mary’s, on the Cape Shore. 110 m. by highway from St. John’s. PO.

D

            DANIEL’S COVE.  Pop. 73. Fishing settlement on the St. Barbe coast roughly half-way between St. Paul’s B. and Point Riche. 2 radios. PO.

 

            DANIEL’S HARBOR.  Pop. 210. Fishing-lumbering settlement on the St. Barbe coast. 858 m. from St. John’s; 116 from Humbermouth. Northern Ranger. 3 sawmills. Nursing Cent. 10 radios. PT.

 

            DANIEL’S POINT.  Pop. 117. Fishing settlement in Trepassey B. LT.

 

            DARK COVE.  Pop329. Lumbering settlement in Freshwater B., Bonavista B., a few miles from Gambo. 3 sawmills.

 

            DARK COVE.  Pop. 34. Fishing settlement near Salvage, central part of Bonavista B.

 

            DARK HOLE.  Pop. 29. Fishing settlement at the western end of Random S.W. Arm, Trinity B. North.

 

            DAVIS COVE.  Pop. 104. Fishing settlement on the west side of Placentia B., inside of Merasheen Island. 2 radios.

 

            DAVIS INLET.  Pop. Fishing settlement on Labrador, north of Hopedale. H.B. Co. post. PO.

 

            DAVIS ISLAND.  Pop. 434. Fishing settlement on the west side of Placentia B., a little north of Mortier Bay.

 

            DAWSON’S COVE.  Pop 145. Fishing-farming settlement on the north side of Connaigre B., which lies between Fortune and Hermitage Bays. LT.

 

            DEADMAN’S BAY.  Pop. 86. Fishing-furring-lumbering settlement on the Straight Shore, near Lumsden, which itself lies just north of Cape Freels.

 

            DEADMAN’S COVE.  Pop. 27. Lobstering-fishing settlement just north of Anchor Pt., which itself is the northern boundary of St. Barbe B., St. Barbe coast.

 

            DEEP BIGHT.  Pop. 79. Lumbering-farming-fishing settlement at the head of S.W. Arm of Random Sound, Trinity Bay North. 3 sawmills. 1 radio. POMO.

 

            DEEP COVE.  Pop. 27. Fishing settlement between Presque and Great Bona, about the centre of the west side of Placentia B.

 

            DEER HARBOR.  Pop. 153. Fishing-lumbering settlement on north side of Trinity B., roughly half-way between Random and entrance to Random Sound. 3 sawmills. PO.

 

            DEER ISLAND.  Pop. 100. Fishing settlement off the north side of Bonavista B., 9 m. S.S.W. of Greenspond. 153 m. from St. John’s. Sagona. 2 radios. PO.

 

            DEER LAKE.  Pop. 1,753. Lying on the shore of the lake from which its name derived, this is the home of the giant hydro-electric power house which drives the mill at Corner Brook. It is also the home of a large number of loggers who operate from the camps situated a few miles distant, mainly on the opposite side of the lake. 300 men. In 1939 reconstruction and completion of the Deer Lake-Bonne Bay highway, and erection of a bridge across the Humber River, were commenced. When completed this will connect Corner Brook with Bonne Bay, and open some of the most beautiful and fertile country on Newfoundland. The soil along the Corner Brook-Deer Lake highway is very fertile and considerable farming has developed rapidly. Rail, 373 miles from St. John’s; 174 from Port aux Basques; 32 from Corner Brook; highway, 33 from Bonne B. (Lomond). 8 sawmills. Company Hos. Post. Sav. Bank. 179 radios. PT.

 

            DeGRAU.  Pop. 102. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the south coast of the Port au Port peninsula, inside Cape St. George, and fronting on Bay St. George.

 

            DELBY’S COVE.  Pop. 30. Fishing settlement between Pope’s Hr. and Ireland’s Eye, near the N.E. entrance to Smith’s Sound, Trinity B. North.

 

            DIAMOND’S COVE.  Pop. 146. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the S.W. Coast, beside Rose Blanche.

 

            DILDO.  Pop. 590 (including S. Dildo). Picturesque fishing-farming-lumbering settlement on the south side of Trinity B. here in the 1890s a fish hatchery was operated by the Government. 28 m. by highway from Heart’s Content; 12 from Whitbourne; 63 from St. John’s. 7 sawmills. 25 radios. POMO.

 

            DOCK.  Pop. 125. One of the settlements on the Port de Grave peninsula, nearest to Bareneed, in Conception B.

 

            DOCK COVE.  Pop. 119. Fishing settlement on the south side of St. Brendan’s Island, Bonavista Bay.

 

            DOCTOR’S COVE.  Pop. 31. Fishing settlement between Rencontre E. and Bay du Nord, toward the N.W. head of Fortune B.   

 

            DOG BAY WEST.  Pop. 128. Lumbering settlement just north of Gander Bay in Twillingate district.

 

            DOG COVE.  Pop. 48. Fishing settlement a few miles west of C. La Hune.

 

            DOMINO.  A Labrador fishing settlement beside Spotted Islands. 584 m. from St. John’s. Kyle. Summer wireless telegraph.

 

            DOTING COVE.  Pop. 553. Important fishing settlement on the Straight Shore, most of whose fishermen remove to Peckford’s Island and the Wadham Islands each summer. Most of the people are descended from people who removed here from Bonavista. Lies contiguous to Musgrave Harbor. 237 m. from St. John’s. Sagona.

 

            DOUBLE MERE.  Pop. 26. Furring and salmon settlement on the north side of the Narrows connecting Hamilton Inlet with Lake Melville, Labrador.

 

            DROOK.  Pop. 36. Fishing settlement near S.E. entrance to Trepassey Bay.

 

            DUFF’S.  Pop. 35. Section of Holyrood, q.v.

 

            DUNFIELD.  Pop. 222. Farming settlement on the north side of Trinity B., south of Trinity. 1 sawmill. 2 radios. PO.

 

            DUNVILLE.  Pop. 261. Farming settlement at the head of the N.E. Arm of Placentia. 10 radios. PT.

 

            DURICLE.  Pop. 30. Fishing settlement on the west side of Placentia B., on the promontory of the peninsula which separates Mortier B. from Burin Inlet.

 

            DURRELL.  Pop. 469. Fishing settlement on the north coast of South Twillingate Island. PO.

A

            EASTERN COVE.  Pop. 76. Fishing settlement beside Fogo on Fogo Island.

 

            EASTERN TICKLE.  Pop. 60. Fishing settlement beside Fogo, on Fogo Island.

 

            EASTPORT.  Pop. 345. Farming-lumbering settlement at the head of Salvage B., Bonavista B. Soil is sandy and very fertile. Considerable quantities of strawberries grown. Has one of the best sand beaches in the country. Nearby are Happy Adventure, Sandy Cove, and the new land settlement colony (unnamed). Connected recently by highway with Glovertown, Alexander B. Station on the main railway, 137 m. from St. John’s. Sagona. 1 sawmill. 22 radios. POMO.

 

            EAST ST. MODESTE.  Pop. 34. Labrador fishing settlement just north of West St. Modeste (q.v.) and Pinware (q.v.) in the Straits of Belle Isle.

 

            EDDIE’S COVE.  Pop. 78. Fishing settlement on the Newfoundland side of the Straits of Belle Isle. LT. PO.

 

            EDDIE’S COVE WEST.  Pop. 42. Lobstering-fishing settlement near Port aux Choix, just north of Point Riche, in B. if St. John, on the St. Barbe coast.

 

            ELLIOTT’S COVE.  Pop. 57. Fishing-farming settlement on the western side of Random Island, Trinity B. North. 2 sawmills. 4 radios. POMO.

 

            ELLISTON.  Pop. 863. Old name: Bird Island Cove. Important fishing settlement on the north side of Trinity B., 4 m. south of Cape Bonavista, 5 m. by road fro Bonavista, 10 by road from Catalina. Noted for the native musical talent of many of the people. One of the rarest Newfoundland books, Tocque’s curious “Wandering Thoughts” (about 1840) was written in and concerning this place. 24 radios. POMO.

 

            EMBERLEY’S POND.  Pop. 25. Fishing settlement between Loon B. and Beaverton, on the mainland inside of Coal All and Chapel Islands, south side of N.D.B.

 

            ENGLEE.  Pop. 522. Second largest settlement on the French Shore, with much the same sort of background as Conche (q.v.). An important fishing port both anciently and now. Here are situated the headquarters of the largest mercantile firm on the French Shore. Beothuck Indians frequented here, and many stone implements and utensils have been dug up. A very beautiful place, inside the northern tip of Canada B. Govt. cold storage bait freezer. 458 m. from St. John’s. Northern Ranger. 4 sawmills. 7 radios. PT.

 

            ENGLISH HARBOR.  Pop. 277. Ancient fishing settlement on the north side of Trinity B., north of Port Rexton and Champney’s, south of Port Union. Noted in recent years for the very superior quality of the fish cured here. 7 radios. POMO.

 

            ENGLISH HARBOR EAST.  Pop. 189. Important fishing settlement near north-east corner of Fortune B. 200 m. from Argentia, 323 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo. PT.

 

            ENGLISH HARBOR WEST.  Pop. 334. Important banking and inshore fishing settlement at the S.W. entrance to Fortune B. 250 m. from Argentia, 273 from Port aux Basques.

Customs. 12 radios. PT.

 

            EPWORTH.  Pop. 189. Fishing settlement in Burin, west side of Placentia B. 4 radios. POMO.

 

            EXPLOITS.  Pop. 296. A beautiful settlement near the mouth of the B. of Exploits, N.D.B., on Burnt Island. First settled early in the 18th century as a salmon catching centre. Here lived John Peyton, who led the expedition which captured Mary March, “the last of the Beothucks,” in 1819. 22 m. from Lewisporte, 102 from Twillingate. Clyde. 1 sawmill. 9 radios. Post. Sav. Bank. PT.

F

            FAIR ISLAND.  Pop. 257. Fishing settlement off the north side of Bonavista B., about 8 m. west of Greenspond. 6 radios. PT.

 

            FAIRBANK.  Pop. 62. Fishing settlement in Friday’s B., New World Island, N.D.B. 2 sawmills.

 

            FAMISH COVE.  Pop. 119. Fishing-lumbering settlement in Placentia B., north of Argentia. PO.

 

            FELIX COVE.  Pop. 77. Fishing settlement on the southern coast of the Port au Port peninsula, facing B. St. George from the north. 1 sawmill.

 

            FEMME.  Pop. 76. Fishing settlement at the central head of Fortune B. PO.

 

            FERMUSE.  Pop. 375. An ancient fishing settlement on the Southern Shore. First settled probably in the early 17th century. This place, or Renews or C. Race was to be the rendezvous for the ships of Sir Humphry Gilbert’s expedition in 1593. In 1677 it had 7 dwellings, 9 planters, 5 wives, 2 sons, 1 daughter, 44 fishing servants, 11 boats, 33 hogs. Fortified in the early 18th century. 57 m. by highway from St. John’s. Lighthouse. 1 sawmill. 6 radios. POMO.

 

            FERROLESee New Ferrole).

 

            FERROLE POINT.  Pop. 31. Lobstering-fishing settlement at the N.W. entrance to B. of St. John, St. Barbe.

 

            FERRYLAND.  Pop. 549. The Southern Shore settlement founded as a colony and haven for his Roman Catholic co-religionists by Sir George Calvert, 1st Lord Baltimore, 1621. In 1594 22 English vessels were fishing here. Calvert erected various buildings and stores, and a large stone “mansion,” as well as wharves, fish-flakes and stages. Barley, oats, peas and beans were grown. Calvert did not personally visit Newfoundland until 1627, coming then to investigate the plantation’s affairs. He remained only a few weeks, but came back again in 1628. This time he brought his family, and resided at the mansion. He died in 1632. The royal charter which he had sought to Maryland was granted to his son, Cecil Calvert, the 2nd Lord Baltimore, who founded the present American State of Maryland. In 1754 the Baltimore family renewed their claim to the Newfoundland possessions, without success. They claimed to have spent £30,000 on colonizing Ferryland, building and clearing land. In 1638 Sir David Kirke, having been given a grant to all Newfoundland as it then was (from Trepassey to Cape Bonavista inclusive), and an appointment as Governor, came out with his wife and family and 100 colonists. He took forcible possession of Ferryland and moved into Baltimore’s mansion after dispossessing the second Baltimore’s agent. Kirke ruled with a high hand, and set out to make his fortune by taxing everybody and everything in sight. He was removed in 1640 and replaced by John Downing, Sr., though he revisited Newfoundland several times in the next 12 years. As late as 1673 Lady Kirke and her family were still living at ferryland, as ordinary planters, with 66 fishery servants and 14 boats. In that year Ferryland was plundered by a squadron of 4 Dutch ships. Between then and 1762 the settlement was attacked frequently by the French. In 1705 there were 30 houses and families. Ferryland was the home of the famous Newfoundland hero, Surrogate Robert Carter, the great-grandfather of the late Sir Frederick B.T. Carter, sometime Prime Minister and Chief Justice of Newfoundland. He led the defence of Ferryland against the French in 1762, and played a noble part in the recapture of St. John’s that year, for which services he was awarded the right to fly the White Ensign. In 1677 Ferryland had 8 dwellings, 8 planters, 3 ives, 5 sons, 5 daughters, 112 fishery servants, 27 boats, 22 cattle, 63 hogs. In 1936 a fishermen’s producer-consumer co-operative society was formed. It owns commodious buildings and premises, and a cold storage bait freezer. 48 m. from St. John’s by highway. Lighthouse. Dr. Matthew Dantow, MHO. Customs. 14 radios. POMO.

 

            FISHELL’S.  Pop. 55. Fishing-farming-trapping settlement in B. St. George, about 5 m. south of St. George’s. 1 sawmill.

 

             FISHING SHIPS HARBOR.  Pop. 6. Labrador fishing settlement. 495 m. from St. John’s. Kyle. Summer wireless telegraph.

 

            FISHOT ISLANDS.  Pop. 48. Ancient fishing settlement on the French Shore, south of St. Anthony. To this place come each year numerous fishermen from Green B. 531 m. from St. John’s. Northern Ranger. PT.

 

            FLAT BAY.  Pop. 97. Fishing settlement at the head of B. St. George.

 

            FLAT ISLAND.  Pop. 113. Fishing settlement on the east coast of the Burin Peninsula, about halfway between Mortier B. and Paradise Sound, Placentia B. West. 12 radios. PT.       

 

            FLAT ISLANDS.  Pop. 371. Important fishing settlement in the central part of Bonavista B. A flourishing Labrador fishing schooner centre. 144 m. from St. John’s. Sagona. 10 radios. PT.

 

            FLAT ISLANDS.  Labrador fishing settlement, south of Batteau. 566 m. from St. John’s. Kyle. Summer wireless telegraph.

 

            FLAT ROCK.  Pop. 478. Fishing-farming settlement on the St. John’s shore, 14 m. north of the capital by highway. On the Marine Drive, favourite tourist motor route. 12 radios. PO.

 

            FLATROCK.  Pop. 206. Fishing settlement on the North Shore of Conception B. next north of Freshwater. Birthplace of Dr. H.L. Pottle, prominent Newfoundland educationalist. 5 m. from Carbonear.

 

            FLEUR-DE-LYS.  Pop. 289. Situated on the outer shore of the broad peninsula which separates Green B. and White B., this is an ancient settlement founded by the French in the 16th century. It was frequented by the Beothuck Indians and is the scene of one of the wonders of the Island. There is a cliff from the face of which the aborigines used to hew out their cooking utensils. The markings are hardly less clearly marked now than when they were made. 304 m. from St. John’s. Northern Ranger. 1 sawmill. 1 radio. PT.

 

            FLOWER’S COVE.  Pop. 284. An important fishing settlement on the northern section of the St. Barbe coast, approaching the Straits of Belle Isle. An important industry here is the making of skin-boots. These are made of dressed seal-skins, and usually reach to the knees. Many hundreds of pairs are sold throughout Newfoundland and to tourists on the Northern Ranger. Cottage Hosp. 757 m. from St. John’s; 217 from Humbermouth. Northern Ranger. 4 sawmills. Customs. 23 radios. PT.

 

            FLOWER’S ISLAND.  Birthplace of Hon. Capt. Abram Kean. Lies about 6 m. off Wesleyville, in Bonavista B.

 

            FOGO.  Pop. 1,037. Capital of Fogo Island. An important fishing settlement fist settled about 1700, or possibly a little earlier. Had 215 inhabitants in 1738 and 7 English vessels fished here. The total codfish caught here was 19,000 qtls. Seal oil produced was worth £770, and seal skins £300. One of the pioneers in developing the Labrador fishery, Jeremiah Coughlan, lived here. Fogo Island lay within the French Shore at the time of its founding, and the French fishermen who visited there had frequent quarrels with the few settlers. It was largely this situation which caused the new southern boundary of the French Shore to be shifted farther north, to Cape John, 1713. Although, thanks to its northerly situation, escaped attacked in most of the French invasions from 1700 to 1762, it was frequently victimized by individual French ships of war and around 1775 by American privateers. Fogo was the home of the beautiful and famous Pamela Simms, who married the Irish patriot, Lord Edward Fitzgerald. She was born in a small settlement on the mainland to which many Fogo people used to remove in wintertime. Fogo Island was long a favourite haunt for the Beothuck Indians, who used every year to row out from the mainland in their canoes in search of sea-birds and their eggs. Two of the oldest cemeteries are at Fogo. A quaint epitaph on a headstone in the Anglican cemetery reads: “Here Lieth Ye Body of John Goby Junr. Who died June ye 15th 1763, aged 33 years.

“Affliction sore long time I bore

Physician’s art was vain

Till Death did ease and God did pleafe

To cure me of my pain.”

The oldest headstone here is in the Roman Catholic cemetery. Its inscription reads: “Mary Osborn daughter of Waddam and Mary Osborn dyed August the 14, 1749, aged 14 years.” Fogo as fortified in the 18th century and some old cannon are still here. 129 m. from Lewisporte; 339 from St. John’s. Sagona. Clyde. Bank of Nova Scotia. Dr. S.A. Beckwith, MHO. 1 sawmill. Post. Sav. Bnk. 39 radios. Customs. PT.

 

            FOREST FIELD.  Pop. 26. Fishing settlement between St. Joseph’s and Haricot, at the bottom of St. Mary’s B.

 

            FORREST’S TICKLE.  Pop. 73. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the St. Barbe coast, near St. Barbe.

 

            FORT POINT.  Pop. 11. The point at the south side of the entrance to Trinity Harbor at which the fort for the settlement’s defence was placed in the 18th and 19th centuries. Some of the old cannon are here yet.

 

            FORTEAU.  Pop. 229. Fishing settlement on the Labrador side of the Straits of Belle Isle. First settled probably about 1750 by English-speaking people, but frequented long before that by French. From 1738 to 1800 Jersey fish firms conducted business here and elsewhere in the Straits. At Forteau is pointed out the battlefield on which the Eskimos and Montagnais (or Mountaineer) Indians waged their famous bloody battle. According to tradition the Montagnais here emerged from the interior and made an onslaught upon the Eskimos, or Lowlanders, who were badly routed, the survivors fleeing north. The scene of the battle is visible from the passing steamships. 740 m. from St. John’s; 234 from Humbermouth. Northern Ranger. Customs. PO.

 

            FORTUNE.  Pop. 960. An important bank and inshore fishing settlement on the Western side of the Burin peninsula. Frequented by Basque and French. First settled by the English probably early in the 18th century. In 1714 four families of French fishermen lived there. They had 60 fishery servants and five stages, and produced 1800 qtls. All inhabitants had taken the oath of allegiance to the English King. Fortune is now one of the few remaining ports of importance from which the Bank fishery is operated in Newfoundland. 215 m. from St. John’s; 124 from Argentia; 309 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo. Bacalieu. Nursing Cent. Post. Sav. Bank. Customs. 56 radios. PT.

 

            FORTUNE HARBOUR.  Pop. 365. A very beautiful fishing settlement on the promontory of the New B. peninsula, N.D.B. The inhabitants, nearly all fishermen, are colourful, warm-hearted and witty descendants of the original Irish settlers. 33 m. from Lewisporte. Home. 14 radios. PT.

 

            FOSTER’S POINT.  Pop. 92. Fishing-farming settlement on western end of Random Island, Trinity B. North. 1 sawmill. LT.

 

            FOX COVE.  Pop. 157. Fishing settlement on the outer coast between Mortier B. and Burin Inlet. LT.

 

            FOX HARBOUR.  Pop. 101. Labrador fishing settlement north of Battle Hr.

 

            FOX HARBOUR.  Pop. 432. Fishing settlement on the east side of Placentia B., at the head of Placentia Sound, inside Argentia. 2 sawmills. 9 radios. PT.

 

            FOX ISLAND HARBOUR.  Pop. 203. Fishing-lobstering settlement on the mainland inside of Ramea Islands, S.W. Coast.

 

            FOX ISLAND RIVER.  Pop. 54. Fishing settlement on the coast between the Port au Port peninsula and B. of Islands. 1 sawmill. 6 radios. PO.

 

            FOX ROOST.  Pop. 64. Fishing-lobstering settlement just east of Port aux Basques on S.W. Coast.

 

                        FOXTRAP.  Pop. 596. A prosperous farming settlement at the head of Conception B. Notable as the scene of “the Battle of Foxtrap” at the time of the survey for the then projected railway, 1882. Political opponents of the railway succeeded in persuading many people in that general part of the country that the railway would injure their interests and the people here appeared in a body forcibly to stop the survey.

 

            FRANCIS HARBOUR BIGHT.  Pop. 31. Well-known Labrador fishing settlement, between Port Hope Simpson and Fishing Ship’s Hr., frequented every year by Newfoundland fishermen. 490 m. from St. John’s. Kyle.

 

            FRANCOIS.  Pop. 327. Fishing-lobstering settlement in the bay of same name on S.W. Coast, 9 m. west of Rencontre West. 404 m. from Argentia; 119 from Port aux Basques. Burgeo. 6 radios. PT.

 

            FREDERICKTON.  Pop. 172. Lumbering settlement on the coast between Carmanville and Gander B., in Fogo Dist. 259 m. from St. John’s. Sagona. PO.

 

            FRENCHMAN’S COVE.  Pop. 213. Fishing settlement on the western side of the Burin peninsula, a little south of Garnish. 1 sawmill. 5 radios. PO.

 

            FRENCHMEN’S COVE.  Pop. 122. Fishing settlement in B. of Islands. 1 sawmill. PO.

 

            FRENCHMEN’S ISLAND.  Labrador fishing-furring settlement, north of Hawke’s Hr. H.B. Co. post. 559 m. from St. John’s. Kyle. PO.

 

            FRESHWATER.  Pop. 155. Fishing settlement at Bell Island, in Conception B. First settled about middle of 18th century.

 

            FRESHWATER.  Pop. 372. An ancient fishing settlement close to Carbonear, in Conception B. Notable for the number of professional men it has produced. 56 radios. POMO.

 

            FRESHWATER.  Pop. 33. Farming settlement near Placentia, Placentia B.

 

            FUNK ISLANDS, THE.  These two small islands, which lie about 22 m. off from Cape Fogo in roughly a westerly direction, may be described as being in a general sense the immediate rendezvous of the sealing fleet each spring. From the beginning of the Newfoundland deep-sea seal hunt they have been regarded as a great land-mark. Several marine tragedies have occurred here, and it is supposed that many vessels and even steamships have been lost by running ashore here in snow-storms. These islands were once the haunt of large numbers of the Great Auk, no quite extinct in the world. Visited in 1939 by two English ornithologists to make a count of the Gannets.

 

            FURBY’S COVE.  Pop. 40. Fishing settlement on the eastern side of Hermitage B., about half-way to the bottom.

 

                                                                            -0-

 

 

Transcribed by Peter Godfrey (April 2003)

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