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A Collection of Newfoundland Wills
(C)
William Clark

 

Will of William Clark
from Newfoundland will books volume 2 pages 435-436 probate year 1861

In re
William Clark deceased.

In the name of God Amen.     I William Clark of Fresh Water in Conception Bay and Island of Newfoundland Planter being weak in body but of perfect mind and memory and moreover being desirous that no unpleasant disputes may arise touching the personal and real estate which I may possess at the time of my death do make my last will and testament in manner and form following that is to say First and principally I give my soul into the hands of my blessed Redeemer and my body to the earth from whence it came not doubting a glorious resurrection to eternal life at the last day.    And my worldly possessions I give and bequeath as follows namely The Four hundred pounds which I now have in the Union Bank at Saint John’s it is my will should remain at interest or should that amount be altered by drafts upon the said bank or further deposits thereon and all other monies at interest now belonging to me or that may belong to me at my decease they shall remain undisturbed unless deemed for better security by my executor hereinafter named during the natural life of my beloved wife Sarah Clark And that all incomes benefits and interests thence arising shall be applied to the comfortable support of my said wife or widow so long as she lives, and further it is my will that should the said interests be insufficient to keep and maintain my said wife or widow that my said executor shall from time to time at his discretion draw so much of the principal as he may judge necessary for that purpose it being my earnest wish and desire that my dear wife shall want no means of comfort during her afflicted and infirm old age.    After the decease of my said wife Sarah Clark and all my lawful debts are paid I give and bequeath to my three brothers Moses Clark of Fresh Water and Francis Clark and Joseph Clark residing at Labrador and their heirs for ever the above named sum of four hundred pounds     one third to each to be placed to their account in the said Bank or drawn by my said executor according to the order and direction of my said brothers or their heirs or executors.    Also I give and bequeath all my other estate personal and real and wherever situated that is to say all lands buildings furniture apparel and money not above bequeathed which I may possess at the time of my death to my dear brother Moses Clark aforesaid.     And lastly I hereby constitute appoint and ordain my said trusty brother Moses Clark my sole executor to this my last will and testament    And hereby revoking canceling and utterly disallowing all former wills and bequests by me at any former time or times made and devised I hereby sign seal and pronounce this to be my last and only lawful and testament.    Signed sealed and pronounced at Fresh Water aforesaid this twentieth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty.    William Clark his X mark (LS)     We the undersigned Joseph Peters and Henry Harris hereby certify that we each saw the other sign our respective names and together saw the above named testator William Clark sign seal acknowledge and pronounce the foregoing as his last and only lawful will and testament the same having been first carefully read and explained, Henry Harris, Joseph Peters, Notary Public, Carbonear.

Certified correct,
D. M. Browning
Registrar

 

 

Note: The wills in those will books are NOT actual wills. They are either hand-written copies or in later years typed copies of a, "last will and testament," written or typed by the court clerk, after the death of the testator, when the executor presented them to the court for probate. The court clerk didn't list the signatures at the bottom, he (or she) just put them in the book in whatever order they were in, on the original document, no spacing most of the time, no punctuation. The originals were kept by the executor.

We who have typed these wills, have made every effort to include all the errors that were on the microfilm, in order to avoid destroying the integrity of the originals, where ever they may be.

Page Contributed by Judy Benson & Ivy F. Benoit

Page Revised by Ivy F. Benoit (Wednesday February 20, 2013)

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