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MISC. NEWS ARTICLES & NOTICES
1891 - 1900

 

Evening Telegram

June 3, 1891 (Wednesday)

Elevation of Rev. P. O'Donnell.
With much pleasure the intelligence has been received here, that the Rev. P. O'Donnell has been appointed by the Most Rev. Bishop of Harbor Grace, to be the parish priest of Harbor Main.


Evening Telegram

September 10, 1891 (Thursday)

Judge Prowse Holds Court at Holyrood.
Young Railway Offenders Brought Before His Worship.
Whitbourne, This Afternoon.
The youngsters accused of spiking the railway track at Holyrood, last week, are being tried to-day before Judge Prowse. Hon. E.P. Morris defends the prisoners. Sub-Inspector Sullivan accompanies Judge Prowse.

Annual Festival. The school children of Holyrood are enjoying the annual picnic to-day, and are having a delightful time, the weather being gloriously suitable for the occasion.


Evening Telegram

September 11, 1891 (Friday)

That "Train-Wrecking Case". Holyrood Amply Vindicated.
Judge Prowse, Hon. E.P. Morris, and Sub-Inspector Sullivan returned to town last evening, having disposed of the "train-wrecking" case alluded to in our Whitbourne dispatch of yesterday.

The first part of the day was spent by the Judge and the Inspector in hunting up witnesses at Holyrood, and the afternoon occupied in the hearing and trial of the case. Philip Doyle, aged seven years, was the principal witness. This little fellow testified that he and Philip and Johanna Penney had each placed a spike on the track. Counsel for the accused entered a plea of Guilty for the two Penneys, and the other four children were discharged. It was contended on behalf of the prisoners that the act was not malicious and that the spikes had been placed there merely for idleness, to see what effect they would have on the train while passing over them and flattening them out. The Judge took this into consideration, as also their youth, and liberated them on their friends giving bonds for their future good behavior.

It is a matter of the sincerest congratulation to the people of Holyrood that the good name of the thriving little town has thus been amply vindicated, and that what at first appeared as an attempt to wreck the train, has now turned out to be a mere thoughtless act of some children. Holyrood has suffered much injury, cattle there being continually killed on the track. But the people know that to wreck a train would be no remedy for their sufferings.


Harbour Grace Standard

June 19, 1891 (Friday)

The Railway.
Twenty miles of the Hall's Bay Railway, towards Rantem, are now completed. There are 800 men employed.


Harbour Grace Standard

September 22, 1891 (Tuesday)

The schooner N.P. Christian, belonging to Capt. John Dawe, is on the slip for over-hauling. She will proceed to Labrador for a load of fish for Messrs. John Munn & Co.


Harbour Grace Standard

September 22, 1891 (Tuesday)

Picked up. The schooner P.R.F., while on her way to Bonavista with a load of brick from Trinity Bay, met Saturday's gale, and after a short time succumbed under its effects and sank. The crew had only time to enter a dory, and make their escape from the sinking ship. Fortunately they were descried by the crew of the American banking schooner Nellie M. Davis which signalled to the tug D.P. Ingraham which had their schooner in tow; she bore down and rescued the benighted men. Their names were Capt. Power, John Harding of Holyrood, Nicholas Murphy of Conception Harbor, and William Sampson of Little Placentia. They saved nothing. The P.R.F. was the schooner that collided with the schooner William on the Southern Shore on the 29th July.


Harbour Grace Standard

October 6, 1891 (Tuesday)

Mr. John Barrett of Holyrood, has met with a great loss by the burning of his home and all its contents. Mrs. Barrett was away at the time, and Mr. Barrett was some distance from the house repairing his cellar. Nothing but a barrel of flour and a bed were saved. - Colonist.


Harbour Grace Standard

December 8, 1891 (Tuesday)

Captain Fowlow, of Trinity, takes charge of the S.S. Leopard this spring, and will sail from Greenspond in search of the hood and the harp. This will be the captain's first trip to the icefields in command of a steamer, and his friends wish him abundant success.


Harbour Grace Standard

December 22, 1891 (Tuesday)

Hall's Bay Railway.
Work on the Hall's Bay Railway has been considerably curtailed during the past week or two, numbers of men being daily paid off for the season. During the winter months, about 300 men will be employed on the line, and some 200 or so will be engaged in log cutting, &c. The line has been built and rails laid for about 65 miles, a few miles more are ready for rail laying.

The headquarters of the Company for the winter season is at Shoal Harbor, Trinity Bay, some 14 miles from the bottom of Bonavista Bay. The men returning from work speak in the highest terms of the contractors - Messrs. Middleton & Reid - and also of their officers.


Harbour Grace Standard

March 1, 1892 (Tuesday)

Harrowing Disaster.
12 Men Dead. 11 Missing.
Ugly rumours of a lamentable affair were rife in town all yesterday and to-day. Nothing very definite, however, was known thereament. In order to furnish our readers with full and reliable particulars in respect of what has unfortunately proved to be a most melancholy affair, we went to the trouble of telegraphing a friend in Trinity. His full and accurate response came to hand at 4 p.m.

(Special to the Standard)
Trinity, This Afternoon.
Saturday's casualty is the greatest that ever happened in the history of Trinity. A number of seals had been shot the two or three previous days, and there being every sign of Saturday being fine nearly every man and many boys from all parts of the Bight went out early in search of seals. All went well until about eleven o'clock, when the wind, accompanied by severe frost, suddenly veered from the North-north-east, and increased to a gale. The terrible struggle to reach land, the sufferings of some of the men, and the heart-rending tales told by survivors, baffle description.

Several crews landed near the Horse Chops (the eastern extremity of the bight in which Trinity is situated), but were so exhausted that six of the number perished. Two died before landing, and four immediately after. Several crews landed at Trouty and Bonaventure without loss of life. Among the crews who landed at Ireland's Eye and Thoroughfare, five died from cold and exhaustion. About thirty men escaped to the South Shore of Trinity Bay without loss of life, but badly frost-bitten. They were on the ice all Saturday night.

The schooner Rosecleer [sic], Fowlow, master, went out on Sunday in search of the missing men. She returned this morning bringing sixteen men from Heart's delight, and the bodies of two men picked up in a boat off Scilly Cove. She reports seeing fires on Chapel Head near Norman's Cove. It is thought that some men may be there. The running ice prevented the schooner's crew from landing. Up to the present time there are thirteen men dead and eleven missing. The gravest fears are entertained for their safety.

The dead and missing belong to Salmon Cove, Robin Hood, Ship Cove, English Harbor, and Trinity South.

The steamer Labrador was sighted near Baccalieu this morning. She will go around the Bay in search of the missing. There will be further particulars after she returns. The names of the dead are James Penny, Tobias Penny, Martin Batson, Solomon Penney, William Barnes, Edward Pottle, John Nurse of English Harbor, John Penney, Charles Day of Salmon Cove, William Stockley, Isaac J. Butler of Robin Hood, and Robert Bannister and Charles Bannister of Ship Cove.

The missing are Isaac Batson, William Batson, Arthur Batson, Reuben Pottle, of English Harbor, Henry Nurse, George Nurse, Charles Nurse, William Nurse of Salmon Cove, John Moore, George Moore, Jacob Moore of Trinity South.


Harbour Grace Standard

March 4, 1892 (Friday)

The Trinity Bay Disaster.
The following are the latest particulars received in reference to the deplorable Trinity Bay affair:

We learn from a resident of Heart's Delight a few facts about the men who got ashore at that place and Shoal Harbor on Sunday. The boats containing 16 men reached Heart's Delight at 9 o'clock in the morning. They were frostbitten, and suffered severely from the exposure. The Trinity schooner Roseclear [sic] took these men from Heart's Delight on Monday and conveyed them home.

Another boat was seen off in the ice in the morning, and two boats were at once manned and despatched to the rescue from Heart's Delight. She was reached but all were compelled to make for Shoal Harbour, where they arrived at 4 p.m. on Sunday. The boat contained four men - William Ivany and three sons, of English Harbor - all of whom were badly frostbitten, one of the sons so much that both his legs it is feared, will have to be amputated.

Early on Sunday the men left the ice in which the boat was passed, thinking to reach the shore in her, but she was shut in again, and in their disabled state they were helpless, and could not make further exertion. These men are still at Shoal Harbor.

Further and later particulars are afforded by the following despatches.
Heart's Content, March 1st, 1891 [sic]
From accounts of the survivors they believe the missing men will be found at Deer Harbor or neighborhood. They were all inside the main body of the ice. No sign of the steamer here. All the men from Hearts Delight are gone home. Ivany and his sons are still at Shoal Harbor. Five men are at Hant's Harbor in charge of the Relieving Officer - they are going home the first chance.

Trinity, March 1st.
The frost-bitten men of Saturday's disaster are doing fairly well, and it is expected all will recover. At present there seems very little hope for the missing men; but they may have reached some place not yet heard from. None have died since morning and all landed by Captain Fowlow are in a fair way of recovery.

In reply to the queries, if it is possible that the missing men could be driven so far up the bay at Chapel Head, and if fires had been there yesterday as mentioned in a despatch from Trinity, the following was received.

Rantem, March 1st.
This bight blocked with ice for the last two weeks, the edge being about fifteen miles off here. If the missing men had made fires near Chapel Head, they would have been seen immediately, as there are people living within half a mile. The men here are not searching.

Another despatch says: -
Heart's Content, March 1st.
The five men who landed at Daniel's Cove were in slack ice when the storm came on about 11 a.m. They rowed towards their homes for about an hour and a half, when they got to clear water, and found their boats could not live. They bore back for the southside of the bay, and had slack ice to row through till they got a quarter of a mile from Daniel's Cove when they hauled there boat over the ice and arrived here at 4 p.m. on Saturday. Their clothing was wet and frozen, and they say, in that condition, they could not have lived on the ice till ten o'clock that night. Three of them were in a boat of ten feet keel; the other two in a boat eight and a half feet keel. They saw the punts that put into Heart's Delight, put up sails and steer about west. Also, before the storm came on, they saw four or five boats go to the eastward of them, chasing seals till they got out of sight, and they think that, if those crews were not swamped, they must have driven south, on the ice and perished.

They also spoke to one Henry George Ivany half an hour before the storm sprang up; a nephew of one of them was in the punt with Henry George Ivany. The names of the five (who manned the two punts mentioned and landed at Daniel's Cove) are: Martin Bugden, Edwin Bugden, Francis Barnes, William Penney and James Penney. A Scilly Cove man out hunting yesterday saw a drifting boat down near Heart Point making back and forth, in about a space of three miles, till night fall, when she steamed eastward. The men landed at Heart's Delight have gone home, the mouth of the bay is still jammed with ice.


Harbour Grace Standard

March 4, 1892 (Friday)

Boat Picked Up
A boat was picked up at Carbonear Island yesterday, which is apparently a Trinity Bay built one - being long, narrow and slight timbered. Those who have seen her are of this opinion. There were a man's jumper, a compass and a shot-gut filled with shot. She was stove in two places, and is now in the possession of Mr. Henry Forward, Light-house keeper.


Harbour Grace Standard

March 19, 1892 (Saturday)

The Trinity Relief Fund.
His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint the following gentlemen to collect and distribute the fund subscribed on behalf of the Trinity Bay sufferers, namely: Hon. Sir F.B.T. Carter, K.C.M.G., president; Hon. Sir W.V. Whiteway, K.C.M.G.; Hon. Edward Shea, Hon. James Pitts, Rev. H. Dunfield.
Am't already acknowledged .................. $ 1 577.45.


Harbour Grace Standard

March 25, 1892 (Friday)

The Trinity Sufferers.
William Ivany and his two surviving sons, Walter and Mark, arrived from Shoal Bay [sic] on Saturday last. The two sons were badly frostbitten. The younger, Mark, is doing well and will recover without loss of any part of his feet. The elder, Walter, had both feet badly frozen, the whole of the toes on the left foot are too far gone to save, and were amputated by Dr. White on Wednesday last. The tip of the great toe on the right foot may need to be amputated in a few days. We are pleased to know that the patient is doing well since the operation, and it is hoped that with good treatment, aided by an excellent nerve and constitution, his recovery will be rapid. - Record.
[Note - Mark was my wife's grandfather. - Tom]


Harbour Grace Standard

March 29, 1892 (Tuesday)

Trinity Bay Relief Fund
Rev. H. Dunfield, Secretary and Treasurer of the Trinity Bay Relief Fund has handed us, for publication, a complete list of subscribers received up to date. Three thousand five hundred and eighty-six dollars have been so far subscribed, and it is probable that this amount will be largely increased before the list closes.


The Daily Mail and Empire

Oct 18, 1895

Smuggling in Newfoundland

St. John's, Nfld., Oct 17. - The revelations regarding smuggling show that vast stocks of wine, spirits, tobacco, cigars, tea, sugar, etc., were brought from St. Pierre without the payment of duty. The Revenue Board is appalled at the extent of the revelations, and it is believed would willingly abandon the prosecution now owing to the class of persons involved. Government politiicians are badly frightened at the threats of many supporters of the accused, who threaten to divulge damaging party secrets.
(Contributed by Mavis Garland)


Evening Telegram

January 20, 1896 (Monday)

Personal
We had, this morning, a call from A.E. White, Esq., son of Dr. White of Trinity, who is leaving by next steamer for New York. Mr. White has been studying for the medical profession under his esteemed father, and now leaves for fields and pastures new. While in the great Republic he will spend a period in one of the large hospital colleges, and then go up for his diploma. We sincerely wish him every success, and trust, on his return, he will bring with him all the honors within his reach.


Evening Telegram

February 4, 1896 (Tuesday)

Big Fire at Harbor Main.
House and Contents Consumed.
John Hickey's house was burned down on Saturday night, and all its contents consumed. The children were in charge of the house, and barely escaped with their lives. The mother is dead, and the father is on the railway line log-cutting.


Evening Telegram

February 4, 1896 (Tuesday)

Father Murphy Nearly Killed While Attending Sick Call.
The Rev. Father Murphy, of Holyrood, went to Harbor Main on Friday in response to sick calls. In going around Burnt Head the sleigh tipped over, and he was pitched out and nearly killed. Only he managed to catch a rail, he would have been down over a bank forty feet high. His reverence stayed one night at Harbor Main, and the storm set in on him. He faced back to Holyrood on Saturday evening, a crowd of men, with shovels, preceding him.


Evening Telegram

February 26, 1896 (Wednesday)

In the Police Court.
Albert [****], an ex-employee of C.F. Bennett & Co., was arraigned before Judge Prowse this morning. He is suspected of having stolen a number of Cape Copper Co.'s notes, which are now in circulation for a second time. When first arrested the defendant gave his name as John Harvey; but Mr. Christian of Henry Blair's Water Street establishment positively identified the accused as the party for whom he cashed a scrip order of the Co., dated Oct. 12th, 1892. The police are busy to-day tracing up certain clues which are now in their possession.


Evening Telegram

February 26, 1896 (Wednesday)

Robbed of $83.
William Stapleton, formerly of this town was robbed recently at Summerville, Mass. He with Mrs. Stapleton was returning home, when he was attacked by a man, who struck and caught hold of him. When his assailant left, Stapleton discovered that a pocket-book containing $83 had been stolen from him. - H.G. Standard.


Evening Telegram

April 7, 1896 (Tuesday)

Interested in Mines.
Mr. Coates, engaged by the firm of Munn Brothers, left the city this morning for Harbor Grace. He is interested in two mines, which, it is believed, will soon be worked. One of these mines, of magnetic iron, is at Labrador, the other, of copper, is at Holyrood. Mr. Coates has in his possession, we learn, a big block of the copper.


Evening Telegram

April 9, 1896 (Thursday)

More Mining Matters.
Mr. Wm. Sclater left by the train this morning to look after his mining claim at Chapel's Cove. Also Mr. White, surveyor, who gets off with Conductor Spence to survey the claim, in the same vicinity, held by the Conductor, Mr. A.S. Noble, T.P. Connors and Company.


Evening Telegram

April 10, 1896 (Friday)

Another Able Letter.
From the Rev. Walter B. Smith. ... As for Polar bears, why I have myself seen the skins of more than half a dozen that have been killed in either Trinity, Bonavista or Notre Dame Bays, and killed quite close to the land, too. Only nine years ago this very spring, the Pennys, of English Harbor, in Trinity Bight, shot two young Polar bears on the ice, quite close to English Harbor, and within three miles of the entrance of Trinity Harbor.

My father purchased the skin of one of these bears - they were genuine Polars - and the Rev. Henry Johnson, then at Trinity, bought the other. One walrus at least has been killed in Bonavista Bay within the memory of old people now living.


Evening Telegram

April 10, 1896 (Friday)

Fell in the Hold and Injured.
A laborer, named Michael Earle, of the East-end, working on the S.S. Ulunda, received injuries yesterday. In ascending from the hold he fell down a long distance. Dr. Mitchell attended the man, and ordered him to hospital, where he is in improved condition to-day.


Evening Telegram

April 11, 1896 (Saturday)

Two Men Driven Off. From Western Bay - No Tidings of Them.
(Special to the Evening Telegram)
Western Bay, This Afternoon.
While our people were engaged yesterday getting seals, it looked cheerful, till the sad news got around that two men were driven off. They have not since been heard of. They are Stephen Halfyard, from Ochre Pit Cove, and Fred. Dalton from here. [reported on April 13 that Halfyard got ashore on April 11 - Tom]


Evening Telegram

April 20, 1896 (Monday)

Harbor Main Jottings.
Here are a few Harbor Main district notes, and up to date: -
The Chapel's Cove coal mine is giving good indications and parties connected with it are very hopeful of successful results. The Holyrood copper mines are being explored by Messrs. Davis and Fitzgerald. "What the future will bring forth" promised to be a very hopeful future.

The local constable, Murphy, has found a good iron mine, one supposed to be far superior to the one at Bell Isle. Should the railway and these mines turn out well the people consider that there will be very beneficent results for the district, even to the making of a millionaire - or two.

Meantime, however, much of the speculative dreaming about mines is stripped of its poetic mood by several persons having tried results at fishing. There was a fairly good catch of codfish, for the time of the season. On Friday last, one man, named Hanna [sic, ?Hannon - Tom], caught half a quintal. Jiggers were used.

There is a good showing of fish on the grounds and, also, of herring. Again, several young men and women, of Holyrood, awaiting "the good times coming", left for the United States by recent steamers, to fill in the spare days earning American dollars. They will "wander back again some day" - and be welcome.


Evening Telegram

May 16, 1896 (Saturday)

In the Police Court. ...
McGrath vs. Brien.
This was an action under the new slander law. Both parties are residents of Torbay, and there is an old feud between them. The particular cause of complaint is that the defendant objected to plaintiff's boy driving over a roadway near her house which she claimed was private property. The boy persisted, and when his mother came to see that she didn't strike him a conversazione ensued, which resulted in Mr. McGrath receiving a cold water bath. It took two hours to try this case, which might have been disposed of in five minutes but for technicalities raised by counsel. His Honor, however, preserved his equilibrium splendidly, and terminated the case by fining the defendant 10 cents and costs. An appeal may be taken.


Evening Telegram

May 23, 1896 (Saturday)

House Destroyed by Fire.
At 5 o'clock last evening the house and its contents of Mr. James Wall, Harbor Main, were destroyed by fire. It appears that Wall was warming tar on the stove to give a coat to his cart wheels, and the tar caught fire. In trying to save a few of his effects he got much burnt about the face. The wife had all his and the boy's clothes ready for them to go out on the railway line, and they were all consumed.

Mr. F.J. Morris, M.H.A., and the charitably disposed will do well to interest themselves, as the family have been left destitute. Rev. O'Donnell or Mr. Wm. Murphy will receive donations from friends.


Evening Telegram

May 27, 1896 (Wednesday)

Marine Notes.
The Pansy, 61 tons, 5 men, Thomas Christian, master, has been cleared for Trinity, taking flour, bread, &c.


Evening Telegram

May 30, 1896 (Saturday)

Harbor Main Notes. ...
Mr. Jas. Hawco, one of the enterprising fishermen of Chapel's Cove, is putting out about 200 lobster pots. It seems that he is going to do a good business with the shell fish. He deserves to.


Daily News

June 2, 1896 (Tuesday)

[large picture of tadpole, 3-4 inches long]
The Terra Nova Tadpole.
The accompanying cut represents the "peculiar looking" little animal found by Mr. Redigan, in a bog near Kenney's Pond, on the Cove Road, and which excited so much curiosity on Shea's premises yesterday. It is nothing more nor less than a young frog (a tadpole) in the seventh stage of progression from the egg to a full fledged croaker. As will be seen, the little batrachian has already gained its hind legs. The next step will be to grow the front legs, after which the unwieldly looking tail will gradually become absorbed and the perfect frog will appear. Frogs have been found here on several occasions of late years, but this is the first time we have seen a tadpole. The man who caught it says that there are dozens like it in the same bog, which shows, that even frogs can increase and multiply in this land of fogs and ice blockades. The above picture is life size.

Daily News

June 2, 1896 (Tuesday)

Torbay Items. Gleaned on Sunday.
Last week Patrick Ready lost a fine mare. On going to the stable one morning he found it dead from some unknown cause. It was carted to the edge of a high cliff and thrown over into the sea. Three foals belonging to Messrs. Martin Ryan, Peter Thorne and William Thorne, also perished down there recently. The loss will be sorely felt by these men.

Daily News

June 8, 1896 (Monday)

We learn that the American schooner, Nelly Bly, Capt. Richard O'Neill, arrived at Gloucester on the 22nd ult., with 25,000 cod, 15,000 hake and 10,000 cush. The prices realized were: For the cod and cush, $3.50 per quintal, and for the hake $3.30. Capt. "Dick" is a native of Harbor Grace, and when formerly in command of the schooners Flying Arrow, Thrasher and Mary M., was considered one of our most successful banking captains. His luck seems to follow him under the stars and stripes.

Daily News

June 9, 1896 (Tuesday)

A railroad siding is being built at Harbor Main. This will be a great boom for the people of the locality.

Daily News

June 9, 1896 (Tuesday)

A quantity of Lochleven fry was put into a pond on the back of Harbor Grace. Another lot were let loose in the neighborhood of Salmon Cove.

Daily News

June 16, 1896 (Tuesday)

A new church is about to be built by Rev. Father Murphy at Holyrood. A large quantity of stone, with sills, uprights, etc., have already been got out, but the exact site has not yet been decided on.

Daily News

June 29, 1896 (Monday)

A young man named Christian while taking a walk in the direction of Chain Rock yesterday afternoon, stooped down to get a drink from a sping well on the hill-side. Having imbibed the cooling draught, he was rising up when there came a splash in the water, caused by a large bull-frog which had sprung from a ledge of rock above the well. He captured the batrachian and brought it home. This is the first frog we have heard of on Signal Hill.

Daily News

June 30, 1896 (Tuesday)

We notice by a late exchange that Capt. Denis O'Neill, brother of the well known banking master "Capt. Dick" O'Neill, recently landed at Gloucester 111,000 fish, as his first trip of the season. The two brothers seem determined to keep up their record and sustain the honor of Harbor Grace, their native city.

Daily News

July 29, 1896 (Wednesday)

The fishery out-look at Harbor Main is exceedingly gloomy. Ten qtls. is reported as the entire catch for the season.

Daily News

July 30, 1896 (Thursday)

A Popular Doctor.
Dr. Freebairn has built up an extensive practice in Harbor Main district. At first it included the South Shore and northwards to Harbor Main. But he has pushed further northward; and now has a number of patients at Salmon Cove and Conception Harbor. The Doctor has been very successful in the treatment of his patients and the fullest confidence is reposed in him along the line. He has a surgery at Mr. Jas. Lewis', Holyrood, where he may be consulted every Saturday.

Daily News

August 19, 1896 (Tuesday)

The mills at Shoal Harbour have been doing very little for some time past. Owing to the rivers being almost dried up, the owners have been unable to procure sufficient water to drive the machinery. The dams occasionally get filled up, and then they run them out which gives a little employment. The same may be said with regard to Exploits River, Kitty's Brook and Grand River, which also show the drought.

Daily News

September 2, 1896 (Wednesday)

A Railway Accident.
A serious railway accident occurred near Bay St. George on last Friday. A working train comprising three cars bearing nearly 100 men, was going to the scene of work when a cow was seen on the track, and before the engine could be stopped the cars, which were in front, struck the cow and derailed the train. Men were thrown in every direction. John Hawco who came in by yesterday's train fell under one of the cars and had his leg broken below the knee. Another man named Jno. Tubrett, of Holyrood, C.B., also got nipped in the cars and his leg broken near the thigh. The latter was in too weak a condition to be sent on, the others were not so seriously hurt.

Daily News

September 2, 1896 (Wednesday)

Published by Authority.
His Excellency the Governor in Council has been pleased to appoint Rev. E.K.H. Caldwell, and Messrs. Frederick Woodman, William Hefford, New Harbor; Albert George, John Pretty, Dildo; Stephen Bennett, Green's Harbor; Josiah Williams, Broad Cove, to be the Church of England Board of Education for the Educational District of New Harbor; also Rev. E.K.H. Caldwell, and Messrs. William Pike, South Dildo; William Day, Old Shop; Robert Hillier, Spreadeagle; Jacob Smith, Norman's Cove; Thomas Drover, Bay Bull's Arm; and Thomas Warren, Chance Cove, to be the Church of England Board of Education for the Educational District of Norman's Cove.
Secretary's Office, Sept. 1, 1896.

Daily News

September 3, 1896 (Thursday)

The unfortunate man Hawco who received injuries in the late railway accident, was in a precarious position last evening. His wife was telegraphed for and arrived by last evening's train, to see him before his painful life terminates.

Daily News

October 2, 1896 (Friday)

A gentleman who came from Torbay yesterday morning said that, when passing Denis Brien's house, about 5 miles from town, he saw a number of men on the roof endeavoring to keep down the flames that were bursting through. After some time the fire was got under. He did not know how the fire occurred or what damage had been done.

Daily News

October 6, 1896 (Tuesday)

Rev. Father Murphy, of Holyrood arrived back from Maule Bay, Riverhead, and Salmonier on Thursday where he had been attending a number of sick calls of an urgent nature.

Daily News

October 8, 1896 (Thursday)

At Holyrood.
There was a grand evening party held in the Holyrood High School Tuesday night last, under the control of the Sunday School Committee. Miss M.B. Lewis managed the affair, and it was a great success. Fully fifty people were present and enjoyed themselves splendidly after supper in making speeches, singing songs and tripping the "light fantastic toe" till broad daylight. A number of outside visitors were present.

Evening Telegram

August 3, 1898 (Wednesday)

At Holyrood. - There are now at Holyrood twelve Nova Scotia bankers getting bait. Bait is very plentiful and a good sign of fish is reported.


Evening Telegram

August 13, 1898 (Saturday)

Holyrood Notes.
At Holyrood there are five American, one Lunenberg, and one St. Pierre banker looking for bait. Squid is very scarce in Conception Bay just now. Twenty-four bankers are at Carbonear awaiting bait. Among the high liners is Capt. Davis Morrissey, in the schooner Meteor, just back from home after landing a full load of fish. The schooner Bessie, Capt. A. Devine, is nearly filled to the hatches. Capt. Morrissey, in the schr. Essex, has also done good work, and bids fair to uphold the name of the Morrisseys. Capt. Choon, in the schooner Arbutus, and Capt. Oscar Lyons, in the B. Monroe, are also here well fished.


Daily News

August 22, 1898 (Monday)

The remains of William Mason, of Conception Harbor, who died at Crow's Nest, were landed at Salmon Cove on Saturday. Death resulted from pneumonia.


Daily News

August 14, 1898 (Wednesday)

The North Arm copper mine near Woodford Station is owned by Mr. George Keough, Water St. West, and Messrs. Penny Bros., of Woodford.


Daily News

October 2, 1896 (Friday)

A gentleman who came from Torbay yesterday morning said that, when passing Denis Brien's house, about 5 miles from town, he saw a number of men on the roof endeavoring to keep down the flames that were bursting through. After some time the fire was got under. He did not know how the fire occurred or what damage had been done.


Daily News

October 5, 1898 (Wednesday)

Fell from a Scaffold.

Mr. John Dawe while repairing the roof of Mr. Christian's house, on Pleasant Street, yesterday had a narrow escape from being severely injured. The scaffold on which he stood gave way, and he fell to the ground, some twenty feet below, and, strange to say, outside of receiving a severe shaking up he was not seriously injured. He was picked up in an unconscious state and conveyed to his home nearby, where he speedily recovered.
[This is the home of Archibald Humphrey Christian, who was living at 86 Pleasant St. in 1902.]


Daily News

October 6, 1898 (Thursday)

Published by Authority.

The following persons have been appointed as Agricultural Surveyors under the Rules and Regulations adopted by His Excellency the Governor in Council, under the authority of the Act Vic. 61, Cap. 33, entitled "An Act for the Encouragement of Agriculture": -

District of Harbor Main: Joseph Miller, Richard Woodford and Maurice Wade (Capt.)

District of Port-de-Grave: George Makinson

District of Fogo: John W. Webb, John B. Wheeler and Thos. J. Lucas

District of Trinity: Aubrey J. Crocker, Samuel Hussey, Richard Williams, Jas. S. Butler, William Flynn, Robt. W. Stowe, Wm. P. Hefford, Wm. L. Haddon, Elisha Button, Reuben Sparkes

District of Carbonear: John L. Noel and George A. Moulton

District of Bay-de-Verde: Richard E. Halfyard, Joseph Morris and Andrew Moores

District of Harbor Grace: B.B. Squires and Herbert Gosse

Humber River and Howley: Albert Bayly

St. John's West: William Ireland and Solomon Tucker.

Thos. C. Duder

Minister of Agriculture and Mines


Daily News

October 6, 1896 (Tuesday)

Rev. Father Murphy, of Holyrood arrived back from Maule Bay, Riverhead, and Salmonier on Thursday where he had been attending a number of sick calls of an urgent nature.


Daily News

October 8, 1896 (Thursday)

At Holyrood.
There was a grand evening party held in the Holyrood High School Tuesday night last, under the control of the Sunday School Committee. Miss M.B. Lewis managed the affair, and it was a great success. Fully fifty people were present and enjoyed themselves splendidly after supper in making speeches, singing songs and tripping the "light fantastic toe" till broad daylight. A number of outside visitors were present.


Evening Telegram

November 4, 1898 (Friday)

Harbor Main Notes.
William Kennedy, Esq., the local Liberal merchant, has done well at the fishery this season. The John Prince secured a bumper trip. Well done, William! My success crown your efforts in the good old Liberal cause.


Evening Telegram

November 15, 1898 (Tuesday)

The Photographer. - Mr. Jas Vey, photographer, returned to town yesterday from Holyrood, where he had been engaged taking several views of the place. He proceeds on Thursday next to Bell Isle, where he purposes giving a magic lantern and photograph entertainment.


Evening Telegram

December 30, 1898 (Friday)

Mr. Wm. Power, teacher at Dunnville [sic], is in town spending his Christmas holidays.


Daily News

January 21, 1899 (Saturday)

Well Done Captain Taylor.

Mr. James Foote of Queen Street has lately received a letter from his nephew Capt. Orestes Taylor, who notwithstanding his heavy loss of last year at Halifax when his vessel was wrecked, is again on his feet and has purchased the fine schooner B.C. Borden, 415 tons register. This vessel will carry a cargo equal to 750 tons dead weight, cost $11,000 and is only four years old. The B.C. Borden sails shortly from St. John N.B. for the Canary Islands with a load of lumber. We have in Capt. Taylor another illustration of the ability of our Newfoundland men to surmount obstacles and push ahead in the world, and we cordially congratulate him at the same time wishing him continued and increased prosperity.


Daily News

January 28, 1899 (Saturday)

Mr. J. Lewis, of Holyrood, came in to town by yesterday morning's train to undergo medical treatment for his eyes, he was examined by Dr. Rendell but nothing could be done for him.


Daily News

February 25, 1899 (Saturday) (Wednesday)

The remains of the late William Curtis which were brought from Boston were sent out on the regular train yesterday afternoon to Holyrood. Mr. Curtis was a young man only 21 years of age. Mr. Frank Walsh accompanied the remains out.

 

 

Page Contributed by Tom Hynes

Page Revised by Ivy F. Benoit (Wednesday February 20, 2013)

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