Share/Save/Bookmark

Presented by the
Newfoundland's Grand Banks Site
to assist you in researching your Family History

Click on the graphic below to return to the NGB Home Page
Newfoundland's Grand Banks

To contribute to this site, see above menu item "About".

These transcriptions may contain human errors.
As always, confirm these, as you would any other source material.

MISC. NEWS ARTICLES & NOTICES
1881 - 1890

 

 

September 12, 1883 (Wednesday)

A Sad End. - Mr. John T. Walsh was drowned on Saturday night last by falling into the water at the wharf of Messrs. Harvey & Co. The body of the poor fellow was picked up on Monday morning. The deceased was a son of Mr. Patrick Walsh of St. Mary's. A Magisterial inquiry, held before Judge Conroy, returned a verdict of accidental death.


Royal Gazette

November 11, 1884 (Tuesday)

The Election of Harbor Main resulted in the return of Mr. John Veitch, of Holyrood. The Poll stood - Veitch, 586; Emmerson, 296; Holden, 188.


Evening Mercury

January 16, 1885 (Friday)

Two men, named Caldwell and Reddy respectively, fell from a scaffold while working at Gemmell's Foundry. Caldwell was injured so severely that he died this morning, and Reddy was injured seriously but not fatally.


Evening Mercury

June 9, 1885 (Tuesday)

Four Schooners Lost at Holyrood.
Two at Chapel's Cove.
Two at Harbour Main.
(Special to the Evening Mercury).
Holyrood, June 8
.
At twelve on Saturday night wind veered to north east. About daylight it rose to a perfect gale. Four fishing schooners at Holyrood, two at Chapels Cove and two at Harbour Main became total wrecks. Six of them were fitted out for the summer's fishery, and were prepared to start immediately. These losses will be seriously felt here and in the adjoining harbours. The shore around is completely strewn with wreckage showing that the storm has created great destruction on the outside coast. This is the heaviest gale experienced here since September '46.


Evening Mercury

June 17, 1885 (Wednesday)

The train killed a woman at Indian Pond to-day, and policemen have been sent to ascertain the particulars.


Evening Mercury

June 18, 1885 (Thursday)

The woman killed near Indian Pond yesterday was named Mrs. Morgan, and she leaves a husband and nine children. A construction train was backing past a fish flake at a slow rate of speed, and the woman, who attempted to cross the track, was caught by the rear car and terribly mangled, one of her legs being severed from her body and her face disfigured.


Evening Telegram

January 9, 1886 (Saturday)

A number of important fishery cases were tried before Judge Prowse at Holyrood on Thursday last and yesterday. The most noteworthy was the suit of the crew of a banking schooner against James Joy, of Holyrood, the owner for the recovery of various amounts of money, the difference between the value of a low classification of the staple and a high classification thereof - the crew contending that they were entitled to the price of the latter, because the inferiority was caused by negligent handling while curing by defendant, Joy. They also dispute the charge for freight. Defendant sets up a receipt in full, given by the crew to the merchant receiving the voyage. There are nine cases, all of the same kind, against Joy. The magistrate (Judge Prowse) reserved his decision, which will be a written one, the case involving some novel points. Mr. Carty for plaintiff; Mr. Horwood for defendant.


Royal Gazette

April 27, 1886 (Tuesday)

Published by Authority.
His Excellency the Governor, in Council, has been pleased to appoint Revd. Richard Walsh, to be a member of the Road Board for Fortune Harbor, District of Twillingate.
Secretary's Office, 27th April, 1886.


Evening Telegram

May 25, 1886 (Tuesday)

The Mineral Deposits of Harbor Main.

Dear Sir,
Since my last letter to you, I had the pleasure of visiting North Arm mine, Holyrood, now worked by Mr. Dixon. There are seven miners working there, on mixed lode of grey copper six feet in width. The lode lies in twisted slate, charged very much with native copper and small veins of grey copper. The prospect of this mine is extremely good, as a twisted lode seldom or ever fails.

From North Arm nine, by the kindness of a friend as guide, I went to see Captain Fitzgerald's mine, on the Brook in the Silver Valley, about two miles from Harbor Main. This mine has a very good surface show. I saw a vein of grey copper three inches solid running N.E. and S.W.; also a mixed lode of yellow copper in spar about ten feet in width, crossing the river; true bearing of lode E. and W. This property is worth developing.

My next visit was to Holden's Farm mine. Here I saw a lode of yellow copper and iron pyrites twenty-seven feet in width, in chloretic slate, and about two hundred and fifty feet east of the copper lode. There is a vein of solid magnetic iron, three feet in width, running east and west up the side of the mountain for a considerable distance. I also saw several veins of chrome and hematite iron near the mountain, in decomposed rock. About three hundred yards south of the copper lode, in a hill running east and west, I broke the rock and found galena and silver in it. On enquiry I was told that galena and silver is very plentiful in this valley.

My next visit will be to Salmon Cove, and I shall report indications there.

Thanking you, Mr. Editor, for your valuable space, I remain yours truly,

A MINER

Holyrood, May 24.


Weekly Record, Trinity

September 8, 1886 (Wednesday)

It affords us pleasure to be able to congratulate this community on the possession of a Coastal Wharf, which was completed a short time since. The only wonder is how this old and important town was so long deprived of such an obvious desideratum, as that referred to. Although the harbor of Trinity in point of size and safety is unique, yet great inconvenience has been experienced in the past by the traveling and business public, owing to the lack of a suitable wharf for the steamer to land freight and passengers.

In fact, some two years ago, on a dark and stormy night, we witnessed not only the inconvenience but positive danger that attended the transit of passengers from the Plover to the shore; and we think the same might be said with regard to the shipping of freight. Now, however, we have a different state of things. Passengers can land safely and easily; the public have easy access to the steamer, for the attending to freight, etc., as well as an opportunity of meeting with acquaintances and friends. The wharf is substantially built, and well-finished, and reflects great credit on those who have had the managing of the project.


Royal Gazette

September 28, 1886 (Tuesday)

Published by Authority.
His Excellency the Governor, in Council, has been pleased to appoint ... Messrs. Wm. Beston (of Mark), English Hr., Joseph Butler (of Jas.), Robin Hood, to be members of the Church of England Board of Education for Trinity Bay, North, in the place of Rev. B. Smith and John Beston, left the District; ...
Secretary's Office, September 28th, 1886.


General Commercial Gazette

September 29, 1886 (Wednesday)

Collision Off Sugar Loaf. A skiff sunk and four lives lost. [Long account of a collision between the schooner Summerset, 60 tons, Philip Ridout, master, and the fore-and-after Mary Ann, 17 tons, coming from Northern Bay. The Mary Ann had 23 men and 1 woman on board, and was sunk in the collision. The dead were Charles Wicks, 50, with wife and family; Nicholas Milley, 30, wife; Leander Milley, 17, single; and Sarah Jane Fahey, 45, husband but no children. The 3 men belonged to Burnt Point, and Mrs. Fahey to Gull Island.

The survivors from Burnt Point were Charles Milley, married; Jasper Wicks, married; Thomas Tucker, married; Charles Tucker, married; Andrew Milley, single; and John Davis, married.

The survivors from Gull Island were Sam Stockwood, married; John Oliver, married; Bartlett Oliver, single; Patrick Hogan, married; Mark Delaney, married; John Doyle, married; James Doyle, married; Peter Doyle, married; Michael Percy, married; Wm. Oliver, married; Thomas Fahey, married (husband of the woman who drowned); Gregory Leamon, married; and Leander Stockwood, married.


Royal Gazette

October 26, 1886 (Tuesday)

We learn by telegraph from Holyrood to-day that Messrs. R.L. Mare and John Martin arrived there by train with a large case of live black game. They proceeded towards Salmonier and thence into the woods to set the birds - Mercury, Oct. 21.


Weekly Record, Trinity

November 4, 1886 (Thursday)

A Sad Shipping Accident. - The schooner Mary Brown, Newell, master, was lost at Baccalieu on the night of the gale of the 23rd ult., and sad to relate, three men and one woman perished. The vessel struck on a place called Whales Rock and in a few minutes went to pieces. The names of the unfortunate ones are Harris, Mash, Bernan, and Miss Chievers, Roman Catholic teacher of Plate Cove.The craft was bound from St. John's to Indian Arm.


Weekly Record, Trinity

November 25, 1886 (Thursday)

Missionary Meetings, in connection with the Methodist Church, have been held here and at English Harbor the past week. The meeting which took place here on the evening of Tuesday last was well attended. The chair was taken by Mr. Geo. Christian, who gave a short address, and was followed by the Revs. J.T. Newman, J.B. Heal, and the pastor, Rev. G. Paine. As we expect a full report of these interesting meetings, it is sufficient for the present to say, that we think the meeting was a success in every particular.


Weekly Record, Trinity

December 9, 1886 (Thursday)

Methodist Missionary Anniversaries.

English Harbor.

The Annual Missionary Meeting was held in English Harbor Church on Monday Nov. 22nd, and was well attended. ...

Mr. Wm. Bugden was next called to the chair, and delivered a practical speech....

Two short addresses having been given by Messrs. K. Bugden and Jno. Barnes; ...


Weekly Record, Trinity

December 9, 1886 (Thursday)

On Tuesday evening a meeting was held in Trinity and was well attended. ...

The Superintendent next called upon Mr. George Christian to preside, who in his address feelingly and proudly told the story of own of his own craft, "Wm. Carey the shoemaker who became the successful Indian Missionary." A fact showing one exception to the rule that "the cobbler should stick to his last."


Weekly Record, Trinity

March 23, 1887 (Wednesday)

A singular accident, whereby a young man and a boy narrowly escaped drowning, happened a short time ago at Ireland's Eye. Two sons of Mr. Thos. Hodder, of the above place, were crossing the harbor in a punt, the elder of whom was sculling. When they reached to within a few yards of the shore, a squall struck their boat, which had no sail, and ripped it so that it took in a little water. The boat had hardly recovered from the first shock, when another still heavier squall pitched upon it, turning it completely over and throwing the occupants into the water. The accident was seen from the shore, but, as there was new ice about, a quarter of an hour elapsed before the unfortunate fellows could be rescued.

During this time the little boy aged 10 years became so fatigued that he was unable to hold on longer to the boat, and would have sunk, but for the assistance of his elder brother, who held him with one arm, while with the other he held the boat.


Weekly Record, Trinity

April 2, 1887 (Saturday)

The coasting schooner Lizzie, Thomas Christian, master, left here for St. John's yesterday morning. Mr. R.B. Bremner and Mrs. Bremner went passengers on her.


Weekly Record, Trinity

April 9, 1887 (Saturday)

The schr. Lizzie, Thomas Christian, master, arrived here from St. John's yesterday, with a general cargo. She brought the following passengers: - Mrs. Adams; Messrs. Campbell, Dooling, and Gardiner.


Weekly Record, Trinity

May 14, 1887 (Saturday)

The schr. Mary D. arrived here from St. John's on Sunday last with a general cargo, and the following passengers: - Mrs. Laurenson, Mrs. Jenkins, Mr. Barnes....

The coasting schr. Lizzie arrived here from the capital yesterday, with a cargo of goods for the firm of Messrs. Walter Grieve & Bremner.Mrs. Crocker, Mr. Hall were passengers by her.


Royal Gazette

May 24, 1887 (Tuesday)

The schooner Delta, of Catalina, Jeans, Master, and owned by Messrs. Job, Brothers & Co., while beating in the Narrows, on Sunday morning, misstayed and ran ashore under the Southern Head, and became a total wreck. The crew were saved.


Weekly Record, Trinity

May 28, 1887 (Saturday)

The schooner Lizzie, Capt. Thomas Christian, left port for the capital last night. Miss E. Stoneman went passenger by her.


Weekly Record, Trinity

June 11, 1887 (Saturday)

The coasting schooner Lizzie left here for the Capital on Thursday last, taking the following passengers: - Mrs. Spurrel, Mr. Jas. Verge.


Harbour Grace Standard

June 11, 1887 (Saturday)

By Authority. - ...
His Excellency the Administrator of the Government in Council, has been pleased to appoint ... Messrs. George H. Bussey, James Moore, Isaac Richards, Jacob Bartlett, John R. French, William Jas. Thompson, Richard Newell, Richard Morrissey, William Richards, to be a Board of Road Commissioners for North River and Bareneed; ... - Gazette.


Weekly Record, Trinity

June 18, 1887 (Saturday)

Two Men Drowned. - The schooner Zebra, Capt. Hynes, arrived at Catalina on Thursday from the Banks, bringing the sad intelligence that two of her crew had been drowned by the upsetting of a dory. It seems that the crew were out attending to the trawls, and upon all the dories returning to the vessel, except the one in which the two ill fated men were, a boat went in search of them and discovered the missing dory turned bottom up, but the unhappy occupants had sank to rise no more.

The names of the drowned men are Samuel Hynes and Richard Dewling. The former was a cousin to the captain of the Zebra, and a brother to Captain Hynes of the Blooming Dale. The latter belonged to the adjacent settlement of Trouty.


Weekly Record, Trinity

June 25, 1887 (Saturday)

The schr. Lizzie, Thomas Christian, master, arrived here on Sunday last from the Capital. Mr. M. Williams and Mrs. Williams were passengers hither.


Weekly Record, Trinity

July 2, 1887 (Saturday)

The schooner Sarah, Capt. Henry George Barnes, arrived here from St. John's on Sunday last, having on board the Rev. W. Graham, and Mr. A. Milroy, of St. John's. Those gentlemen intend visiting different parts of this Bay, and left by the Sarah on Monday morning en route thereto.


Weekly Record, Trinity

July 9, 1887 (Saturday)

The schr. Lizzie, sailed to St. John's yesterday evening. She took the following passengers: - Mrs. Crocker, Miss Moore, Mrs. Lawlor, Messrs. Emerson, J. White, G. Hart, D.C. Webber.


Weekly Record, Trinity

July 18, 1887 (Monday)

The schr. Lizzie, Capt. Thomas Christian, arrived here from St. John's on Thursday last, with a cargo of merchandise. The undermentioned persons were passengers by her: - Misses Ivany, Hurdle, Bayley, Mrs. Lawlor, Messrs. James White, G. Hart, D.C. Webber, Masters John Eagan, Elton White, John Murphy.


Weekly Record, Trinity

July 23, 1887 (Saturday)

The schr. Lizzie left here yesterday for the Capital, taking the following passengers: - Misses Levisconte, Wiseman, Hiscock, Beasant, Mercer, Mills, Ivany, Messrs. S. Morris, R. Mills.


Colonist

July 26, 1887 (Tuesday)

The schooner Lizzie, Captain Thomas Christian, sailed for Trinity this morning. The Capt. expects to get back in four five [sic] days to this port, when he will load with provisions and start for Bonavista Bay, to take the first cargo of dry fish of the season to St. John's. The following passengers went by her: - Mrs. Cook and two children, Mrs. Curling and Master Vey.


Colonist

August 12, 1887 (Friday)

The Placentia Railway. Arrival of the Rails per Steamer Washington City from England. The steamship Washington City arrived here this morning, at 10 o'clock with twenty-six miles of steel rails for the Placentia branch of the railway. Now that the rails have arrived, the work of construction will be pushed rapidly forward, and it is contemplated that railway communication with the "ancient capitol" will be opened about Christmas day. We congratulate the people of the western districts, and the country at large, on the near approach of the completion of this great and useful public work, and we hope, ere long, to see the railway to the north undertaken on the same patriotic lines and with the same energy that characterized the promoters and advocates of the Placentia branch.


Weekly Record, Trinity

August 20, 1887 (Saturday)

A Man Drowned. - A fisherman, named Elias Pottle, belonging to English Harbor, was drowned near the Horse Chops, on Tuesday, the 9th inst. The precise circumstances of the sad accident are not known, as the poor fellow was alone in the boat, and no person witnessed the death. It is surmised, however, that by striking on a rock, or some other accident, the boat upset, casting its unhappy occupant into the treacherous sea, and no help being at hand he perished. His body was recovered the next day. The unfortunate man leaves a wife and two children to mourn their irreparable loss.


Weekly Record, Trinity

August 20, 1887 (Saturday)

The coastal steamer Plover, Captain Manuel, arrived here on Tuesday with mails, freight and passengers for the northern ports. The passenger list was as follows:- Bay-de-Verde - Messrs. Christian, Ryan, March, Mrs. Christian, Miss Christian, Miss Lockyer, Master Lewis.


Weekly Record, Trinity

August 27, 1887 (Saturday)

The schooner Sarah, Capt. Henry George Barnes, arrived from St. John's yesterday with a general cargo. The following were passengers by her to this port: - Mrs. Lockyer, Mrs. Collis, Miss R. White, Rev. W.J. Lockyer, Messrs. S. Morris, R. Mills.


Weekly Record, Trinity

August 27, 1887 (Saturday)

Messrs. S. Morris and R. Mills, two of our respected citizens, who left here in July to visit some friends at Montreal, returned home yesterday. We are pleased to learn that the trip was fraught with much pleasure to both of them.


Weekly Record, Trinity

September 10, 1887 (Saturday)

The schooner Lizzie, Capt. Christian, arrived here from Bonavista Bay on Thursday, with a part cargo dry fish, to Messrs. Walter Grieve & Bremner.


Harbour Grace Standard

September 10, 1887 (Saturday)

Mr. Joy's schooner Primo, Capt. Morrissey, arrived at Holyrood, with between three and four hundred quintals fish. Capt. Morrissey lost anchor and part of cable and the vessel is somewhat damaged by Friday's storm.


Weekly Record, Trinity

September 17, 1887 (Saturday)

The Rev. W. Weaver on Friday took passage in the schooner Lizzie, Capt. T. Christian, for Salmon Cove, Conception Bay. Mr. Weaver has been officiating for the past two months at St. Paul's of this town, and has now returned to his own Mission at Salmon Cove.


Colonist

September 20, 1887 (Tuesday)

Arrival of Schr. Sunbeam. Sights an Abandoned Schooner on Banks. The banking schooner Sunbeam, belonging to Mr. John Joy, of Holyrood, Capt. James Whelan, arrived here this morning from the banks, with 300 qtls. Of fish. The captain says that the gale of Saturday night was something tremendous, though his vessel sustained no damage. He was under sail when the storm came on, and "laid to" under small canvas till it subsided. He saw the schooners Eugene McMillan and J.W. Roberts on Saturday, and though he did not speak them, he says they were all right. On September 6th, while the Sunbeam was riding at her anchors, a wrecked schooner drifted by her. Her stern was under water, and both her spars were gone from the deck, and her rigging was hanging over the side. As she drove past, the captain perceived her name on her bowsprit, which was over water; it was the Ocean Friend. The vessel appeared to be American built, and looked to be about seventy tons. At the time the wreck was seen, the Sunbeam was anchored in lat. 46.26, lon. 49.26. The name of the place to which the Ocean Friend belonged, and which was evidently on her stern, under water, could not be ascertained.


Colonist

September 21, 1887 (Wednesday)

The banking schooner Ocean Friend, which was reported yesterday as having been dismasted and drifting on the Banks, by Capt. Whalen [sic], of the Sunbeam, belonged to Messers. Duff & Palmer, of Carbonear, and was commanded by Capt. Edward Penny, of the same town. The ill-fated schooner had sixteen men on board.


Colonist

September 26, 1887 (Monday)

Loss of the Ocean Friend. Feelings of Sadness in Carbonear. (To the Editor of the Colonist). Carbonear, Sept. 23rd, 1887. Sir, - You will, no doubt, be sorry to learn that a feeling of sad gloom hangs over our town, owing to the loss of the Ocean Friend - a schr. of some 80 tons. The vessel, which was only a little over six years old, and of American build, left for the bank fishery about eight weeks ago, having on board fourteen men and a boy (not sixteen as reported in your columns Wednesday). ...

On the 15th inst., a telegram was received from Burin by the owner, W. Duff, Esq., of the firm Messers Duff & Balmer [sic], stating that the schooner was lost on the Grand Bank. This report was confirmed on the 21st, by Capt. Moore, of the schooner Lizzie, of Heart's Content, who stated he was on board the wreck on the 6th; but no bodies were to be seen. ...

In consequence of this calamity, ten poor women are left widows, and twenty-four children fatherless. ...

The names of the crew are as follows: - Robert Wareham, of Salmon Cove, Conception bay, who leaves an aged mother, a wife and six children. This man's brother was lost with wife and family on the White Bear Islands, two years ago. Simon Luther, of Carbonear, leaves a widow and three children. Robert Penny (Carbonear), a widow and five children. His son, a boy of fourteen, was also lost. Thomas Howell (Carbonear), a widow and two children; Thomas Clark (Carbonear), a widow and four children; Reubin Pike (Carbonear), a widow and two children; Jourdain Pike (Carbonear), a widow and one child; Richard Penny (Carbonear), a widow and one child; William Penny (Carbonear), and Noah Hull, of Trinity Bay, each leaves a widow. Reubin French, Thomas Power, Nehemiah Ash, and Edward Penny (captain), all of Carbonear, were unmarried.

To add to the sadness of this recital, two of these poor women are shortly expecting an addition to their poor fatherless families. The eldest of the children is not more than twelve years of age. ...
John Goodison
Jno. W. Vickers. ...


Colonist

October 7, 1887 (Friday)

Captain Joy Arrives at Holyrood. 450 Quintals More Recorded. Holyrood, to-day. Capt. Walter Joy, of schooner James C. Saint, arrived here from the Banks yesterday, with four hundred and fifty qtls. of fish. Capt. Joy reports fish plentiful on the Banks and weather fine, but bait scarce. He took the greater portion of his catch on salt squid.


Weekly Record, Trinity

October 8, 1887 (Saturday)

The schooner Lizzie, Capt. Christian, arrived here from St, John's on Wednesday, with a full cargo of merchandise. She brought the following passengers: - Mrs. Jenkins, Mrs. Lawlor, Mrs. Hurdle, Mrs. Crocker, Misses Stuart, Christian, Messrs. R.S. Bremner, Geo. Hart, D.C. Webber, Masters Murphy, Jenkins.


Colonist

November 16, 1887 (Wednesday)

About 35 Newfoundland fishermen were lost on the banks this summer. There were about 2,000 men on the banks. This would give one in every 58. This points out the great risk attending the bank fishery.


Colonist

December 6, 1887 (Tuesday)

Terrible Accident on Railway Track. A Man and Woman Lose Their Lives. A sad accident occurred on the railway track yesterday afternoon, by which a man and a woman lost their lives. The following facts of the case were ascertained from Captain Nobel, at the Fort William Depot this morning: "Yesterday was apy day for the section hands on the road, and a special train was sent out with the paymaster. The train went right through to Harbour Grace, and was returning when the accident occurred. The hour was 3.25 p.m., and the place was near Cat Hills - about three miles from Brigus Junction.

When rounding a curve, on an up-grade, the train conductor saw a trolly approaching, with five persons on board. The brakes were applied to the train as quickly as possible; and it slowed up considerably; but the trolly could not be stopped, coming down the grade, and dashed into the train with frightful force. Previous to the collision three persons on the trolly jumped off, but the remaining two were so paralyzed by fear that they could not summon courage enough to jump. When the collision occurred the trolly was smashed to atoms, and the two unfortunate persons on board were thrown high into the air. They struck on their heads some distance away. The fall caused concussion of the brain, from which they have both since died. One was a man, the other a woman. The former was William Kennedy, of Salmon Cove; the latter, Mary Conners [sic], of Conception Harbour.

The train was stopped and both taken on board, to be brought to the hospital. Poor Kennedy died before reaching St. John's, but the woman lived until this morning, when she died in the hospital. Both were unmarried, and were under twenty years of age. The other three persons who jumped the trolly escaped with slight injury. The men were section hands, and, having overtaken Miss Connors [sic] on the road, were giving her a lift towards home. The trollys are being constantly used by the section hands, in moving from station to station. No blame attaches anywhere. Simply a special train was not expected at the hour, nothing more."


Harbour Grace Standard

March 3, 1888 (Saturday)

The Salmon Cove Casualty.
Last week when giving a few particulars of this melancholy affair, we remarked that a magisterial investigation was being held by Judge Prowse respecting it. We learn from the Colonist a few facts regarding the enquiry.

The Judge was accompanied by Inspector Fawcett and Dr. Rendell. The particulars are briefly these: "It seems that Patrick Walsh, (the man who lost his life), with two other men, Puddister and Terrence Morrissey (Mr. Fitzgibbon's clerk) left Cat Hill on Tuesday afternoon, to walk to Salmon Cove Junction. Morrissey felt very much fatigued and was very pleased to get to Edward Kennedy's house, Salmon Cove, where he obtained lodgings for the night. He treated Walsh and Puddister to a glass of rum. Walsh asked him for 2s. 6d., Morrissey would not give it to him for fear of his getting drunk, but he gave him five or six glasses in a black bottle, bought at Kennedy's. He noticed that Walsh had a black coat on when he came out with him. Morrissey left them in the shop, went in and had his tea, about 10.30 that evening. They came back to Kennedy's; Morrissey and Kennedy were sitting in the shop; he noticed that both had liquor taken, and Walsh had no black coat. Walsh called for a drink, Morrissey would not have one with them; Kennedy gave them the drink; don't know which of the men paid for the drink. Walsh put fifty cents on the counter and asked Kennedy for a bottle of rum; he refused at first, but ultimately gave Walsh the bottle; they said they were going to stop at Mahoney's. Kennedy said they could get the bottle of liquor in the morning. Walsh insisted on having the liquor and got it, put it in his pocket, and went out. Walsh told Morrissey he had borrowed 2/6d. from a friend, he had no black coat on then. According to Puddister's evidence he was a little in liquor when he left Kennedy's, but Walsh was very drunk.

I was delayed getting him along the road - we had a drink again at Mahoney's and also went to Ned Mahoney's and had a drink out of Walsh's bottle - mile and a half inside of Salmon Cove, had a drink again out of Walsh's bottle, we went along two miles further. I wanted Walsh to go into John Turner's; he would not, and we went on again. It was raining hard and blowing. Puddister says, he felt himself getting weak, left Walsh, and tried to get home to send help to him, and he was from midnight until daylight on the road, it began to freeze, and our wet clothes began to freeze on us; I laid down by the side of the track several times, I was unconscious at the last and don't know who brought me home, I feel very sick now."

Poor Patrick Walsh leaves a wife and six helpless children very badly off; he was a most industrious working man. He had been sick about a fortnight before the sad affair happened. Puddister, the companion of the unfortunate man Walsh, is recovering.


Harbour Grace Standard

August 15, 1888 (Wednesday)

The Black Game introduced by Mr. R.L. Mare have been again heard from, and the indications are that they are now firmly "rooted in the soil", having passed two winters in the country successfully with their numbers, to all intents, on the increase. This time a young brood has been seen in Salmonier, a short distance west of Judge Pinsent's country place. - Telegram.


Harbour Grace Standard

October 24, 1888 (Wednesday)

A fire occurred at Holyrood late last week, by which a barn belonging to Mr. John McGrath containing about seven tons of hay was completely destroyed. How it originated is not exactly known, but it is stated that a spark from the chimney of the dwelling must have blown through the door by the storm prevailing at the time. There was no insurance on the property.


Harbour Grace Standard

November 28, 1888 (Wednesday)

The Trinity Record of Saturday reports that a guillemot was shot by a man named Bailey in the North West Arm one day this week. This bird is not common about these parts, and therefore it was an object of curiosity and interest. The feathers are closely set, the beak long and sharp, and it has three completely webbed toes. But the chief characteristic appeared to be the position of its legs which are set far back, and, in this as in other respects, it resembles the penguin, to which it is allied. Mr. George Christian, who purchased the bird, has sent it to Mr. Howley, Superintendent of the Museum, and we have no doubt it will find a place in that useful and very interesting repository.


Harbour Grace Standard

December 5, 1888 (Wednesday)

It seems that the bird lately shot in the North West Arm of Trinity Bay was not, as was first supposed, a guillemot, but a true grebes [sic]. This, Mr. James P. Howley, of the Museum, St. John's, says is not a rare bird by any means, but has been hitherto unheard of in this country.


Royal Gazette

October 29, 1889 (Tuesday)

Published by Authority.
His Excellency the Governor, in Council, has been pleased to appoint Wm. Christian, Esq., J.P., (Old Perlican), to be Returning Officer for the District of Bay-de-Verde; and Edward Kennedy, Esq., (Salmon Cove), to be Returning Officer for the District of Harbor Main.
Secretary's Office, 29th October, 1889.


Weekly Record, Trinity

November 30, 1889 (Saturday)

Newfoundland Fishermen Drowned.

We note from the Cape Ann Advertiser that during the past year 14 Gloucester fishing vessels were lost. ... Of the 70 lives lost, 11 belonged to Newfoundland as follows:

From the schr. Carleton, which sailed for Georges, November 12th, and was never afterwards heard from; William Bird, of Fortune Bay, Nfld.; Michael Hines, Carbonear, Nfld.

From the schr. Joseph O., which sailed for Gloucester same day, and was probably lost in the same gale, viz.: November 25th: Ambrose Wise, St. John's, Nfld.; Bernard Tobin, St. John's, Nfld; Richard Sedward, Placentia Bay, Nfld.; Michael Kevany, Peter Hanson, Joseph Maliss, of St. John's, Nfld.

Andrew Munro, of Whitehead, N.S. and John Buffett of Port-au-Basque, Nfld, two of the crew of the schooner John G. Whittier, were drowned by the capsizing of their dory on Grand Bank, January 17th.

Michael Malone, a native of St. John's, Nfld., 52 years of age was lost overboard from schooner Oliver Eldridge while outward bound for Georges.

John Fagan, of St. Mary's Bay, Nfld. and Thomas Thompson, of Sable River, N.S., went astray from schooner Ben Hur on Grand Bank in June.


Harbour Grace Standard

September 9, 1890 (Tuesday)

Loss of a Schooner.
The Trinity Record says that the schr. Lily, Henry George [Batstone?] master, of English Harbor, was lost a short time ago, while endeavoring to make Dumpling Harbor, Labrador. The vessel was on her way home at the time, and had 800 qtls. of fish on board, 400 qtls. of which were recovered, and sold for the benefit of whom it may concern.


Evening Telegram

August 28, 1890 (Thursday)

Wanted, the descendants of William Mew Jennings or James Madgwick, planter, of Bonavista, to whom the former was apprenticed in 1771. W.M.J. last heard from in Pennsylvania. Please communicate with Miss Ashton, Northern District, Post office, London, England.


Evening Telegram

August 28, 1890 (Thursday)

Local Varieties.
Our columns to-day contain an advertisement from Elizabeth Ashton, of the Northern District Office, London, N., England, requesting information respecting the whereabouts of the descendants of William Mew Jennings. Married at the usual period of life, his eldest child, if living, would be about ninety years of age, and his eldest grandchild would be in mature life. These facts may help out those living in Bonavista, Catalina or Trinity to communicate what they may know of such a family either to this office or to the lady in question. The records of the Church of England in Bonavista might also throw some light on the subject.

 

 

Page Contributed by Tom Hynes

Page Revised by Ivy F. Benoit (Wednesday February 20, 2013)

Newfoundland's Grand Banks is a non-profit endeavor.
No part of this project may be reproduced in any form
for any purpose other than personal use.

JavaScript DHTML Menu Powered by Milonic

© Newfoundland's Grand Banks (1999-2016)

Hosted by
Chebucto Community Net

Your Community, Online!

NOTE:
You can search the entire NGB site
by using the [Google] search below.

Search through the whole site
[Recent] [Contacts] [Home]