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Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe
that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these
Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood
and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr.
Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood,
as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's,
although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match
for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The
people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish
till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

 

 

COMMUNITY OF UPPER GULLIES
(INCLUDES LOWER GULLIES (NOW RIVERDALE) AND HOPEWELL):

(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

 

 

ANDREWS , ANTHONY, BATTCOCK, BISHOP, BRIAN(D), COATES, COMERFORD, COUSENS, DAWE,, DWYER, ELLARD, FARRELL, HARTERY, HIBBS, HUSSEY, KEEFE, LEGGO, MOOR(E)(S), MORGAN, NUGENT, PICCO(TT), ROBERTS, SCOTT, WALL, WARFORD, WHELAN

 

 
 

 

ANDREWS:		a surname of England and Ireland - son of Andrew, 
			and as Andrew of Scotland, Andros or Andrews of Guersney
			(Channel Islands), from the baptismal name of Greek origin 
			meaning 'manly'.  It is also the anglicized form of the 
			Lebanese surname Andrea, and in Ireland  sometimes a 
			synonym of MacAndrew, Gaelic MacAindriu (Withycombe,
			Reaney, MacLysaght, Turk).   Guppy found Andrews widespread 
			in southern and western countries, especially Dorset, 
			Jampshire and Wiltshire, and  Andrew  especially in Cornwall 
			and Devon.  McLysaght found Andrews "fairly numerous in 
			Dublin and north-east Ulster, rare elsewhere".    Black 
			describes Andrew as "common in Scotland, both as a forename 
			and as a surname.  Its popularity, no doubt, is due to its 
			being the name of Scotland's patron saint."

In Newfoundland:	Garland Andrews, of Upper Gulley 
			(now Gullies),  1832  (DPHW 30)
			Garland Andrews, of Upper Gulley, 
			1835 (Voter's List)
			John Andrews, of Upper Gulley, 
			1835 (Voter's List)
			Alfred Andrews, of Upper Gulley, 
			1835 (Voter's List)
			Alfred Andrews, fisherman  of Upper Gulley, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			Hector Andrews, fisherman  of Upper Gulley, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			Henry Andrews, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			John Andrews, fisherman  of Upper Gulley, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			Henry of Jno Andrews, fisherman of Upper Gully, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)
			Charles Andrews, fisherman of Upper Gully, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)
			Wm. Andrews, Sr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)
			Wm. Andrews, Jr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)
			Alfred Andrews, fisherman of Upper Gully, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)
			Henry of Garland Andrews, fisherman of 
			Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)
			Henry of Henry Andrews, fisherman of 
			Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)
			Garland Andrews, fisherman of Upper Gully, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)

Modern Status:		Widespread

ANTHONY: a baptismal name and surname of England, Wales and Ireland, Ant (h) oine of France, Anthony and Ant (h) oine of the Channel Islands, from the Latin personal name Antonius, of unknown origin, the name of many saints. Withycombe comments on the spelling and pronuncation: "The intrusive h in the spelling Anthony was a later development, and seems not to appear before the late 16th century. It may have been the result of false etymologizing, for Camden (1605) derives the name from Greek anthos (flower). The h is, of course, silent, but there is some danger nowadays of a spelling pronuncation (already in use in USA), and the older spelling is to be preferred."(Reaney, Withycombe, Turk). Guppy found Anthony mostly in South Wales, and in smaller number in Norfolk, Derbyshire and Devon; McLysaght in Waterford since the 17th century. In Newfoundland: Job Anthony, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: small numbers in several communities in the Con. Bay and elsewhere.
BATTCOCK: a surname of England, a petform of Bartholomew. See BADCOCK, with which confusion is not unlikely. Traced by Reaney Notes in Devon as Batecock in 1339. In Newfoundland: Henry Badcock, fisherman, Upper Gully, (1894-97 Directory) Henry Badcock, farmer, Upper Gully, (1898 Directory) Henry Badcock, farmer, Upper Gullies, (1904 Directory) Modern Status: Battcock, rare; Badcock widespread
BISHOP: a surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the Old English personel name Bisc (e) op, or "a nickname of one which the appearance or bearing of a bishop, or a pageant name from the custom of electing a boy-bishop on St. Nicholas's Day" (Reaney), or one who worked in the household of a bishop; in Ireland, as a synonym by translation of MacAnespie and GILLESPIE. (MacLysaght, Black, Reaney, Cottle, Turk). Guppy and Matthews found the name widespread, especially in the southwest of England. In Newfoundland: George Bishop, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: widespread
BRIAN(D): (O) BRIEN, BRYAN (T), surnames, in one or more of the preceding variants, of England, Scotland, Ireland and France, from a Breton personal name containing the element bri - height, dignity, esteem (Dauzat, Black), or from a " Keltic (Old Welsh/Irish) name containing the element bre - hill" (Cottle), of simular form and significance. See also BRYNE.(MacLysaght, Reaney). As a baptismal name "Brian or Bryan has from early times been a favourite in Ireland on account of the national hero Brian Boroimhe; but it was, during the Middle Ages, equally popular in England...[when] for several centuries it was a favourite, as the many commom surnames derived from it testlfy....it survived in Yorks [hire] Westmoreland, Cheshire, Lanc [ashire] until the 18th century, but gradually fell into disuse and came to be regarded as as exclusively Irish name. It is still used in Brittany and has come back into use in England durin the present century" (Withycomb). As a family name in England, Reaney, who gives twelve variants, maintains that in the south it is a Breton personal name introduced by the Normans, and, according to Black, "by Bretons who among the Normans in the invasion of England", but in the north "it is O[ld] Ir [ish] Brian, bought by Norsemen from Iceland...to Cumberland and across the Pennines into Yorkshire." In Scotland, Black cites the forms Brian, Brien and Bryan, ans ascribes the Breton origin to them, as does Dauzat, Briant, Briend. In Ireland, MacLysaght sees the family O'Brien, O'Briain "deriving from the famiy of King Brian Boru", but notices that O'Brien may also be a synonym of O'Bryne (SEE BRYNE), of Bryan, and of MacBryan, Mac Braoin. Guppy traced Bryan widespread, especially in Leicestershire and Rutlandshire and Oxfordshire, Bryant especially in Somerset and Wiltshire. Spiegalehalter traced Brian, Bryan (t) in Devon. Matthews traced Brien, Bryan in Ireland, Devon and Dorset. Briant and Bryant in Devon. MacLysaght found O'Brien "now very numerous in other provinces as well as Munster, being the fifth most numerous name in Ireland", Bryan " The name of a prominent Anglo- Norman family settled in Co. Kilkenny", and MacBryan, sometimes changed to O'Brien in Cos. Fermanagh and Cavan. In Newfoundland: Bryen O'Brian of Lower Gully, 1835 (Voter's List) Bartholomew Brine, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: widespread, especially at Bell Island and Topsail
COATES: a surname of England and Scotland, in England from the English place name Cote (s), Coat(e) (s) in 13 countries including Coat (Somerset), from Old English cot(e) - cottage, shelter, woodsman's hut. "In Middle English, when the term was common, the surname may denote a dweller at the cottage (s) or, as it was used especially of a sheep-cote, one employed in the care of animals, a shepherd" (Reaney). In Scotland, Coates is a variant of Coults, from the Scots place name Cults (Aberdeenshire). (Reaney), Cottle, Black. Guppy traced Coate in Somerset and found Coates widespread especially in Yorkshire. In Newfoundland: Charles Coote of Upper Gulley, 1835 (Voter's List) Charles Coates, school teacher (Upper Gullies) of Chapels Cove, , (1864-65 Hutchinsons Directory) Charles Coate (and others), of Upper Gulley (now Gullies), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Cawte, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Cawte, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Levi Cawte, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Cawte, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Cawte, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Coste, school teacher of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Coate, jun., fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Coate, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Coats, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Coats, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Job Coats Jr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Nathaniel Coats, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Job Coats Sr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) David Coats, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
COMERFORD: a surname of England and Ireland, ? from the English place names Comberford (Straffordshire) or Comford (Cornwall), or for the Irish surname Cumiskey, or a variant of the English surname Comfort. (Ekwall, MacLysaght, E.C. Smith). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Kilkenny, Cavan and Longford, "prominent in Ireland since 1210" (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: John Coterford, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Rare.
COUSENS: COUSINS, surnames of England, Cousins of Ireland, from Old French cosin, cusin - in Middle English kinsman, kinwoman, cousin; or a variant of the English and Irish surname Cussen; or from Old French cocine, cuisine - (worker in the) kitchen. (Spiegelhalter, Reaney). See also CUZA. Traced, in several variants by Guppy in Berkshire, Dorset, Essex, Hampshire, Somerset and Yorkshire and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: James Cozens of Lower Gully, 1835 (Voter's List) Lary Cozens, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Cousens, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Lawrence Cousens, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Cousens, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Cousens, at Makinsons and St. John's; Cousins, scattered.
DAWE: a surname of England, either a diminutive of the baptismal name David (See Davey), or from Old English *dawe, Middle English dawe - jackdaw, ? a nickname for a petty thief, (Reaney, Cottle). Traced by Guppy in Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. In Newfoundland: John Daw, of Lower Gulley (now Riverdale), 1832 (DPHW 30) John Daw of Lower Gulley, 1835 (Voter's List) Charles Daw of Lower Gulley, 1835 (Voter's List) Issac Daw & Sons, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Samuel Daw, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Daw, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Abram of Charles Daw, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Abram of John Daw, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Silas Daw, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Dawe, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-87 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram of John Dawe, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Dawe, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Benjamin Dawe, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Dawe, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James of John Dawe, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram Dawe Sr., fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram Dawe Jr., fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Philip Dawe, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread
DWYER: (O)Dwyer surnames of Ireland. ODuibhir, Ir. dubh and odhar (genitive uidhir) - dark or duncoloured. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Tipperary. In Newfoundland: John Dwyer, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Dwyer, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Dwyer, widespread, O'Dwyer, rare
ELLARD: a surname of England and Ireland, in England from the Old English personal name Ethelheard - noble - hard, or from an Old German name Adelard or Agilard; in Ireland a variant of AYLWARD mainly in Cos. Cork and Wexford. (Reaney, MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Michael Ellard of Lower Gully, 1835 (Voter's List) Michael Ellard, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Ellerd, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Ellerd, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Rare.
FARRELL: a surname of England and Ireland; in England a variant of FAR(E)WELL; in Ireland (O) FARRELL, FERRALL, Ofearghail - Man of valour. (Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Farrall in Staffordshire, Spiegelhalter traced Farrall in Devon, and MacLysaght found (O) Farrell, Ferrall widespread. In Newfoundland: Nicholas Farrell of Lower Gully, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: widespread
HARTERY: a variant of the surname of Ireland, (O) Hartry, O hAirtri. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght originally in Connacht, now in Cos, Waterford and south Tipperary. In Newfoundland: James Hartery, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Michael Hartery, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered.
HIBBS: a surname of England from a petform of the baptismal names Isabel (Elizabeth) from the Hebrew - my God (is) satisfaction, or Ilbert from the Old German personal name Hildeberht containing the elements strife and bright. (Withcombe, Reaney). In Newfoundland: Thomas Hibbs, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Hibbs, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
HUSSEY: a surname of England, Ireland and ? Wales, in England from Old French hosed (house) - truck-hosed, booted, or Middle English hus(e) wyf - housewife, mistress of a family, or from the French place and family name Houssay; in Ireland (O) Hussey, O hEodhusa,or a variant of de Hosey. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Somerset and Wiltshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, andby MacLysaght from de Hosey in Cos. Kerry and Meath, and from O'Hussey in Cos. Fermanagh and Tyrone. In Newfoudland: Thomas Hussey, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread
KEEFE: (O)KEEFE variants of the surname of Ireland, (O) Keefe, O Caoimh, Ir. caomh - gentle. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in south Munster, In Newfoundland: O'Keefe (about 1827-1902), born at Upper Gullies (MUN Folklore. Modern status: scattered. O'Keefe, widespread
LEGGO: ? a variant of the surname of France Ligot, French lien - tie, bond, a nickname for a binder of sheaves etc., (Dauzat). In Newfoundland: Henry Leggo, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: At Corner Brook
MOOR(E)(S): surnames of England MUIR, Mure, Mo(o)r(e), of Scotland, Moore of Ireland, from a personal name More, Old French Maur, Latin Maurus - a Moor or dark as a Moor, swarthy, the name of a 6th centry saint, or from the English place names Moor(e) (Devon), Moore (Cheshire), More (Shropshire), or from Old English mor - (dweller on or near the) moor, march, fen, waste land; in Ireland also for (O) More, O Mordha, Ir. mordha - majestic. (Reaney, Black, MacLysaght, Spiegelhalter). See also MUIR. Guppy found Moore widespread in England and Muir in Ayrshire and Dumfriesshire. MacLysaght found Moore widespread in Ireland but numerous only in Co. Antrim and Dublin. In Newfoundland: James Moores, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Moore, widespread, especially at Avondale. Moores, widespread. Moors, in the Twillingate district (Electors 1955)
MORGAN: a surname of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, and a baptismal name in Wales, from an Old Celtic name Morcant, Morgan containing the elements sea and ? bright; in Ireland also the anglicized form of several Irish surnames. See MERRIGAN. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black, Withycombe). Traced by Guppy especially in Monmouthshire ans South and North Wales, by Black in Aberdeenshire, and by MacLysaght in Cos. Armagh, Monaghan, Belfast and Dublin and eslewhere. In Newfoundland: Johathan Morgan, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Morgan, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Morgan, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Morgan, Sr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Morgan, Jr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram Morgan, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Morgan, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread, especially at Indian Pond ,Seal Cove, Upper Gullies.
NUGENT: a surname of Ireland, Nuiseann,from the Norman surname de Nogent. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Cork and Westmeath. In Newfoundland: William Nugent of Lower Gully, 1835 (Voter's List) Michael Nugent of Lower Hully, 1835 (Voter's List) John Nugent of Lower Gully, 1835 (Voter's List) John Nugent, boarding house of Lower Gullies, 1864-65 (Hutchinsons Directory) Edward Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Nugent, of John, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Nugent, farmer of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Nugent, of Michael, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Michael Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward E. Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Nugent, Sr., fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Nugent, Jr., fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Stephen Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Michael Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Patrick Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Nugent, Sr., fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Nugent, Jr., fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Nugent, Sr., fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Nugent, Jr., fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Nugent, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Riverdale and Kelligrews.
PICCO(TT): variants of Picot, a surname of England and the Channel Islands? From Old French personal name PIC with the Suffix -OT or ? from a nickname from Old French PICOT - point, pointed object, Picaud, a pejorative form of Piqueur - user of a pickaxe. (Reaney, Dauzat, Turk). See also PICKETT. In Newfoundland: William James Picco, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Picco - scattered; Piccott - scattered
ROBERTS: a surname of England, Wales and Ireland from the baptismal name Robert, from the Old German personal name Hrodebert, Old English Hreodbeorht, Old French Ro(d)bert, containing the elements fame and bright. Robert, introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest, and its pet-forms and diminutives Rob(in), Hob, Dob, Nob and later Bob, have been the source of many surnames including ROBERTS(ON),ROBBINS ROB(IN)SON, HOBBS, BOBBETT,PROBERT, HOPKINS, DOBBIN, DOBSON, RABBIT(T)S and ? DIBBON. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle). See also ROPSON. Found widespread by Guppy in the south and Midlands and especially in North Wales; and by MacLysaght in all provinces though rare in Connacht. In Newfoundland: Elijah Roberts, fisherman of Upper Gulley 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Elijah Roberts, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread.
SCOTT: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland; in Scotland from Old English Scott - an Irishman, later a Geal from Scotland, a name of mysterious origin ? associated with Welsh ysgwthr - cutting, carving, hence the tattooed people; in England - a man from Scotland not necessarily a Geal, and also a personal name; also ? confused with Scutt, ? From Old French escoute, Middle English scut - scout, spy, (Reaney, Cottle, Black). Traced by Guppy especially in the Border counties of England and Scotland, in eastern England, Devon, and (as Scutt) in Dorset, and by MacLysaght in Ulster and Dubin. In Newfoundland: Charles Scott, planter of Upper Gullies, 1832 (DPHW 34). Charles Scott of Upper Gulley, 1835 (Voters List) William Scott of Upper Gulley, 1835 (Voters List) Benjamin Scott, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Scott, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Levi Scott, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Scott, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Scott, Sr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Scott, Jr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Scott, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Wm. John Scott, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Henry Scott, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Scott, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread, especially in St. John's and Upper Gullies.
WALL: a surname of England and Ireland, in England and Old English weall- (dwelller by the town, sea, or ruined Roman) wall or in the West Midlands dialect area where walle is for welle-(dweller by the)spring or stream; in Ireland for the Norman surname de Valle gaelicized as de Bhal. (Reaney , Cottle, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Derbyshire, Durham, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Somerset and Worcestershire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in Limerick and Connacht. In Newfoundland: Patrick Wall, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: Widespread
WARFORD: a surname of England from the English place name Warford (Cheshire) or (dweller by the) ford (by the) wier. See WARE, WIER. In Newfoundland: Isaac Warford,fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Warford, fisherman of Upper Gulley, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Isaac Warsord, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Warford, Sr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Warford, Jr., fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram Warfard, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Warford, fisherman of Upper Gully, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Upper Gullies, (Conception B.)
WHELAN: a surname of Ireland, with a variant WHALEN, (O) Whelan, Ó Faoldin, Ir. faol - wolf, a variant of PHELAN, or sometimes an abbreviation of Whelehan, or occasionally a synonym of Hyland. Whalen is recorded by E.C. Smith but not by MacLysaght. MacLysaght found Whelan numerous in the country between Cos. Wexford, Tipperary and Wexford, and rare in Ulster. In Newfoundland: Thomas Whelan, fisherman of Lower Gully, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Whalen, widespread, especially at St. John's, Whelan, widespread, especially at St. John's, Colliers and Bauline.

 

 

TRANSCRIBED AND PROVIDED BY: Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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