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As always, confirm these, as you would any other source material.

 

 

Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe
that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these
Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood
and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr.
Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood,
as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's,
although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match
for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The
people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

 

 

COMMUNITY OF TOPSAIL
(Topsail Road and Topsail Proper):

(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

 

 

ALLAN , BARNES, BEARN(E)S, BOGGAN, BRIAN(D), BURNS, BUTLER, CARTER, CHRISTOPHER, CHURCHILL, COLLEY, CONNOLLY, CONWAY, DAL(E)Y, DAWE, DENIEF, DONOVAN, DROWN(S), DRUKEN, DUFF, DUNN, FARRELL, FLANNERY, GEEHAN, GLADNEY, GLEASON, GRANGER, HARDING, HIBBS, HOLLEY, HUTCHINSON, KANE, KENNEDY, KING, LONG, M(A)CDONALD, M(A)CDOUGAL(L), MAYO, MEANEY, MERCER, METCALF(E), MILLER, MOLLOY, MOYSE, NASH, NEVILLE, PALAIRET, PARMENTER, POWER, REAY, REES(E), ROACH(E), RYAN, SCOTT, SMITH, SNOW, SOMMERS, SQUIRE(S), STYLES, SWANSBOROUGH, TURNER, WALSH, WAUGH, WOODFORD,

 

 
 

 

ALLAN:			ALLEN,baptismal names and surnames of England, Ireland 
			and Scotland,  Allen of the Channel Islands, of various origins.In 
			England, and sometimes in Scotland and Ireland, they derive from 
			Old French Alain, Alein, Old Breton Alan,  "the names of a Welsh 
			and Breton saint, which was popular with the Bretons who came over 
			with the conqueror, particularly in Lincolnshire"  (Reaney).  "But 
			early Breton stem Alamn - suggests an origin in Germanic tribal 
			[name] Alemann - All men, as in French name for Germany"  (Cottle).   
			In Scotland it may also derive from the Old Gaelic name Ailene  or  
			Ailin  from  ail-rock.   In Ireland it may derive from both the 
			foregoing , or from  O hAillin in Cos. Offaly and Tipperary, or it 
			may be a synonym of Hallinan in Tipperary.  (Withycombe,  Reaney,  
			Cottle,  Black,  MacLysaght, Turk).   Guppy found Allan in 
			Northumberland and Southern Scotland,   Allen widespread in 
			England, with a further variant Allin, in Devon and Oxfordshire.   
			Matthews found Allen widespread in Devon , Dorset and Somerset.

In Newfoundland:	Family tradition - Four Allen brothers from Portugal Cove 
			lived at Topsail in 1822 (MUN Hist.)
			James Allen of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List)
			George Allen of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List)
			James Allen, jun, carpenter of Topsail, 
			1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory)
			James Allen, sen, carpenter of Topsail, 
			1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory)
			William Allen, carpenter of Topsail, 
			1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory)
			Edward Allen, fisherman of Topsail, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			George Allen, fisherman of Topsail, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			James Allen, jun., carpenter of Topsail, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			William Allen, of Topsail, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			Edward Allen, fisherman of Topsail, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
			Thomas Allen, fisherman of Topsail, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
			William Allen, fisherman of Topsail, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
			James Allen, fisherman of Topsail, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
			James R. Allen, fisherman of Topsail, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
			Frederick Allen, fisherman of Topsail, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
			Mrs. Allen, hotel & general dealer of Topsail, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

Modern Status:		Widespread

BARNES: a surname of England, Ireland and Scotland; in England from residence near or work at the barn [s], or from the English place name Barnes (Surry), or son of Barnes; in Ireland as a synonym of BARRON and of (O) Bardon in Co. Wexford; In Scotland from the Scots place name Barnes (Aberdeenshire). See also BEARN[E] S. (Reaney,Cottle, Black, MacLysaght). Guppy found the name widespread especially in Wiltshire, Hampshire, Dorset, Cumberland and Westmorland; Spiegelhalter and Matthews in Devon; MacLysaght "in small numbers in all provinces." In Newfoundland: John Barnes, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Barnes, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Albert Barnes, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Barnes, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Barnes, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Wm. J. Barnes, hotel of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: scattered
BEARN(E)S: variants of the surname of England BARNES. In Newfoundland: William Bearns, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: rare at St. John's
BOGGAN: a surname of Ireland, (O) Bog (g) an, O'Bogain, Ir. bog - soft. (MacLysaght). Mainly associated with Cos. D onegal and Wexford (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Michael Boggin of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) John Boggin, farmer, of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Boggin, farmer, of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Boggan, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: rare at Topsail
BRIAN(D): (O) BRIEN, BRYAN (T), surnames, in one or more of the preceding variants, of England, Scotland, Ireland and France, from a Breton personal name containing the element bri - height, dignity, esteem (Dauzat, Black), or from a " Keltic (Old Welsh/Irish) name containing the element bre - hill" (Cottle), of simular form and significance. See also BRYNE. (MacLysaght, Reaney). As a baptismal name "Brian or Bryan has from early times been a favourite in Ireland on account of the national hero Brian Boroimhe; but it was, during the Middle Ages, equally popular in England...[when] for several centuries it was a favourite, as the many commom surnames derived from it testlfy....it survived in Yorks [hire] Westmoreland, Cheshire, Lanc [ashire] until the 18th century, but gradually fell into disuse and came to be regarded asas exclusively Irish name. It is still used in Brittany and has come back into use in England durin the present century" (Withycomb). As a family name in England, Reaney, who gives twelve variants, maintains that in the south it is a Breton personal name introduced by the Normans, and, according to Black, "by Bretons who among the Normans in the invasion of England", but in the north "it is O[ld] Ir [ish] Brian, bought by Norsemen from Iceland...to Cumberland and across the Pennines into Yorkshire." In Scotland, Black cites the forms Brian, Brien and Bryan, ans ascribes the Breton origin to them, as does Dauzat, Briant, Briend. In Ireland, MacLysaght sees the family O'Brien, O'Briain "deriving from the famiy of King Brian Boru", but notices that O'Brien may also be a synonym of O'Bryne (SEE BRYNE), of Bryan, and of MacBryan, Mac Braoin. Guppy traced Bryan widespread, especially in Leicestershire and Rutlandshire and Oxfordshire, Bryant especially in Somerset and Wiltshire. Spiegalehalter traced Brian, Bryan (t) in Devon. Matthews traced Brien, Bryan in Ireland, Devon and Dorset. Briant and Bryant in Devon. MacLysaght found O'Brien "now very numerous in other provinces as well as Munster, being the fifth most numerous name in Ireland", Bryan " The name of a prominent Anglo-Norman family settled in Co. Kilkenny", and MacBryan, sometimes changed to O'Brien in Cos. Fermanagh and Cavan. In Newfoundland: Family tradition - John O'Brien (1803-1875) from Co. Wexford, settled at Topsail in 1833 (MUN Georg) William Brine of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) James Brine, of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Brine, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Brien, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Edward Brien, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Brien, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Richard Brien, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Brien, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: O'Brien - widespread especially at Bell Island and Topsail
BURNS: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland, ? from a nickname - burn house, or (dweller by the) burn (s) - stream (s),or from the Scots place name Burnhouse. " The forefathers of Robert Burns migrated from Burnhouse in Taynuilt to Forfarshire (now Angus) where they were called Campbells of Burnhouse, and later Burness or Burns... The stress Burness was on the first syllable and as the name was pronounced in Ayrshire as if written Burns, Robert and his brother agreed to drop Burness and to assume Burns in April 1786 (Reaney after Black). In Ireland, Burns is widely used for O'Beirne, Bittane and BYRNE, and is also the modern form of Mac Conboirne. (MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Cumberland and Westmoreland and in the Glasgow district and Perthshire; by MacLysaght in Ulster and to a lesser extent in Munster. See also BYRNE (S). In Newfoundland: Thomas Burn, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Burn, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: scattered
BUTLER: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French bouteillier - servant in charge of the wine-cellar, usually the head servant. "In some early examples, an officer of high rank nominally connected with the supply and importation of wine". (Reany). Later examples may be for Bottler - maker of (leather) bottles. Guppy found Butler widespread. Spiegelhalter traced it in Devon. MacLysaght found it widespread in all provinces except Ulster. Black comments that Butler appears to have been ousted in Scotland by SPENCE. In Newfoundland: John J. Butler, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Jabez Butler, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: widespread
CARTER: a surname of England, Ireland, Scotland and Guernsey (Channel Islands), maker orDriver of carts; in Ireland "sometimes used for MacArthur." (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght Turk). Widespread in England, including Devon, and Ireland (Guppy, MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Rev. G.W.B. Carter, C of E., of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Carter, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: Widespread
CHRISTOPHER: a baptismal name and surname of England and Ireland, Latin Chistopherus from Greek - Christ - bearing, "origenally a word applied by Christians to themselves, meaning that they bore Christ in their hearts. St Christopher was an early Christian martyr, to whose name was later attached the legend of a gigantic saint who carried the Christ-child across a river, and Christopher became an ordinary Christopher name. The sight of the image of St. Christopher was thought to be a protection from accidents and sudden death for the rest of the day" (Withycombe). (Reaney). Spiegelhalter traced Christopher (s) in Hampshire; MacLysaght traced Christopher in Co Waterford. In Newfoundland: Bridget Christopher, school teacher of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
CHURCHILL: a surname of England, from the England place name Churchill (Devon), Somerset, Worcestershire, Warwickshire), or (dweller on the) Church-hill. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Dorset and Middlesex, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: Philip (1775-1850), Whose ancestors came from Belfast, was born at Portugal Cove and was the first settler of Topsail in 1813 (MUN Geog.) Samuel Churchill of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Philip Churchill of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Samuel Churchill, carpenter of Topsail, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Philip Churchill of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Samuel Churchill, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Churchill, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
COLLEY: a surname of England, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from Old English coliz coaly, coal-black, hence? Swarthy or ? black-Haired, or from the English place name Colley House (Devon), or a variant of Coley, Cowley, or also, in Ireland for MacColley, Mac Colla, or a variant of Cooley. (Reaney, MacLysaght, Turk). Traced by Guppy in North Wales, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in Cos. Roscommom and Galway. In Newfoundland: Rev. Edward Colley, Episcopal Minister of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dirrectory) Modern status: Rare at Channel
CONNOLLY: a surname of Ireland, O Conghaile (Connacht, Monaghan) , O Coingheallaigh (Munster). Connelly is the spelling in Co. Galway. (MacLysaght). MacLysaght found Connolly widespread. In Newfoundland: Thomas Connelly, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
CONWAY: a surname of England and Ireland; in England from the Welsh place name Conway, "one of the few Welsh towns that have Originated a surname". (Barsley); In Ireland, the anglicized form of several Gaelic surnames, Mac Connmhaigh, Ir. Condmach Head smashing, Mac Conmidhe - hound of Meath, O' Conbhiudhe, Ir. Con - hound and buidhe - yellow, and O' Connmhachain (Bardsley, Cottle, MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Clare, Tyrone, Sligo and Mayo. In Newfoundland: John Conway, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: widespread, especially at Colliers, St. John's and St. Bride's
DAL(E)Y: surnames of England and Ireland, in England a variant of Dalley, in Ireland, (O)O Daly, O Dalaigh, Ir, dalach, from dail - assembly, or a variant of (O) Dealey or ? (O) Deeley. (MacLysaght). Daly was traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon; (O) Daly, Dawley by MacLysaght originally in Co. Westmeath but later in Cos. Clare, Cork and Galway; and Dailey, Dealley in Devon and Enniscorthy (Co. Wexford) by Matthews. In Newfoundland: Patrick Daly, of Topsail, 1855 (Newfoundlander 29 Nov 1855. Patrick Daley, general dealer of Topsail, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Patrick Daly, general dealer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
DAWE: a surname of England, either a diminutive of the baptismal name David (See Davey), or from Old English *dawe, Middle English dawe - jackdaw, ? a nickname for a petty thief, (Reaney, Cottle). Traced by Guppy in Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. In Newfoundland: John Dawe, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
DENIEF: a variant of the surname of Ireland Denieffe. A rare Co. Kilkenny name sometimes abbreviated there to Neef. Reaney says it is Derived from an Old English personal name (MacLysaght), Denegifu (feminine), unrecorded, but found in { the English place Name} Dennington (Suffolk). (Reaney Origin, 115). (MacLysaght, Reaney Origin, Ekwall). In Newfoundland: George Denief, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Denief, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: at St. John's
DONOVAN: a surname of Ireland (O)Donovan, O Donnabhain. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght originally in Co. Limerick, later in Cos, Cork and Kilkenny. In Newfoundland: Michael Donovan, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
DROWN(S): surnames of England, from Middle English droun - drone (a nickname). (Spiegelhalter). Spiegelhalter traced Drown (e) in Devon. In Newfoundland: Thomas Downs, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Drowns, rare at Bell Island.
DRUKEN: a variant of the surnames of Ireland (O) Droogan, Drugan, ODruagain, (MacLysaght). " An ancient Co. Armagh Family… It is found as far west as Co. Leitrim but is nowhere numerous. "(MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Thomas Druken, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Druken, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: especially at St Thomas.
DUFF: a surname of Scotland and Ireland, Gaelic - Ir. dubh - black; and also in Ireland as a shortened form of Duffin in Co. Wexford, MacElduff in Co. Tyrone, and of DUFFY in several counties.(Black, MacLysaght).Guppy found Duff widespread in Scotland, especially in Perthshire. In Newfoundland: Peter Duff, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Especially at St John's and District.
DUNN: a surname of England, Ireland and Scotland; in England from an Old English personal name Dun, Old English dunn - dull brown, dark, swarthy; in Ireland (O) Dunne,O Duinn or O Doinn,Ir. donn - brown, "usually spelt with the final e"; in Scotland originally from Celtic donn - brown or from a Scots place name ? Dun (Angus). (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black). Guppy traced Dunn in ten countries, including especially Yorkshire, Durham, Northumberland, Warwickshire, Devon and Dorset and found it widespread south of the forth and Clyde. MacLysaght found (O)Dunn(e) "one of the most numerous name in the Middle countries." In Newfoundland: Edward Dunn, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Dunn, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Dunn, scattered; Dunne scattered, especially at St John's
FARRELL: a surname of England and Ireland; in England a variant of FAR(E)WELL; in Ireland (O) FARRELL, FERRALL, Ofearghail - Man of valour. (Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Farrall in Staffordshire, Spiegelhalter traced Farrall in Devon, and MacLysaght found (O) Farrell, Ferrall widespread. In Newfoundland: Michael Farrell, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: widespread
FLANNERY: This surname does not show in E.R. Seary's unless it's a variant of the surname FENNELLY, however, it has been around For a while, The first record I could find was a Bridget Flannery of St. John's, will probated c. 1820's (Vol 1 - Page 23) They also show Flannery in St. John's from 1871 to 1904 and Topsail as well. A Timothy Flannery show up as a servant Of Fermeuse to a Wm. Knox, Esq., (date unknow) and on the 1921 Census showing a Annie Flannery b.1929 at St. John's And is listed as 92 and the MIL to James J. Farrell. NOTE: IF ANYONE HAS FURTHER INFORMATION ON THIS SURNAME OR THE VARIANT OF IT, WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. In Newfoundland: Thomas Flannery, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Matthew Flannery, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Flannery, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Edward Flannery, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Flannery, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: UNKNOWN
GEEHAN: a surname of Ireland, (O) Geehan, a variant of the Co. Wicklow name (O)Gahan, O Gaoithin, Ir. gaoth - wind. (MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced (O) Gahan in Cos. Wexford and Wicklow. In Newfoundland: Family tradition: -----, from Harbour Grace settled at Topsail, about 1822 (MUN Hist). John Geehan, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Richard Geehan, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Martin Geehan, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Geehan, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Geehan, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Richard Geehan, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: At Topsail.
GLADNEY: a surname of England and ? Scotland, ? from the Scots place name Gla(i)dney (Fifeshire) or ? (dweller by or in the ) small, enclosed or fenced yard. (E.C. Smith). See also CLATNEY. In Newfoundland: Family traditions: -----, from England to Waterford; his brother -----, settled at Topsail and subsequently at Portugal Cove Road (St. John's) (MUN Folklore). Modern status: scattered
GLEASON: a variant of the surnames of Ireland, (O) GLEESON , O Glasain or O Gliasain. (MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced (O) Gleeson in Co. Tipperary. In Newfoundland: Timothy Gleeson, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Samuel Gleeson, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Gleeson, at Topsail.
GRANGER: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French grangier - one in charge of, or who works at, a grange, granary, barn, a farm Balliff. (Reaney, Cottle). Guppy traced Grainger in Yorkshire NR and ER, Granger in Worchestershire; Spiegelhalter traced Gra(i)nger "quite numberous in Co. Antrim….but….not confined to Ulster." In Newfoundland: Daniel Grangel, Sr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Daniel Grangel, Jr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: rare at St. John's
HARDING: a surname of England and Ireland, from the Old English personal name Hearding - hard, brave, warrior, hero, or from the English place name Haredon (Devon). (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Found widespread by Guppy, especially in Somerset and Wiltshire, and by MacLysaght in Co. Tipperary and adjoining counties in the 17th century, elsewhere as early as the 19th century. In Newfoundland: Esau Harding, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Harding, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
HIBBS: a surname of England from a petform of the baptismal names Isabel (Elizabeth) from the Hebrew - my God (is) satisfaction, or Ilbert from the Old German personal name Hildeberht containing the elements strife and bright. (Withcombe, Reaney). In Newfoundland: James Hibbs, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Alfred Hibbs, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) George Hibbs, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
HOLLEY: a surname of england, HOLLY of Ireland, from Old English hol and leah - (dweller by the) clearing in the hollow, or hol and edge - hollow-eye, a nickname; in Ireland for Mac Cuilinn by translation (CO. Kerry), and an accasional synonym of MacQuillian in Ulster. (Reaney, MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Edward Holly, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Holley, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
HUTCHINSON: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland, son of Huchun (See HUTCHENS, HUE), cognate with (Mac)Cutcheon, Ir. Mac Uistin, Scots Gaelic Mac Uisdin. (Reaney, MacLysaght, Black). Guppy traced Hutchinson in the Northern counties of England, Hutchison "over the north." Spiegelhalter traced Hutchi(n)son in Devon, and MaClYsaght Hutchinson in Ulster. In Newfoundland: Rev. George Hutchison M.A., C of E., of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Rare
KANE: a surname of England and Ireland, in England a variant of CAIN or CANE, in Ireland (O)Kane, O Cahan, O Cathain or a variant of (O)Keane, O Cein. (Reaney, MacLysaght). See also KEAN. Traced by MacLysaght in Ulster. In Newfoundland: Patrick Kane, fisherman of Topsail Road, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Kane, fisherman of Topsail Road, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Kane, fisherman of Topsail Road, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Kane, Sr., farmer of Topsail, 1904 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Kane, Jr., farmer of Topsail, 1904 (McAlpine's Directory) John Kane, farmer of Topsail, 1904 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
KENNEDY: a surname of Ireland and Scotland, (O)Kennedy, O Cinneide, Ir. ceann - head, eidigh - ugly, modern Gaelic Ceannaideach. "The Scottish Kennedys are by remote origin Irish Gaels." (MacLysaght, Black). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Tipperary and Wexford, and by Guppy especially in Ayrshire, Dumfrieshire, Invernesshire and Agryleshire. In Newfoundland: Patrick Kennedy of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Kennedy, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Kennedy, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Cornelius Kennedy, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
KING: a surname of England , Scotland and Ireland, from Old English Cyng, a nickname from cyn(in)g - king, or also from cyn(in)g - king, a nickname for one of kingly appearance or qualities, of for one who had acted the part of a king in a play or pageant or had been 'king' of some festivity, or had seen service in a royal household. In Ireland, King is usually an English name, but it is also widly used as an anglicized form of several names, including CONROY, by pseudo-translation. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy found King widespread in England, especially in Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Wiltshire, and Scoland, except the North. In Newfoundland: Thomas King, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Modern status: Widespread.
LONG: a surname of Endland, Scotland and Ireland,from Old English long, lang - long , tall, the sothern and Midlands form in contrast to LANG, LAING in the north and in Scotland, though Long is also recorded in Scotland; also in Ireland for a Norman name de Long , or O Longain or O Longaigh. Traced by Guppy in the south and Midlands, especially in Wiltshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght especiallt in Cos. Cork and Donegal. In Newfoundland: William Long, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
M(A)CDONALD: surnames of Scotland and Ireland and of the Micmacs of Newfoundland, Mac Dhomhnuill - son of Donald, from primitive Celtic *Dubno-walos containing the elements world and mighty, in Old Irish Domnall, in Gaelic Domhnall, Black comments: "Property speaking there is no such surname as Macdonald. MacDhomhnuill means 'son of (a particular) Donald': all other of the name are simply Domhnullach, 'one of the Donalds'."But, as Cottle remarks, "be that as it may, it was the second commonest surname (after SMITH) in Scotland in 1858, dropping to third (after SMITH and BROWN) by 1958… " In Ireland, sometimes a synonym of the Irish MacDONNELL. (Withycombe, Black, Cottle, MacLysaght). See O'DONALD. Traced by Guppy in Inverness-shire. In Newfoundland: Mary MacDonald ( -1880), from Catalina, married and settled at Topsail (MUN Geog.). Modern status: Widespread, especially at Colliers.
M(A)CDOUGAL(L): a surname of Scotland with several variants, MacDhughaill- son of Dougal, from "Old Irish dubhgall 'black stranger' a name originally given by the Irish to the Norwegians, which later became a common christian name. It is now chiefly used in the Highlands of Scotland. The word dubhgall is still used in Irish and Gaelic to indicate an Englishman and in Modern Breton for a Frenchman." (Withycombe). Traced by Guppy in Argyllishire. In Newfoundland: -------, farmer of Topsail, 1871 ( Lovell's Directory) Modern status: MacDougall, McDougal, McDougall, scattered.
MAYO: a surname of England and Ireland, in England from Old French Mahieu , a Norman form of Matthew (See MATTHEWS); in Ireland (Mac) Mayo, Mac Maighiu , from the same source. (Reaney, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Dorset and by MacLysaght in Co. Mayo, though the surname is not taken from the name of the country. In Newfoundland: William Mayo of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Thomas Mayo of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: scattered
MEANEY: a surname of Ireland (O) Meany, a Munster form of (O) MOONEY, O Maonaigh, Ir. moenach - dumb or Ir. maonach - wealthy. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Clare and Kilkenny. In Newfoundland: Patrick Meany, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory Modern status: Scattered, especially in Avondale.
MERCER: a surname of England and Ireland, Old French merc(h)ier - merchant, especially a dealer in silks, velvets and other costly f abrics. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Kent and Lancashire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Antrim and Down and as Mercier in Co. Offaly and other midland counties. In Newfoundland: George Mercer, fisherman of Topsail, 1840 (DPHW 39) John Mercer, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Stephen Mercer, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Mercer, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) George Mercer, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Mercer, Jr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Mercer, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
METCALF(E): surnames of England and Ireland , of uncertian origin, ? from Old English *mets-cealf - a calf fattened for food, hence a nickname for a fat man. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Cumberland, Westmorland, Durham, Lancashire and Yorkshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in Ireland since the 17th century. In Newfoundland: John Metcalfe, of Topsail, 1835 (DPHW 26D) James Metcalfe, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Nicholas Metcalfe, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Metcalfe, at Bell Island and Harbour Main District.
MILLER: a surname a England, Ireland and Scotland, from Middle English mylne - mill or Old Norse mylnari - miller. Miller is an assimilated formof Milner. Millar is a Scots form. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black). Guppy traced Miller in 14 counties in England, and Millar and Miller over the greater part of Scotland though rare in the North. MacLysaght found Millar and Miller very numerous in Co. Antrim and adjacent countries. In Newfoundland: Robert Miller, of Topsail Bite, 1830 (DPHW 30) Robert Miller of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Joseph Miller of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Robert Miller, boarding house, of Topsail, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) James Miller, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Miller, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Miller, Jr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Miller, Sr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Ananias Miller, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Nathaniel Miller, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Joseph Miller, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Miller, Jr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Miller, hotel of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
MOLLOY: a surname of Ireland, (O) Molloy, Mulloy, O Maolmhuaidh, Ir., muadh - big, soft, noble, or an anglicized form of O Maolaoidh (See MILLEY), or for a number of other Irish names (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Offaly and Roscommon and elsewhere. In Newfoundland: Edward Molloy, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: scattered
MOYSE: a surname of England and Jersey (Channel Islands). Hebrew Moses, French Moise, - of obscure origin, (Withycombe, Reaney,Turk). See also MOYST. Traced by Speigelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: James Moyes, blacksmith of Topsail, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) James Moyes, of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Moyse, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Moyse, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: scattered
NASH: a surname of England and Ireland - (dweller) at the ash tree. See ASH. Traced by Guppy in Buckinghamshire, Gloucestershire, Hertfordshire and Surrey, by Spegielhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in Cos. Limerick and Kerry. In Newfoundland: Robert Nash, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: scattered, especially at Branch
NEVILLE: a surname of England, Ireland and Jersey (Channel Islands), from the French place names Neville (Seine-Inferieure) or Neuville (Calvados and elsewhere); also in Ireland for Nee, O Niadh, Ir. niadh champion, and (Mac)Nevin, Mac Cnaimhin, ? Ir. cnamh - bone. (MacLysaght, Turk). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Limerick, Clare, Kilkenny and Waterford. In Newfoundland: James Nevill of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Gregory Neville, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Neville, farmer of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Gregory Neville, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Neville, Jr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Neville, Sr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Richard Neville, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
PALAIRET: Seary has made no mention of this name in the Names of the Island of Newfoundland, however, history for St. John the Evangelist - Church of England has recorded that the Topsail church became a separate Mission in 1860 and Rev. Charles Palairet was appointed its first incumbent. Rev. Mr. Palairet stemming from a rich background in France, and was very Active in the planning and purchasing of materials for the sturucture of the Church and Parsonage. Mr. Palairet continued His remarkable work acquiring many acres of land for the Church. He also built a Church and parsonage in Foxtrap, Bought small plots of land and built houses for the poor families, as well as lavish a small fortune on the Church and the People of Topsail, greatly improving the quality of life there and served the Parish of Topsail from 1860-67. There is no Mention of what happen to him after this period. In Newfoundland: Rev. Charles Palairet of Topsail, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory Modern status: UNKNOWN
PARMENTER: PARMITER, surnames of Englang from Old French parme(n)tier - tailor, or ? Old French parchemintier - maker or seller of parchment. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter). Guppy traced Parminter in Devon, especially in the Barnstaple district. In Newfoundland: John Parmter, granted land at Topsail, 1857 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands) James J. Parmiter, of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Samuel Parmiter, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James J. Parmiter, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Parmenter, rare, at St. John's; Parmiter, at St. John's, Goulds, Harbour Grace and Point Leamington (Green B.)
POWER: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French Pohier - the man from Poix (Picardy), or from Old French povre, poure - poor, or ? from Old French poer - one (em)power(ed) to do something, a herald. MacLysaght notes that the de in the Irish form de Paor should be le, - the poor man, consequent on a vow, POWERS - son of Power appears to be rare. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy traced the variant Poore in Hampshire; Spiegelhalter traced Poore and Power in Devon; MacLysaght traced Power mainly in Waterford and adaccent counties, among the fifty most numerous Irish names. In Newfoundland: Michael Power, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Power, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Power widespread, Powers rare, Poor rare
REAY: surname not mentioned in E.R. Seary's but John Reay was a minister for the Methodists Church all across Newfoundland Especially in the West Coast area. In Newfoundland: Rev. John Reay, Methodist Missionary of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: UNKNOWN
REES(E): surnames of Wales and England, from the Old Welch personal name Ris, Welsh Rhys - ardour. (Reaney, Cottle). See also PRICE, RICE. Guppy traced Rees in herefordshire, Monmouthshire, North Wales and especially South Wales. Spiegelhalter traced Reese in Devon. In Newfoundland: John Rees, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Rees, scattered, especially at Bell Island. Reese, rare
ROACH(E): ROCHE, surnames of England, Roach of France, the Channel Islands, and Ireland, from Old French, Middle English roche - (dweller by the) rock, or from various French and Engish place names. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Dauzat). Guppy traced Roach in Cornwall and Gloucestershire; Spiegelhalter traced Roach and Roch in Devon; MacLysaght found Roche widespread in Ireland. In Newfoundland: John Roach of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Edward Roach, granted land between Topsail and Kelligrews, 1847 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands). Mrs. Roach, hotel of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Richard Roach, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Roach, scattered, Roache, at Topsail. Roche, scattered
RYAN: a surname of Ireland (O)Ryan, O Maoilriain now abbreviated to Oriain, "from an old personal name of obscure meaning." (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght especially in Co. Tipperary. In Newfoundland: Rev. Michael Ryan, PP. RC of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread, throughout all districts.
SCOTT: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland; in Scotland from Old English Scott - an Irishman, later a Geal from Scotland, a name of mysterious origin ? associated with Welsh ysgwthr - cutting, carving, hence the tattooed people; in England - a man from Scotland not necessarily a Geal, and also a personal name; also ? confused with Scutt, ? From Old French escoute, Middle English scut - scout, spy, (Reaney, Cottle, Black). Traced by Guppy especially in the Border counties of England and Scotland, in eastern England, Devon, and (as Scutt) in Dorset, and by MacLysaght in Ulster and Dubin. In Newfoundland: Henry Scott, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread, especially in St. John's and Upper Gullies.
SMITH: SYMTH, surnames of England, Scotland, Ireland and Guernsey (Channel Islands) from Old English smith - smith, blacksmith, farrier, metal-worker, or smiththe - (worker at the) smithy; in Ireland also a synonym of Gow and McGOWAN> "The primate and patriarch of our surnames, its form unchanged for over 1,000 years; forms with medial-y-and final -e are usually both ignorant and affected, though the first may sometimes have been used for clarity next to the minim letter m, and -e may rarely represent 'smithy'….Easily the commonest surname in England and Wales (though JONES is far ahead in Wales alone), Scotland, and U.S.A., and the fifth in Ireland in 1890 … It is thus a frequent victim of hyphenation, either in a sincere effort to advoid ambiguity or in an insincere one to sound distinque; and it has resently gathered to itself many changed foreign surnames. Yet it remains primitive: a smith smites, and his honoured name rings down the ages like an anvil." (Cottle, Turk). Smith found widespead by Guppy in England and Scotland, especially south of the Forth and Clyde and by MacLysaght in Co. Cavan; Smyth traced by Guppy in Devon and Suffolk and by Cottle in Northern Ireland. See also SMYTH. In Newfoundland: George Smith of Topsail, 1835 (Voter's List) Juliana, of Topsail, 1838 (DPHW 26D) George Smith Sr, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Nathaniel Smith , fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Smith , fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread, throughout all districts.
SNOW: a surname of England and Ireland from Old English *snaw - (one with) snow (-white hair), or born or baptized at a time of great snow. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght 73). Traced by Guppy in Devon, Essex and Straffordshire. In Newfoundland: Abram Snow, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Snow, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Snow, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Elijah Snow, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
SOMMERS: SUMMERS, surnames of England and Ireland, ? from Old French somier - sumpter, packhorse man, muleteer; also in Ireland in Connacht for (O) Somahan, O Somachian, Ir. somachan - soft, innocent person, in Ulster occasionally a synonym of MacGovern, Mag Shamhrain, Ir. samhradh - summer. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Somers in Somerset, Summers in Devon, Gloucestershire, Northumberl and and Somerset; MacLysaght traced Somers, Summers in Leinster, Connacht and Ulster. In Newfoundland: Philip Somers, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Somers, scattered. Sommers, at Victoria and Buckans. Summers, scattered.
SQUIRE(S): surnames of England from Old French escuyer, Middle English squyer - shield-bearer, esquier, a young gentelmen attending a knight. (Reaney, Cottle). See also SWYERS. Traced by Guppy in Bedfordshire, Devon, Leicestershire, Ruthlandshire and Nottinghamshire, with Squires "far the least frequent, occurring in Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire." In Newfoundland: Charles Squires, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Squires, fisherman of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Benjamin Squires of Topsail, 1871 (Church Society Reports) William Squires of Topsail, 1871 (Church Society Reports) Azariah Squires, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Nathaniel Squires, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Squires, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Frederick Squires, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Squires, widespread.
STYLES: a surname of England and Ireland from Old English stigol - (dweller by the) stile, steep ascent, or ? a variant of STOYLES. (Reaney, Cottle). Guppy traced Stiles and Styles in Kent, Northamptonshire and Sussex, Spiegelhalter traced Stiles and Styles in Devon. In Newfoundland: William Styles, school teacher of Topsail, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Modern status: Scattered
SWANSBOROUGH: surname not mentioned in E.R. Seary's. Wm. Is shown as a school teacher in New Perlican in 1864-65 Directory and then in Topsail from 1871 to 1904, and then after that nothing. NOTE: IF ANYONE HAS INFORMATION ON WHERE IT CAME FROM, WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU. In Newfoundland: Wm. Swansborough, school teacher of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Wm. Swansborough, school teacher of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: UNKNOWN
TURNER: a surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from Old French to(u)rn(e)or - turner, one who turns or Fashions objects of wood, metal, bone, etc., on a lathe" (OED), but also, as Reaney suggests, possibly - turnspit, translator,One who takes part in a tournment, or as a nickname "turn hare" - one who could outstrip and turn a hare. (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght, Turk). Found widespread by Guppy in England and in the Greenock and Glasgow districts and in Dumfriesshire, and by MacLysaght widely distributed in Ireland. In Newfoundland: Thomas Turner, Sr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Turner, Jr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: scattered
WALSH: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland from Old English woelisc, Middle English walsche - foreigner (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght) See also Wallace, Wallis, Welsh. Traced by Guppy in Lancashire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght as the fourth numerous of Irish surnames. In Newfoundland: Patrick Walsh, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Walsh, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Walsh, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread in all districts
WAUGH: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland from Old English w(e)alh - foreigner. (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght).See also WALSH. WALLIS. WELSH. Traced by Guppy in Northhumberland and Durham and in the Scots Border counties Especially Dumfriesshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in small numbers in all provinces since the mid- Seventeenth century. In Newfoundland: John Waugh, Sr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Waugh, Jr., fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Michael Waugh, fisherman of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Rare at Grand Falls
WOODFORD: a surname of England and Scotland from the English place name Woodford in 10 Countries or the Scots place name in Roxburgshire, or dweller by the ford in the wood. In Newfoundland: Wm. Woodford, MHA Assembly of Topsail, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: scattered, especially in Harbor Main and St. John's

 

 

TRANSCRIBED AND PROVIDED BY: Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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