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Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr. Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood, as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's, although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

 

 

COMMUNITY OF MIDDLE BIGHT/CODNER:

(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

 

 

ANDREWS , BATTEN, BISHOP, BUTLER, COATES, CLOONEY, CLUNEY, FLEET, HAINES, HIBBS, HINDS, KENNEDY, PARMENTER, PETTEN, PORTER, SEARLE, TAYLOR,

 

 
 

 

ANDREWS:		a surname of England and Ireland - son of Andrew, 
			and as Andrew of Scotland, Andros or Andrews of Guersney
			(Channel Islands), from the baptismal name of Greek origin 
			meaning 'manly'.  It is also the anglicized form of the 
			Lebanese surname Andrea, and in Ireland  sometimes a synonym  
			of MacAndrew, Gaelic  Mac Aindriu (Withycombe,Reaney,  
			MacLysaght, Turk).   Guppy found Andrews widespread in 
			southern and western countries, especially Dorset, 
			Jampshire and Wiltshire, and  Andrew  especially in 
			Cornwall and Devon.  McLysaght found Andrews "fairly 
			numerous in Dublin and north-east Ulster, rare elsewhere".
			Black describes Andrew as "common in Scotland, both as a 
			forename and as a surname.  Its popularity, no doubt, is 
			due to its being the name of Scotland's patron saint."

In Newfoundland:	Alfred Andrews, fisherman of Middle Bight, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)

Modern Status:		Widespread

BATTEN: a surname of England, a diminutive of the baptismal name Bartholomew. (Reaney) See BADCOCK. Guppy traced Batten and Batting in Devon and Cornwall. In Newfoundland: James Batten, planter of Middle Bight, 1877 (Rochfort's Directory) Joseph Batten, planter of Middle Bight, 1877 (Rochfort's Directory) William Batten, planter of Middle Bight, 1877 (Rochfort's Directory) Modern status: Associated especially in Foxtrap
BISHOP: a surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the Old English personel name Bisc (e) op, or "a nickname of one which the appearance or bearing of a bishop, or a pageant name from the custom of electing a boy-bishop on St. Nicholas's Day" (Reaney), or one who worked in the household of a bishop; in Ireland, as a synonym by translation of MacAnespie and GILLESPIE. (MacLysaght, Black, Reaney, Cottle, Turk). Guppy and Matthews found the name widespread, especially in the southwest of England. In Newfoundland: John Bishop, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Bishop, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram Bishop, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: widespread
BUTLER: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French bouteillier - servant in charge of the wine-cellar, usually the head servant. "In some early examples, an officer of high rank nominally connected with the supply and importation of wine". (Reany). Later examples may be for Bottler - maker of (leather) bottles. Guppy found Butler widespread. Spiegelhalter traced it in Devon. MacLysaght found it widespread in all provinces except Ulster. Black comments that Butler appears to have been ousted in Scotland by SPENCE. In Newfoundland: John Butler, of Middle Bight (now Codner), 1832 (DPHW 30) John Butler of Middle Bight, 1835 (Voter's List) Charles Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Henry Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Butler, planter of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Butler, sen., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Butler, jun., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Butler, planter of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Butler, planter of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Alfred Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Butler Sr., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Reuben Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Nathaniel Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Matthew Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Wm of Wm Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Butler Jr., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Azariah Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Henry Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Wm of Henry Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Butler, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: widespread
COATES: a surname of England and Scotland, in England from the English place name Cote (s), Coat(e) (s) in 13 countries including Coat (Somerset), from Old English cot(e) - cottage, shelter, woodsman's hut. "In Middle English, when the term was common, the surname may denote a dweller at the cottage (s) or, as it was used especially of a sheep-cote, one employed in the care of animals, a shepherd" (Reaney). In Scotland, Coates is a variant of Coults, from the Scots place name Cults (Aberdeenshire). (Reaney), Cottle, Black. Guppy traced Coate in Somerset and found Coates widespread especially in Yorkshire. In Newfoundland: Charles Coates, school teacher (Upper Gullies), 1864-65 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
CLOONEY: a surname of Ireland, a variant of (O)Cloney, O Cluanaigh, Ir. Cluana - deceitful, flattering, rogue; and in Co. Down a variant of MacLoonie. See also CLUNEY. ( MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Wexford and Down. In Newfoundland: John, fisherman of Middle Bight (now Codner) 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Clooney, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Cluney, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Rare
CLUNEY: a surname of England and as Cluny or Clunie of Scotland, in England from the French place name Cluny (Saone-et-Loire), In Scotland from the Scots place name Clunie (Perthshire). There is also the possibilty of confusion with the Irish familyName CLOONEY. (Reaney, Black). Spiegelhalter traced Cluney in . In Newfoundland: Peter Cluney, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Peter Cluney, farmer of Middle Bight, 1898 (McAlpine's Directory) Jacob Cluney, farmer of Middle Bight, 1898 (McAlpine's Directory) Samuel Cluney, farmer of Middle Bight, 1898 (McAlpine's Directory) Peter Cluney, farmer of Middle Bight, 1904 (McAlpine's Directory) Samuel Cluney, butcher of Middle Bight, 1904 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered, especially in the Harbour Main District.
FLEET: a surname of England from the English place name Fleet (Devon, Lincolnshire), or (dweller by the)estuary or stream. (Reaney, Spiegelhalter). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: Rev. Benjamin Fleet, of Middle Bight, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Rev. B., Fleet, Ch of Englandof Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
HAINES: HAYNES, surnames of England, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the common place name Hayne or Hayes (Devon), or from the Old English (ge)hxg - (dweller by the) enclosure, or from Middle English heyne, haine, hayn - mean, humble, niggardly; in Ireland, also for HYNES (See HINES) in Munster. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght 73, Turk). Guppy traced Haines in Herefordshire, Oxfordshire, and Somerset, Haynes widespread in the Midlands; Spiegelhalter traced Haynes in Devon. In Newfoundland: Henry Hains, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Hains, of Robert, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Hains Sr, planter of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Hains Jr, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Henry Hains, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Hains, Jr., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John of John Hains, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Isaac Hains, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Hains, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert, Haines, Sr., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert of Robt. Hains, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Hains, Sr., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Hains, Jr., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Hains, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Hains, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Hains, Sr., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Haines, scattered. Haynes, scattered.
HIBBS: a surname of England from a petform of the baptismal names Isabel (Elizabeth) from the Hebrew - my God (is) satisfaction, or Ilbert from the Old German personal name Hildeberht containing the elements strife and bright. (Withcombe, Reaney). In Newfoundland: Thomas Hibbs, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
HINDS: a surname of England, from Old English hind - (timid as a) female deer, or a variant of HINE(S). (Reaney). Guppy traced Hind in Leicestershire, Rutlandshire, Lincolnshire and as Hinde, in Nottinghamshire; Spiegelhalter traced Hind in Devon. In Newfoundland: John Hinds, of Middle Bight (now Codner), 1832 (DPHW 30) John Hynes, of Middle Bight, 1835, (Voter's List) Robert Hynes of Middle Bight, 1835, (Voter's List) Modern status: Rare
KENNEDY: a surname of Ireland and Scotland, (O)Kennedy, O Cinneide, Ir. ceann - head, eidigh - ugly, modern Gaelic Ceannaideach. "The Scottish Kennedys are by remote origin Irish Gaels." (MacLysaght, Black). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Tipperary and Wexford, and by Guppy especially in Ayrshire, Dumfrieshire, Invernesshire and Agryleshire. In Newfoundland: John Kennedy, of Middle Bight (now Codner), 1832 (DPHW 30) Edward Kennedy of Middle Bight, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: Widespread.
PARMENTER: PARMITER, surnames of Englang from Old French parme(n)tier - tailor, or ? Old French parchemintier - maker or seller of parchment. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter). Guppy traced Parminter in Devon, especially in the Barnstaple district. In Newfoundland: Richard Parmiter, of Middle Bight, 1835 (Voters List) Richard Parmiter, of Middle Bight (now Codner), 1838 (DPHW 26B, 30) Richard Parmiter, school teacher of Middle Bight, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Richard Parmiter, school teacher, of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Parmenter, rare, at St. John's; Parmiter, at St. John's, Goulds, Harbour Grace and Point Leamington (Green B.)
PETTEN: ? a variant of the surnameof England Petton, from the English place name Petton (Devon, Shropshire). Spiegelhalter traced Petton in Devon. In Newfoundland: John Petten or Petton, of Middle Bight (now Codner), 1832 (DPHW 30) Edward Petten, of Middle Bight, 1835, (Voters List) Edward Pelton Sr, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Pelton Jr,fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Nicholas Pelton, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Petten, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Petten, Sr., fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Nathaniel Petten, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Isaac Petten, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Petten, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Petten, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Petten, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
PORTER: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland, from Old French portier,Anglo-French porter - door-keeper, gate-keeper (of a castle or monastery), or from Old French porteour - carrier, porter. Of the first function, Black comments: "The porter was one of the most important officials connected with the castle or monastic institution. Lands and privileges were attached to the office, and in the case of a royal castle the position was often hereditary. The porter of a religious house was also the distributor of the alms of the convent, for the poor were always supplied ad portam monasterii, at the gate of the monastery. He also kept the keys and had power to refuse admission to those whom he deemed unworthy." (Reaney, Cottle, Black). Traced by Guppy in thirteen countries and by Spiegelhalter also in Devon. MacLysaght comments: "Though essentially English in origin there are few names which occur more widly in every kind of Irish record relating to all the provinces, except Connacht, from the 13th century to modern times. It is numerous now especially in Ulster." In Newfoundland: Benjamin Porter, fisherman of Middle Bight, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Moden status: Widespread, especially at Foxtrap, Long Pond
SEARLE: a surname of England from the Old German personal names Sarilo, Serila, in Norman-French Serlo, ? related to Old English searu - armour. "The name was frequent in Normandy and common in England after the Conquest." (Reaney). See also EARLE. Guppy traced Searle in Cambridgeshire, Cornwall and Devon. Searles traced in Cornwall. In Newfoundland: Charles Serle, planter of Middle Bight (now Codner), 1838 (DPHW 30) Modern status: At Bell Island, and in the Harbour Main district.
TAYLOR: a surname of England and Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, with Tayler of Guernsey from Old French tailleor, Anglo- French tailleur- tailor. (Reaney, Black , MacLysaght, Turk). Found widespread by Guppy in England and Scotland, and by MacLysaght in Ulster and Dublin. In Newfoundland: Jacob Taylor of Middle Bight, 1835 (Voters List) Abram Taylor, planter of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Jacob Taylor, planter of Middle Bight, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Abraham Taylor, planter of Middle Bight, 1877 (Rochfort's Directory) Jacob Taylor, planter of Middle Bight, 1877 (Rochfort's Directory) Modern Status: Widespread

 

 

TRANSCRIBED AND PROVIDED BY: Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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