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As always, confirm these, as you would any other source material.

 

 

Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe
that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these
Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood
and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr.
Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood,
as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's,
although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match
for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The
people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

 

 

COMMUNITY OF LONG POND/MANUELS:

(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

 

 

ADE , ATKINS, BAIRD, BATTEN, BISHOP, BRIAN(D), BURNS, BUTLER, CHRISTOPHER, COLLETT, CONWAY, CURRAN, DAWE, DONOVAN, EASON, GREENSLADE, HADDEN, HENNESSEY, HISCOCK, JANES, JEFFERIES, JEFFORD, KELLY, KENN(E)Y, KENNEDY, LAWRENCE, LYONS, MCGRATH, MILLER, MORAN, MORGAN, MURPHY, NEAL(E), NOSEWORTHY, NUGENT, O'LEARY, PARMENTER, PERRIN, PETTEN, PORTER, PURCELL, READER , RIDEOUT, ROACH(E), SEARLE, SMITH, SQUIRE(S), STANLEY, STARES, SULLLIVAN, SWEETMAN, TAYLOR, TOBIN, WALSH, WHITE, WILLIAMS

 

 
 

 

ADE:			a surname of England and  France;  in England 
			a pet form of the baptismal name Adam (see ADAMS), in France
			where it is also an old  baptismal name, from a Germanic 
			source ? adal - noble. (Reaney, Dauzat  69).

In Newfoundland:	Family Tradition:  The Ades of Long Pond, Manuels, 
			the only family of the name, believe 
			themselves to be of Irish stock, though Ade is not 
			recorded in MacLysaght, Woulfe or Matheson. Edward 
			Aid, fisherman of Long Pond, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)
			Edward Aide, fisherman of Long Pond, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)
			James Aide, fisherman of Long Pond, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)

Modern Status:		At Long Pond, Manuels

ATKINS: A surname of England and Ireland, a diminutive of Adam (See ADAMS and also AIKEN, ATKINSON). (Reaney, MacLysaght). Guppy found Atkins (Adkins) widespread, especially in Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Warwickshire; Matthews maintains a Devon and Dorset origin; MacLysaght found Atkins epecially in Co. Cork. In Newfoundland: Dianna Atkin, born at Emmanuels (Manuels?), 1812 (DPHW 30) George Athius of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) George Atkins, of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Atkins, fisherman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Atkins, fisherman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Jacob Atkins, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Frederick Atkins, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: small concentrations at St. John's and Bell Island.
BAIRD: a surname of Scotland and Ireland, believed by Cottle and MacLysaght, for example, to be derived from the Gaelic bard - bard, but by Black to be derived from a Scots place name. Guppy traced Baird in the Glasgow district; MacLysaght found it numerous in Cos. Antrim and Down (Ulster). In Newfoundland: Family tradition - James (1832-1909), of Long Pond, Manuels (Mun Folklore). James Baird, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Barid, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Baird, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Baird, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Albert Baird, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Baird, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Andrew Baird, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Baird, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: Especially at Long Pond and Manuels.
BATTEN: a surname of England, a diminutive of the baptismal name Bartholomew. (Reaney) See BADCOCK. Guppy traced Batten and Batting in Devon and Cornwall. In Newfoundland: Thomas Batten, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Associated especially in Foxtrap
BISHOP: a surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the Old English personel name Bisc (e) op, or "a nickname of one which the appearance or bearing of a bishop, or a pageant name from the custom of electing a boy-bishop on St. Nicholas's Day" (Reaney), or one who worked in the household of a bishop; in Ireland, as a synonym by translation of MacAnespie and GILLESPIE. (MacLysaght, Black, Reaney, Cottle, Turk). Guppy and Matthews found the name widespread, especially in the southwest of England. In Newfoundland: John Bishop of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) John Bishop, of Long Pond (Conception B.), 1847 (DPHW 26D) Charles Bishop, Jun, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Bishop, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Bishop, of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Nathaniel Bishop, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Henry Bishop, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Bishop, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Eli Bishop, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: widespread
BRIAN(D): (O) BRIEN, BRYAN (T), surnames, in one or more of the preceding variants, of England, Scotland, Ireland and France, from a Breton personal name containing the element bri - height, dignity, esteem (Dauzat, Black), or from a " Keltic (Old Welsh/Irish) name containing the element bre - hill" (Cottle), of simular form and significance. See also BRYNE. (MacLysaght, Reaney). As a baptismal name "Brian or Bryan has from early times been a favourite in Ireland on account of the national hero Brian Boroimhe; but it was, during the Middle Ages, equally popular in England...[when] for several centuries it was a favourite, as the many commom surnames derived from it testlfy....it survived in Yorks [hire] Westmoreland, Cheshire, Lanc [ashire] until the 18th century, but gradually fell into disuse and came to be regarded as as exclusively Irish name. It is still used in Brittany and has come back into use in England durin the present century" (Withycomb). As a family name in England, Reaney, who gives twelve variants, maintains that in the south it is a Breton personal name introduced by the Normans, and, according to Black, "by Bretons who among the Normans in the invasion of England", but in the north "it is O[ld] Ir [ish] Brian, bought by Norsemen from Iceland...to Cumberland and across the Pennines into Yorkshire." In Scotland, Black cites the forms Brian, Brien and Bryan, ans ascribes the Breton origin to them, as does Dauzat, Briant, Briend. In Ireland, MacLysaght sees the family O'Brien, O'Briain "deriving from the famiy of King Brian Boru", but notices that O'Brien may also be a synonym of O'Bryne (SEE BRYNE), of Bryan, and of MacBryan, Mac Braoin. Guppy traced Bryan widespread, especially in Leicestershire and Rutlandshire and Oxfordshire, Bryant especially in Somerset and Wiltshire. Spiegalehalter traced Brian, Bryan (t) in Devon. Matthews traced Brien, Bryan in Ireland, Devon and Dorset. Briant and Bryant in Devon. MacLysaght found O'Brien "now very numerous in other provinces as well as Munster, being the fifth most numerous name in Ireland", Bryan " The name of a prominent Anglo-Norman family settled in Co. Kilkenny", and MacBryan, sometimes changed to O'Brien in Cos. Fermanagh and Cavan. In Newfoundland: James Brien, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: O'Brien - widespread especially at Bell Island and Topsail
BURNS: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland, ? from a nickname - burn house, or (dweller by the) burn (s) - stream (s),or from the Scots place name Burnhouse. " The forefathers of Robert Burns migrated from Burnhouse in Taynuilt to Forfarshire (now Angus) where they were called Campbells of Burnhouse, and later Burness or Burns... The stress Burness was on the first syllable and as the name was pronounced in Ayrshire as if written Burns, Robert and his brother agreed to drop Burness and to assume Burns in April 1786 (Reaney after Black). In Ireland, Burns is widely used for O'Beirne, Bittane and BYRNE, and is also the modern form of Mac Conboirne. (MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Cumberland and Westmoreland and in the Glasgow district and Perthshire; by MacLysaght in Ulster and to a lesser extent in Munster. See also BYRNE (S). In Newfoundland: Thomas Burns, of Long Pond, 1841 (DPHW 26D) Modern Status: scattered
BUTLER: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French bouteillier - servant in charge of the wine-cellar, usually the head servant. "In some early examples, an officer of high rank nominally connected with the supply and importation of wine". (Reany). Later examples may be for Bottler - maker of (leather) bottles. Guppy found Butler widespread. Spiegelhalter traced it in Devon. MacLysaght found it widespread in all provinces except Ulster. Black comments that Butler appears to have been ousted in Scotland by SPENCE. In Newfoundland: Anne Butler, of Long Pond, 1837 (DPHW 26D) Isaac Butler, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: widespread
CHRISTOPHER: a baptismal name and surname of England and Ireland, Latin Chistopherus from Greek - Christ - bearing, "origenally a word applied by Christians to themselves, meaning that they bore Christ in their hearts. St Christopher was an early Christian martyr, to whose name was later attached the legend of a gigantic saint who carried the Christ-child across a river, and Christopher became an ordinary Christopher name. The sight of the image of St.Christopher was thought to be a protection from accidents and sudden death for the rest of the day" (Withycombe). (Reaney). Spiegelhalter traced Christopher (s) in Hampshire; MacLysaght traced Christopher in Co Waterford. In Newfoundland: John Christopher, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
COLLETT: a surname of England, Collet of France, a double diminutive of the baptismal name Nicholas, or occasionally in England an aphetic form of acolyte, and in France also from collet - (maker or seller of) collar(s), or porter, carrier. (Reaney, Dauzat). Guppy traced Collett in Oxfordshire and Wiltshire, Collet in Cambridgeshire. Matthews traced Collet in Devon. In Newfoundland: Robert Collett, cod oil manufacturer of Long Pond , 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
CONWAY: a surname of England and Ireland; in England from the Welsh place name Conway, "one of the few Welsh towns that have Originated a surname". (Barsley); In Ireland, the anglicized form of several Gaelic surnames, Mac Connmhaigh, Ir. Condmach Head smashing, Mac Conmidhe - hound of Meath, O' Conbhiudhe, Ir. Con - hound and buidhe - yellow, and O' Connmhachain (Bardsley, Cottle, MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Clare, Tyrone, Sligo and Mayo. In Newfoundland: Thomas Conway of Long Pond 1871, (Lovell's Directory) Modern Status: widespread, especially at Colliers, St. John's and St. Bride's
CURRAN: a surname of Ireland, Currane in Co. Kerry, O Corrain, but also for (Mac)Curreen, Curren, Mac Corraidhin and (O) Curreen, Currin, O Cuirin. (MacLysaght). See also CAREEN. MacLysaght found (O) Curran "now numerous in all the provinces." In Newfoundland: John Curran, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
DAWE: a surname of England, either a diminutive of the baptismal name David (See Davey), or from Old English *dawe, Middle English dawe - jackdaw, ? a nickname for a petty thief, (Reaney, Cottle). Traced by Guppy in Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. In Newfoundland: Samuel Dawe, of Long Pond, 1836 (DPHW 26D) Jonathan Daw, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Abraham Dawe, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Dawe, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Dawe, Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Dawe, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Isaac Dawe, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Dawe, Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Zacharias Dawe, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Dawe, Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Dawe, Sr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jonathan Dawe, Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Andrew Dawe, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Dawe, Sr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jonathan Dawe, Sr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John James Dawe, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread
DONOVAN: a surname of Ireland (O)Donovan, O Donnabhain. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght originally in Co. Limerick, later in Cos, Cork and Kilkenny. In Newfoundland: Patrick of Long Pond, 1843 (Newfoundlander 22 Jun 1843) Modern status: Scattered
EASON: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland; in England ? a variant of EASTON; in Scotland - son of Adam (See ADAMS); in Ireland, of Scots origin or an anglicization of Mac Aoidh. (Spiegelhalter, Reaney, Black, MacLysaght). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by Black in Angus. In Newfoundland: Family tradition: The Easons of Long Pond and Manuels are believed to have come to Newfoundland from Norway (MUN Folklore). William Easson of Long Pond,1832 (DPHW 30) William Leeson of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) John Eason, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Eason, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Easons, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Isaac Easons, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Easons, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Long Pond and Manuels.
GREENSLADE: a surname of England and Guernsey (Channel Islands), from the English place name Greenslade (Devon), or (dweller by or in the) green valley. (Spiegelhalter, Turk). Traced by Guppy in Devon and Somerset. In Newfoundland: Matthew, of Long Pond (South Shore Conception B.) 1825 (DPHW 26B) Matthew Greenslit of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) Henry Greenslt of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) Matthew Greenslade, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Greenslade, Sr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Greenslade, Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Greenslade, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Greenslade, Sr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Greenslade, Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Greenslade, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Greenslade Sr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Greenslade, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Peter Greenslade, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Matthew Greenslade, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Henry Greenslade, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Greenslade, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: In the Harbour Main district, especially at Long Pond.
HADDEN: a surname of England, Ireland and Scotland; in England, from the place names Haddon, Hadden (Derbyshire, Dorset, Northamptonshire, Devon); in Ireland also as a synonym of (O)Hadian; In Scotland, a variant of Howden. (Cottle, Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght, Black). Haddon traced by Guppy in Northhamptonshire and Warwickshire and by Spiegelhalter in Devon; Hadden, Haddon, by MacLysaght in Ulster and Co. Louth; and Hadden by Black in Aberdeenshire. In Newfoundland: John Haddon, Inspector of Protestant School of Long Pond, (Topsail) 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) John, of Long Pond (Conception B.), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
HENNESSEY: a surname of Ireland, (O) Hennessy, OhAonghusa - descendant of Angus. (MacLysaght). See HINCHEY. Traced by MacLysaght in Munster. In Newfoundland: James John Hennessey, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
HISCOCK: HISCOTT, surnames of England, diminutives of Hitch (Richard) (See RICHARDS) of from the English place name Hiscott (Devon). (Reaney, Spiegelhalter). See ALCOCK. Traced by Guppy in Berkshire, Dorset, Somerset and Wiltshire, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: William Hiscock, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Hiscock, widespread. Hiscott, rare at Bell Island.
JANES: a surname of England, a form of JOHNS. See JOHN. Traced by Guppy in Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire, Jane in Cornwall. Spiegelhalter traced Jane(s) in Devon. In Newfoundland: O.B., of Long Pond Lookout, 1803 (CO 199.18) Modern status: Widespread
JEFFERIES: JEFFERS, JEFFERY, three of no less them some 23 variants of a surname of England and Ireland, with Jeffreys of Guernsey (Channel Islands), from Old French Geoffroi, Geufffoi, Middle English Geffrey, which may represent three Old German personal names in which the second element is peace.In Ireland, Jeffers may occasionally be for MacShaffery, MacSeafraidh. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). Guppy traced Jefferies, Jeffreys in Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Gloucestershire, Monmouthshire, Somerset, Suffolk and Wiltshire, noting that Jefferies is the usual form, Jeffreys occurs in Wiltshire and Monmouthshire, Jeffries in Suffolk, and Jefferys "characteristic of Wiltshire." He also traced Jeeffery in Cornwall, Derbyshire Devon, Dorset, Somerset and Wiltshire, noting that Jeffrey is a rare form found mostly in Cornwall, where it is associated with Jeffery, Jefferiss, Jeffrey, Jeffries in Devon. MacLysaght found Jeffers "formerly mainly in Cos. Cork and Carlow and in Dubin, Jeffares in Co. Waterford. Jeffers is now numerous in Belfast and adjoining Ulster countries." In Newfoundland: William (and brothers), of Long Pond (Conception B.) 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Jefferies, scattered. Jeffery, rare.
JEFFORD: a surname of England, a variant of GIFFORD. Spiegelhalter traced Jefferd, Jefford in Devon. In Newfoundland: William Gifford, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James John Gifford, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: At Long Pond, Manuels and Kelligrews
KELLY: with a rare variant O'KELLEY, surnames of England, Ireland and Scotland; in England from the English place name Kelly (Devon), Cornish celli - wood, grove; in Ireland and Scotland for (Mac) Kelly, Mac Cealliagh or O'KELLY, O Ceallaigh, ? Ir. ceallach - strife; also in Scotland from the Scots place name Kelly (Angus, Renfrewshire) or Kellie (Fife). (Reaney, MacLysaght, Black). MacLysaght remarks that MacKelly and O'Kelly are indistinguishable now that the Mac and O have been widely dropped, though he notes that O is being to some extent resumed. Traced by Guppy in Cornwall and Devon and the Scots Border countries, and by MacLysaght from MacKelly in east Connacht and from O'Kelly throughout Ireland where it is the second commonest name. In Newfoundland: Joseph Kelly of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: Kelley, scattered. Kelly, widespread, O'Kelly, rare at Avondale
KENN(E)Y: surnames of England and Ireland; in England ? a variant of KENWAY; in Ireland sometimes of English origin,but usually from MacKenny, an Ulster variant of MACKENNA, or (O) Kenny, O Cionaoith, ? Ir. cionaodh - fire-sprung, or a synonym of KINNEY or Kilkenny. (MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced (O)Kenny in Cos. Donegal and Galway. In Newfoundland: Thomas, granted land at Upper Long Pond, 1845 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands). Modern status: Kenney, rare. Kenny, scattered.
KENNEDY: a surname of Ireland and Scotland, (O)Kennedy, O Cinneide, Ir. ceann - head, eidigh - ugly, modern Gaelic Ceannaideach. "The Scottish Kennedys are by remote origin Irish Gaels." (MacLysaght, Black). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Tipperary and Wexford, and by Guppy especially in Ayrshire, Dumfrieshire, Invernesshire and Agryleshire. In Newfoundland: John Kennedy, of Long Pond Lookout, 1803 (CO 199.18) Absalom Kennedy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Kennedy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Kennedy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Uriah Kennedy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Kennedy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jacob Kennedy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Kennedy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Kennedy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread.
LAWRENCE: (or Laurence), a baptismal name and surname of England, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the Latin Laurentius - of Laurentum (a city), ? ultimately from Latin laurus - bay tree. St.Laurence the Deacon, martyred at Rome in 258, was a favourite saint in the Middle Ages. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). See also REEVE(S). Traced by Guppy especially in the south and west of England, and by MacLysaght in Ireland though "not closely identified wiyh any particular locality," In Newfoundland: John Lawrence, of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
LYONS: a surname of England and Ireland,Lyon of England and Scotland, "Either from Lyon, the popular pronunciation of Leo and Leon,or a nickname from the lion," or from the French place name Lyons-la-Foret (Eure), or from an inn sigh; in Ireland for O Laighin in Co. Galway, eslewhere usually Lyne, or for O Liathain in Co. Cork, eslewhere Lehane. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black). Guppy traced Lyon in Lancashire; Spiegelhalter traced Lyon(s) in Devon; and MacLysaght traced Lyons in Cos. Cork and Galway. In Newfoundland: Thomas Lines, fisherman of Long Pond, 1841 (DPHW 39) Modern status: Bell Island (Electors 1955), Avondale.
MCGRATH: a surname of Ireland MacGraith, the Irish equivalent of the surname of Scotland McCRAE. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLsaght in Cos. Clare, Donegal, Fermanagh and Waterford. In Newfoundland: Rev. Jas J. McGrath, PP. Roman Catholic of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread.
MILLER: a surname a England, Ireland and Scotland, from Middle English mylne - mill or Old Norse mylnari - miller. Miller is an assimilated formof Milner. Millar is a Scots form. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black). Guppy traced Miller in 14 counties in England, and Millar and Miller over the greater part of Scotland though rare in the North. MacLysaght found Millar and Miller very numerous in Co. Antrim and adjacent countries. In Newfoundland: Thomas Miller, of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) William Miller of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) Thomas Miller, of Manuels, 1838 (DPHW 30) Modern status: Widespread.
MORAN: a surname of ireland, (O) Moran, the anglicized form of O Morain and O Moghrain and (Mac) Morran. (MacLysaght). See MURREN. Traced by MacLysaght especially in Connaght. In Newfoundland: Edward, granted land at Upper Long Pond, 1838 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands) Modern status: Scattered.
MORGAN: a surname of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, and a baptismal name in Wales, from an Old Celtic name Morcant, Morgan containing the elements sea and ? bright; in Ireland also the anglicized form of several Irish surnames. See MERRIGAN. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black, Withycombe). Traced by Guppy especially in Monmouthshire ans South and North Wales, by Black in Aberdeenshire, and by MacLysaght in Cos. Armagh, Monaghan, Belfast and Dublin and eslewhere. In Newfoundland: James Morgan, fisherman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Morgan, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Morgan, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Ezekiel Morgan, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Alfred Morgan, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread, especially at Indian Pond , Seal Cove, Upper Gullies.
MURPHY: a surname of Ireland and Scotland, (O) Murphy, O Murchadha, Ir. murchadh - sea-warrior, or Mac Murphy, Mac Murchada. MacLysaght notes that the "resumption of the prefixes O and Mac, which is a modern tendency with most Gaelic names, has not taken place in the case of Murphy, " that the majority of the Murphys in Ulster were probably oringinally Mac Murphy, and that Murphy is the most common name in Ireland. It occurs in Scotland from Irish immigration. (MacLysaght, Cottle). In Newfoundland: James Murphy, granted land near Middle Long Pond, 1836 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands) Modern status: Widespread
NEAL(E): (O)NEIL(L), variants of a bartismal name and surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and as Neal(e) of the Channel Islands, Neil and formerly Neel of Jersey, probably name Niall - champion. Reaney comments: "The name was carried to Iceland by the Scandinavians as Njall, taken to Norway, then top France and brought to England by the Normans. It was also introduced direct into north-west England by Norwegians from Ireland. It was usually latinized as Nigellue through an incorret association with niger - black." (Withycombe, Reaney, Black, MacLysaght, Turk). Guppy found Neal(e) widespread in England, Neil in Ayrshire. MacLysaght found MacNeil, from the westren isles of Scotland in Cos. Antrim and Derry since the fourteenth century, and (O)Neill numerous throughout Ireland, especially in Cos. Tyrone and Antrin. In Newfoundland: William Neal of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) Samuel Neal, of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Neal Sr, fisherman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Neal Jr, fisherman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Neil, Sr., fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Neil, Jr., fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Martin Neil, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Neal, scattered. Neale, unique. Neil, scattered. O'Neil, scattered. O'Neill, scattered.
NOSEWORTHY: a surname of England from the English place name Norsworthy (Devon) - North's homestead. (Spiegelhalter, Gover). Guppy traced Nosworthy, Spiegelhalter also Norsworthy in Devon. In Newfoundland: Jacob Noseworthy, of Long Pond ( Manuels), 1832 (DPHW 30) Jacob Noseworthy of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) Edward Noseworthy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Noseworthy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Peter Noseworthy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James John Noseworthy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Noseworthy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Lawrence Noseworthy, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread, especially at Bell Island, Lond Pond.
NUGENT: a surname of Ireland, Nuiseann,from the Norman surname de Nogent. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Cork and Westmeath. In Newfoundland: John Nugent, boarding house of Long Pond (Lower Gullies), 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Riverdale and Kelligrews.
O'LEARY: LEARY, surnames of Ireland (with a ? Newfoundland variant LEARIE, O Laoghaire. "Laoghaire was one of the best known personal names in ancient Ireland" interpreted by Woulfe as calf-keeper. (MacLysaght, Woulfe). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Cork. In Newfoundland: Edward, granted land at Upper Long Pond, 1852 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands) Modern status: Learie, rare. O'Leary, scattered.
PARMENTER: PARMITER, surnames of Englang from Old French parme(n)tier - tailor, or ? Old French parchemintier - maker or seller of parchment. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter). Guppy traced Parminter in Devon, especially in the Barnstaple district. In Newfoundland: Richard Parmiter, of Manuels, 1825, (DPHW 26B, 30) Modern status: Parmenter, rare, at St. John's; Parmiter, at St. John's, Goulds, Harbour Grace and Point Leamington (Green B.)
PERRIN: a surname of England, France and the Channel Islands, a diminutive of P(i)erre (Peter). See PETERS. (Reaney, Cottle, Dauzat, Turk). Traced by Guppy in Devon. In Newfoundland: John, of Long Pond ( ? Manuels), 1832 (DPHW 30) Charles Perring, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Perring, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Richard Perring, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Perran, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Perran, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Perrran, Sr. fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Perran, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Perran, Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Benjamin Perran, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: At Long Pond, Manuels.
PETTEN: ? a variant of the surnameof England Petton, from the English place name Petton (Devon, Shropshire). Spiegelhalter traced Petton in Devon. In Newfoundland: Henry Petten, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Petten, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Petten, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
PORTER: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland, from Old French portier,Anglo-French porter - door-keeper, gate-keeper (of a castle or monastery), or from Old French porteour - carrier, porter. Of the first function, Black comments: "The porter was one of the most important officials connected with the castle or monastic institution. Lands and privileges were attached to the office, and in the case of a royal castle the position was often hereditary. The porter of a religious house was also the distributor of the alms of the convent, for the poor were always supplied ad portam monasterii, at the gate of the monastery. He also kept the keys and had power to refuse admission to those whom he deemed unworthy." (Reaney, Cottle, Black). Traced by Guppy in thirteen countries and by Spiegelhalter also in Devon. MacLysaght comments: "Though essentially English in origin there are few names which occur more widly in every kind of Irish record relating to all the provinces, except Connacht, from the 13th century to modern times. It is numerous now especially in Ulster." In Newfoundland: Theophilus, fisherman of Long Pond, 1840 (DPHW 30) George Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Jonathan Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Nathan Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Richard Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Samuel Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Abraham Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Porter Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jacob Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Porter Sr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jonathan Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Porter Sr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Porter, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jacob Porter, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Porter, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread, especially at Foxtrap, Long Pond
PURCELL: a surname of England and Ireland from Old French pourcel - piglet, a nickname. (Reaney, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Purssell in Buckinghamshire, Spiegelhalter Pursell in Devon and MacLysaght Purcell in Co. Tipperary. In Newfoundland: James, granted land near Upper Long Pond, 1844 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands) Modern status: Scattered
READER: a surname of England, from Middle English redyn - to thatch with reed, hence a thatcher. (Reaney, Cottle). Traced by Reaney especially in Norfolk. In Newfoundland: Robert Reader, school teacher of Long Pond, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Modern status: Scattered
RIDEOUT: a surname of England, ? a nickname for a rider, probably as Cottle suggests from some lost joke. (Reaney, Cottle). Guppy traced Rideout in Dorset; Spiegelhalter traced Rideout in Devon. In Newfoundland: Family tradition: -------, from Yorkshire, settled at Long Pond (Conception B.) (MUN Folklore). Richard Ridout (1815-1907), from England, settled in Conception Bay South area; the spelling of the surname was later changed to Rideout (MUN Geog.) Ridout, of Long Pond, 1832 (DPHW 30) Appollos Ridout, planter of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Rueben Ridout, planter of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Ridout, planter of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Ridout, planter of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Ridout, planter of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Benjamin Ridout, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Ridout, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Noah Ridout, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Ridout, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Ridout, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Job Ridout, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Solomon Ridout, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Ridout, Jr., fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abraham Ridout, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread, especially at Long Pond
ROACH(E): ROCHE, surnames of England, Roach of France, the Channel Islands, and Ireland, from Old French, Middle English roche - (dweller by the) rock, or from various French and Engish place names. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Dauzat). Guppy traced Roach in Cornwall and Gloucestershire; Spiegelhalter traced Roach and Roch in Devon; MacLysaght found Roche widespread in Ireland. In Newfoundland: Patrick Roach, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Roach, scattered, Roache, at Topsail. Roche, scattered
SEARLE: a surname of England from the Old German personal names Sarilo, Serila, in Norman-French Serlo, ? related to Old English searu - armour. "The name was frequent in Normandy and common in England after the Conquest." (Reaney). See also EARLE. Guppy traced Searle in Cambridgeshire, Cornwall and Devon. Searles traced in Cornwall. In Newfoundland: Samuel Searle, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Samuel Searle, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: At Bell Island, and in the Harbour Main district.
SMITH: SYMTH, surnames of England, Scotland, Ireland and Guernsey (Channel Islands) from Old English smith - smith, blacksmith, farrier, metal-worker, or smiththe - (worker at the) smithy; in Ireland also a synonym of Gow and McGOWAN> "The primate and patriarch of our surnames, its form unchanged for over 1,000 years; forms with medial-y-and final -e are usually both ignorant and affected, though the first may sometimes have been used for clarity next to the minim letter m, and -e may rarely represent 'smithy' .Easily the commonest surname in England and Wales (though JONES is far ahead in Wales alone), Scotland, and U.S.A., and the fifth in Ireland in 1890 It is thus a frequent victim of hyphenation, either in a sincere effort to advoid ambiguity or in an insincere one to sound distinque; and it has resently gathered to itself many changed foreign surnames. Yet it remains primitive: a smith smites, and his honoured name rings down the ages like an anvil." (Cottle, Turk). Smith found widespead by Guppy in England and Scotland, especially south of the Forth and Clyde and by MacLysaght in Co. Cavan; Smyth traced by Guppy in Devon and Suffolk and by Cottle in Northern Ireland. See also SMYTH. In Newfoundland: Robert, of Manuels, 1832 (DPHW 30) William Smith of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) Robert Smith of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) John Smith Sr, fisherman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Smith Jr, farmer of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Smith Sr, fisherman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Smith Jr, of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Smith Sr, farmer of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Smith Jr, fisherman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Smith, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Smith, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Smith, Sr., fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Smith, Jr., fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Albert Smith, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Smith, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Smith, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Smith, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Smith, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread, throughout all districts.
SQUIRE(S): surnames of England from Old French escuyer, Middle English squyer - shield-bearer, esquier, a young gentelmen attending a knight. (Reaney, Cottle). See also SWYERS. Traced by Guppy in Bedfordshire, Devon, Leicestershire, Ruthlandshire and Nottinghamshire, with Squires "far the least frequent, occurring in Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire." In Newfoundland: Benjamin Squires of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) George Squires, publican of Long Pond, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) George Squires, policeman of Manuels, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Squires, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Squires, widespread.
STANLEY: a surname of England and Ireland from the English place name Stanley (in 12 countries) - stony field or clearing. (Cottle, MacLysaght), Traced by Guppy in Gloucestershire and Warwickshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon and byb MacLysaght in Leinster and Munster. In Newfoundland: Famliy tradition, John (1810-70), from England, settled at Long Pond (Conception Bay South) in 1840 (MUN Geog.) Charles, of Long Pond, 1832 (DPHW 30) John Stanley of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) John Stanley, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Stanley, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Stanley, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Stanley, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Elijah Stanley, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Stanley, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Stanley, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Stanley, Jr.,fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
STARES: ? a variant of England SREAR, Steer(e)(s), from Old English steor - (one like, or a keeper of the) steer(s), young ox(en). (Reaney, Cottle). Guppy traced Stares in Hampshire; Spiegelhalter traced Stear, Steer(e) in Devon. In Newfoundland: John Steer, granted land at Upper Long Pond, 1863 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands) Modern status: Stares, at Bell Island.
SULLIVAN: a surname of Ireland (0) Sullivan, 0 Su'ileabha'in, Ir. suil - eye, with last part of the nameuncertain. (MacLysaght).The third most numerous name in Ireland, traced by MacLysaght especially in Cos. Cork and Kerry. In Newfoundland: James Sullivan, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: Widespread
SWEETMAN: This surname does not show in E.R. Seary's, however, they were first recorded as Nicholas marrying in Hr. Main parish in the Early 1863 with John as a witness's. There was also Sweetman females who married males from Hr. Main as well. In Newfoundland: John Sweetman, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Sweetman, fisherman of Long Pond, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Sweetman, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Sweetman, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: unknown
TAYLOR: a surname of England and Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, with Tayler of Guernsey from Old French tailleor, Anglo- French tailleur- tailor. (Reaney, Black , MacLysaght, Turk). Found widespread by Guppy in England and Scotland, and by MacLysaght in Ulster and Dublin. In Newfoundland: John Taylor of Long Pond, 1835 (Voter's List) Joseph Taylor, of Long Pond, 1837 Richard Taylor, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Taylor, fisherman of Long Pond, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Taylor, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Taylor, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Taylor, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Solomon Taylor, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Taylor, fisherman of Long Pond, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: Widespread
TOBIN: a surname of England and Ireland, a variant of the surname of England St. Aubyn, or of France St. -Aubin, both from various localities in France St. -Aubin (Aisne, Aube, etc.) (Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Kilkenny and Tipperary. In Newfoundland: Thomas Tobin, fisherman of Manuels, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread
WALSH: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland from Old English woelisc, Middle English walsche - foreigner (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght) See also Wallace, Wallis, Welsh. Traced by Guppy in Lancashire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght as the fourth numerous of Irish surnames. In Newfoundland: Martin, of Manuels 1822 (CO 194.65) Michael Walsh of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: Widespread in all districts
WHITE: WHYTE, surnames of England, Scotland and Ireland, White of Channel Islands from the Old English personal name Hwita, a shortened form of names brgining with Hwit - , or a nickname from Old English hwit - white, fair (of complextion or hair), or from Old English *with - (dweller by the) bend, curve (in a river or road), or from Norman French waite - lookout, place to watch from, or by confusion with WIGHT; also in Scotland an anglicization of the Gaelic M'Illebhain (MacGhillebhain); in Ireland also for such names as Bane, Bawn, Galligan, Kilbane, by translation or Ir. ban - white, geal - white. (Reaney , Cottle, Black, MacLysaght, Turk). See also WHITT, LEBLANC. Guppy found White widespread in England, White and Whyte south or the Forth and Clyde; MacLysaght found White numerous in every province since the 14th century and especially in Cos. Down and Sligo. In Newfoundland: James, of Emanuels (Manuels), 1822 (DPHW 26B) Belinda, of Long Pond (Harbour Main district), 1837 (DPHW 26D) Modern status: White, widespread in all districts.
WILLIAMS: a surname of England, Wales, Ireland and the Channel Islands, - son of William, a baptismal name from the Old German personal name Willahelm containing the elements vilja - will and helma - hemet, which became Guihielm and later Guillaume in French and was introduced into England by the Normans. Surnames derived from William and its diminutive include; WILLIAMS, Williamson, WILLS, WILSON, WILCOX, WILLMONT, WILLETT, WILKINS, GIL(I)AM. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). See also PARSONS. Found widespread by Guppy in the Midlands and southwest, especially in Monmouthshire, and in North and South Wales, and by MacLysaght numerous in all provinces of Ireland. In Newfoundland: William, of Manuels, 1803 (CO 199.18) William Williams, Sr., of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) William Williams, Jr., of Manuels, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: Widespread.

 

 

TRANSCRIBED AND PROVIDED BY: Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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