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As always, confirm these, as you would any other source material.

 

 

Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe
that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these
Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood
and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr.
Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood,
as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's,
although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match
for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The
people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

 

 

COMMUNITY OF KELLIGREWS:


(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

 

 

ANTHONY , BISHOP, CLOONEY, CLUNEY, CRAIG, CRONIN, DAWE, DOMIN(E)Y, DWYER, FAGAN, FARRELL, FURNEAUX, GILLINGHAM, GORMAN, GREENSLADE, GRIFFIN, HARVEY, HENNESSY, HIBBS, HICKEY, HODGE, HOOKEY, HUSSEY, JOY, KING, LEDREW, MERCER, MUGFORD, NEWELL, NOSEWORTHY, NUGENT, PARMENTER, ROACH(E), ROGERS, SIMMONS, SNOW, STYLES, TILLEY, WALSH, WHITTEN,

 

 
 

 

ANTHONY:		a baptismal name and surname of England, Wales and 
			Ireland,   Ant (h) oine  of France,  Anthony and 
			Ant (h) oine of the Channel Islands,  from the Latin 
			personal name  Antonius, of unknown origin, the name 
			of many saints.Withycombe comments on the spelling 
			and pronuncation:  "The intrusive  h   in the spelling  
			Anthony was a later development, and seems not to 
			appear before the late 16th century.   It may have 
			been the result of false etymologizing, for Camden 
			(1605) derives the name from Greek  anthos  (flower).  
			The  h  is, of course, silent, but there is some
			danger nowadays of a spelling pronuncation (already 
			in use in USA),  and the older spelling is to be 
			preferred."(Reaney, Withycombe, Turk).   Guppy found 
			Anthony mostly in South Wales, and in smaller number 
			in Norfolk, Derbyshire and Devon;   McLysaght in 
			Waterford since the 17th century.

In Newfoundland:	Moses Anthony, blacksmith of Kelligrews, , 
			1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory)
			Ananias Anthony, fisherman of Kelligrews,  
			1871  (Lovell's  Directory)
			Job Anthony, fisherman of Kelligrew, 
			1871  (Lovell's  Directory)  
			William Anthony, fisherman of Kellegrews, 
			1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir)	

Modern Status:		small numbers in several communities 
			in the Con. Bay and elsewhere.

BISHOP: a surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the Old English personel name Bisc (e) op, or "a nickname of one which the appearance or bearing of a bishop, or a pageant name from the custom of electing a boy-bishop on St. Nicholas's Day" (Reaney), or one who worked in the household of a bishop; in Ireland, as a synonym by translation of MacAnespie and GILLESPIE. (MacLysaght, Black, Reaney, Cottle, Turk). Guppy and Matthews found the name widespread, especially in the southwest of England. In Newfoundland: James Bishop, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Nathaniel Bishop, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: widespread
CLOONEY: a surname of Ireland, a variant of (O)Cloney, O Cluanaigh, Ir. Cluana - deceitful, flattering, rogue; and in Co. Down a variant of MacLoonie. See also CLUNEY. ( MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Wexford and Down. In Newfoundland: John Clooney, church donation report, Kelligrew, 1849 Modern status: Rare
CLUNEY: a surname of England and as Cluny or Clunie of Scotland, in England from the French place name Cluny (Saone-et-Loire), In Scotland from the Scots place name Clunie (Perthshire). There is also the possibilty of confusion with the Irish family Name CLOONEY. (Reaney, Black). Spiegelhalter traced Cluney in Devon. In Newfoundland: Jacob Cluney, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Jacob Cluney, farmer of Kelligrews, 1904 (McAlpine's Directory) Jacob Cluney, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered, especially in the Harbour Main District.
CRAIG: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland, from Middle English crag - (dweller by the) steep or precipitous rugged rock (s); also in Scotland a place name in Forfarshire (now Angus) and Perthshire; the Scots form of Cragg. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Northumberland and south of the Forth and Clyde, and by MacLysaght in Cos. Antrim, Derry and Tyrone. In Newfoundland: Thomas Craig, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Craig, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Craig, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Craig, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Craig, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: At Bell Island and St. John's
CRONIN: a surname of England and Ireland, with variants (O) Cronan in Ireland and Cronan in Scotland, from Ir. cron - brown , swarthy. (Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght, Black). Spiegelhalter tracer Cronin in Devon; MacLysaght traced (O) Cronan mainly in Co. Tipperary and (O) Cronin in Cos. Cork and Kerry. In Newfoundland: Michael Cronan, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Michael Cronan Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: At St John's and Kelligrews.
DAWE: a surname of England, either a diminutive of the baptismal name David (See Davey), or from Old English *dawe, Middle English dawe - jackdaw, ? a nickname for a petty thief, (Reaney, Cottle). Traced by Guppy in Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. In Newfoundland: Abraham Dawe, of Kelligrews, 1824 (DPHW 26B) Abraham Daw of Kelligrews, 1835 (Voter's List) Nicholas Daw, fisherman of Killigrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Abram Daw, fisherman of Killigrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Daw, fisherman of Killigrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Dawe, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Dawe, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Dawe, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Nicholas Dawe, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram Dawe, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram Dawe, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Charles Dawe, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Ambrose Dawe, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Eli Dawe, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Dawe, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread
DOMIN(E)Y: DOMINIC(K), DOMINIE, DOMINIX, variants of a surname of England from the baptismal name Dominic(k), of witch Dominey was a pet-form. "The name may have been given originally to children born on Sunday (dies dominica ) but did not come into to use as an ordinary christian name until the 13th c[entury] , in hornor of St Dominic (1170-1221), founder of the Order of Preachers." (Withycombe). Confusion with DOMIN(E)AUX etc. is possible. Guppy traced Dominy in Dorset. In Newfoundland: John Dominee, from Dorset, fisherman of Kelligrews deceased 1811 (Royal Gazette 17 Oct 1811) Modern status: Scattered.
DWYER: (O)Dwyer surnames of Ireland. ODuibhir, Ir. dubh and odhar (genitive uidhir) - dark or duncoloured. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Tipperary. In Newfoundland: Philip and Co. of Kelligrews, 1801 (CO 199.18) James Dwyer of Kelligrews, 1835 (Voters List) James Dwyer, fisherman of Killigrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Philip Dwyer, fisherman of Killigrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Philip Dwyer, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Matthew Dwyer, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Dwyer, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Patrick Dwyer, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Dwyer, widespread, especially at Bell Island (Electors 1955), Tilting and St John's; O'Dwyer, rare at St John'
FAGAN: a surname of Ireland, either of Norman origin as in the French surnames Payen and Pagan, from Latin paganus - peasant, rustic, in Cos. Dubin and Meath, or sometimes O Faodhagain in Co. Louth, though it is usually anglicized Fegan there. (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Family tradition: Sally (1808 - 68), born at Kelligrews (MUN Geog.). Modern status: Scattered, especially in the Harbour Main district.
FARRELL: a surname of England and Ireland; in England a variant of FAR(E)WELL; in Ireland (O) Farrell, Ferrall, O Fearghail - man of valour. (Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Farrell in Devon, and MacLysaght found (O) Farrell, Ferrall widespread. In Newfopundland: James Farrell of Kelligrews, 1835 (Voter's List) James Farrell, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Farrell, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William Farrell, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Farrell, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Farrell, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: scattered
FURNEAUX: a surname of England from the French place name Fourneaux. (Calvados, LaManche). - furnaces, especially intended for the Use of charcoal. (Reaney, Dauzat). Traced by Guppy in Devon. In Newfoundland: Francis F. Furneux, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: at St. John's
GILLINGHAM: a surname of England, from the English place name Gillingham (Norfolk, Dorset, Kent). (Bardsley). Traced by Guppy in Dorset. In Newfoundland: Thomas, planter of Kelligrews, 1817 (D'Alberti 27) Modern status: Widespread
GORMAN: a surname of England and Ireland, in England ? from the Old English personal name Garmund, or dweller by the gore (a triangular piece of land) as in the place names Gore Court (Kent) and Gore (Whiltshire); in Ireland for (Mac) Gorman, (O) GORMAN, Mac Gormain. MacLysaght remarks that the prefix O has been widely substituted for Mac. Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Clare and Monaghan. In Newfoundland: Elizabeth, of Kelligrews, 1820 (NFLD. Archives BRC) Modern status: Gorman, scattered. O'Gorman, rare
GREENSLADE: a surname of England and Guernsey (Channel Islands), from the English place name Greenslade (Devon), or (dweller by or in the) green valley. (Spiegelhalter, Turk). Traced by Guppy in Devon and Somerset. In Newfoundland: William Grinslate, of Kelligrews, 1837 (Nfld. Archives BRC). Modern status: In the Harbour Main district, especially at Long Pond.
GRIFFIN: a surname of Wales, England and Ireland, a pet-form of the Middle Welsh baptismal name Gruffud, " in the Welsh border countries introduced direct from Wales, in the eastern countries by the Brentons who came over with the Conqueror and were numerous there." Also in Ireland (O) Griffin, O Griobhtha, Ir. griobhtha - griffin-like. (Reaney, MacLysaght). See GRIFFITHS. Traced by Guppy in the Midlands and West, especially in Buckinghamshire and Warwickshire, and by macLysaght in Co. Clare. In Newfoundland: Thomas Griffin, fisherman of Killigrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
HARVEY: a baptismal name and surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the personal names Old French Herve, Old Breton Aeruiu, Harviu - battle worthy, introduced by the Bretons at the Norman Conquest, or occasionally from Old German Herewig - army war; in Ireland also occasionally for O hAirmheadhaigh, ? Ir. airmheadhach - having a herd of cattle, or ? Ir. airmed - a measure of grain. (Withcombe, Reaney, Black, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). See HARVIEW. Found widespread by Guppy, especially in Cornwall, Hampshire and Kent, and generally distribted (in a variety of forms) in Scotland, and by MacLysaght in Ulster, and Cos. Wexford and Galway. In Newfoundland: James Harvey, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Peter Harvey, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread
HENNESSY: a surname of Ireland, (O) Hennessy, OhAonghusa - descendant of Angus. (MacLysaght). See HINCHEY. Traced by MacLysaght in Munster. In Newfoundland: J.J.Hennessy, of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James John Hennessy, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Hennessy, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) William J. Hennessy, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
HIBBS: a surname of England from a petform of the baptismal names Isabel (Elizabeth) from the Hebrew - my God (is) satisfaction, or Ilbert from the Old German personal name Hildeberht containing the elements strife and bright. (Withcombe, Reaney). In Newfoundland: James Hibbs , of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Hibbs, of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Hibbs, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Richard Hibbs, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Nathaniel Hibbs, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Hibbs, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
HICKEY: a surname of Ireland, (O) Hickey, O hIcidhe, Ir. iceadh- healer. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Limerick, Tipperary and Clare. In Newfoundland: Patrick Hickey, school teacher of Kelligrews, 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Modern status: Widespread
HODGE: a surname of England, a pet-form of the baptismal name, Roger. "The colloquial use of Hodge to denote an agricultral labourer is an indication of the former frequency of the name." (Withycombe, Reaney). See RO(D)GERS. Traced by Guppy in Cornwall, Devon and Lancashire. In Newfoundland: James Hodge, of Kelligrews, 1832 (DPHW) James Hodge, of Kelligrews, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: Scattered
HOOKEY: a surname of England, ? a variant of Hockey, ? from an Old English personal name such as Hocca, or of Hookway, from the English place name Hookway (Devon). (Spiegelhalter). Guppy traced Hockey in Somerset and Hookway in Devon. In Newfoundland: Joseph Hookey, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: scattered
HUSSEY: a surname of England, Ireland and ? Wales, in England from Old French hosed (house) - truck-hosed, booted, or Middle English hus(e) wyf - housewife, mistress of a family, or from the French place and family name Houssay; in Ireland (O) Hussey, O hEodhusa, or a variant of de Hosey. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Somerset and Wiltshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, andby MacLysaght from de Hosey in Cos. Kerry and Meath, and from O'Hussey in Cos. Fermanagh and Tyrone. In Newfoundland: Charles, of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
JOY: a surname of England and Ireland, from the common noun joy, or from the male and female baptismal names Joie and Joia, or also in Ireland as a variant of JOYCE. (Withycombe, Reany, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Essex, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in Connacht and Cos. Kerry and Waterford. In Newfoundland : John Joy, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered.
KING: a surname of England , Scotland and Ireland, from Old English Cyng, a nickname from cyn(in)g - king, or also from cyn(in)g - king, a nickname for one of kingly appearance or qualities, of for one who had acted the part of a king in a play or pageant or had been 'king' of some festivity, or had seen service in a royal household. In Ireland, King is usually an English name, but it is also widly used as an anglicized form of several names, including CONROY, by pseudo-translation. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy found King widespread in England, especially in Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Wiltshire, and Scoland, except the North. In Newfoundland: Thomas King, of Kelligrews, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: Widespread.
LEDREW: an anglicization of the surname of France and Jersey (Channel Islands), Ledru - vigorous, lively, lady's man. (Dauzat, Turk). Drew is also found in Jersey. In Newfoundland: Isaac Ledroe, of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Ledroe, of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William LeDrew, liquors, of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Abram LeDrew, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread.
MERCER: a surname of England and Ireland, Old French merc(h)ier - merchant, especially a dealer in silks, velvets and other costly f abrics. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Kent and Lancashire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Antrim and Down and as Mercier in Co. Offaly and other midland counties. In Newfoundland: William Mercer, of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Mercer, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Mercer, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread.
MUGFORD: a surname of England from the English place name Muckford or Mogworth (formerly Moggeford) (Devon) - Mocca's ford. (Spiegelhalter, Gover). Guppy traced Mugford, Mogford in Devon. In Newfoundland: William Mugford, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Mugford, farmer of Kelligrews, 1898 (McAlpine's Directory) William Mugford, miner of Kelligrews, 1904 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: widespread
NEWELL: a surname of England and Ireland, a variant of NEVILLE or NOEL, or from the English place names Newell (Kent) or Newhall (Devon); in Ireland also (O)Newell, O Tnuthghail, Ir. tnuth-gal - envy, valour. (Reaney, Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Co. Kildare and especially in Co. Down. In Newfoundland: Abraham Newell, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
NOSEWORTHY: a surname of England from the English place name Norsworthy (Devon) - North's homestead. (Spiegelhalter, Gover). Guppy traced Nosworthy, Spiegelhalter also Norsworthy in Devon. In Newfoundland: John, of Kelligrews, 1799 (CO 199.18) Elizabeth, of Kelligrews, 1836 (DPHW 26D) Solomon Noseworthy, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread, especially at Bell Island, Lond Pond.
NUGENT: a surname of Ireland, Nuiseann,from the Norman surname de Nogent. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Cork and Westmeath. In Newfoundland: Margaret, of Kelligrews, 1818 (Nfld. Archives BRC) John (approximately 1835-87), of Kelligrews (MUN Folklore). Edward Nugent of Kelligrews, 1835 (Voter's List) Edward Nugent, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Matthew Nugent, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) E. Nugent, Sr., liquors, of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Nugent, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Michael Nugent, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Riverdale and Kelligrews.
PARMENTER: PARMITER, surnames of Englang from Old French parme(n)tier - tailor, or ? Old French parchemintier - maker or seller of parchment. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter). Guppy traced Parminter in Devon, especially in the Barnstaple district. In Newfoundland: Joseph Parmiter, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Parmenter, rare, at St. John's; Parmiter, at St. John's, Goulds, Harbour Grace and Point Leamington (Green B.)
ROACH(E): ROCHE, surnames of England, Roach of France, the Channel Islands, and Ireland, from Old French, Middle English roche - (dweller by the) rock, or from various French and Engish place names. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Dauzat). Guppy traced Roach in Cornwall and Gloucestershire; Spiegelhalter traced Roach and Roch in Devon; MacLysaght found Roche widespread in Ireland. In Newfoundland: Edward Roach, granted land between Topsail and Kelligrews, 1847 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands). Modern status: Roach, scattered, Roache, at Topsail. Roche, scattered
ROGERS: RODGERS, surnames of England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, Roger of Guernsey (Channel Islands), from the baptismal name Roger, from the Old German personal name Hrodgar, Old English Hrothgar, Old French Roger, containing the elements fame and spear. Roger, introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest, and its pet-forms and diminutives, Hodge and Dodge, have given rise to such surnames as RO(D)GER(S), DODGE, HODGE and HODGSON. In Ulster Ro(d)gers usually stood for MacRory, Mac Ruaidhri. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black, Turk). Guppy found Rogers widespread in the south Midlands, especially in Cornwall, Herefordshire and Shropshire, with Rodgers characteristic of Derbyshire, and Rodger of Scotland where the name is scattered. MacLysaght found Ro(d)gers numerous throughout Ireland, except in Munster. In Newfoundland: James Rogers, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Rodgers, scattered. Rogers, scattered
SIMMONS: SIMMON(D)(S), SYMONDS, surnames of England, SYMONS of the Channel Islands, from the Old Norse personal name Sigmundr, Old Danish Sigmund, containing the elements, victory and protector, confused with the bapyismal name Simmond (Simon). (See SIMON). (Reaney, Cottle, Turk). Of many variants, Guppy found Simmon(d)s in the south and west, with Simmons much the more frequent form, Simmonds being associated with it in Berkshire, Hampshire, Oxfordshire and Sussex, and Semmens characteristic of Cornwall. He traced Symon(d)s and Simons in the Midlands and west, with Symonds the most generally diffused, Symons being characteristic of Cornwall and Devon. Simons of Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Rutlandshire and Northamptonshire, Simon(d)s of Northamptonshire, and all three variants of Cornwall. Spiegelhalter traced Simmon(d)s, Sym(m)ons, in Devon. In Newfoundland: William Simmonds, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Simmonds, scattered. Simmon, Symonds,scattered
SNOW: a surname of England and Ireland from Old English *snaw - (one with) snow (-white hair), or born or baptized at a time of great snow. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght 73). Traced by Guppy in Devon, Essex and Straffordshire. In Newfoundland: Edward Snow, miner of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Snow, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread
STYLES: a surname of England and Ireland from Old English stigol - (dweller by the) stile, steep ascent, or ? a variant of STOYLES. (Reaney, Cottle). Guppy traced Stiles and Styles in Kent, Northamptonshire and Sussex, Spiegelhalter traced Stiles and Styles in Devon. In Newfoundland: William Styles, school teacher of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
TILLEY: a surname of England, Tilly of Ireland and France; in England from Old English tilia, Middle English tilie - tiller, fanner, or diminutive of Till (Matilda), or from the English place names Tilley (Shropshire) or Tiley (Dorset), or from the French place naime Tilly (Aube, Calvados, etc.); in Ireland a variant of (Mac) Tully, Mac an Tuile or of (O)Tally, Ó Taithligh, Ir. taithleach - peaceable. (Reaney, Spiegelhalter, Dauzat, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Tilley in Somerset and Spiegelhalter Till(e)y in Devon. In Newfoundland: George Tilly of Kelligrews, 1835 (Voter's List) Robert Tilly of Kelligrews, 1835 (Voter's List) Tilley, of Kelligrews, 1839 (DPHW 30) John Tilley, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Tilley, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Tilley, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Tilley, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Tilley,of Henry, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Wm Tilly, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Wm. Tilly, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John of Wm. Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Tilly, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Tilly, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Tilly, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Alfred Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jos of Robt Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Tilly, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Tilly, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Wm. Of George Tilly, hotel and postmaster of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Frank Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jonathan Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George B. Tilly fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John of Robt. Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Wm. James Tilly, fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Tilly, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modem status: Widespread, especially at St. John's and Kelligrews.
WALSH: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland from Old English woelisc, Middle English walsche - foreigner (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght) See also Wallace, Wallis, Welsh. Traced by Guppy in Lancashire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght as the fourth numerous of Irish surnames. In Newfoundland: John Walsh, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Philip Walsh, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Walsh, fisherman of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Walsh, Jr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Philip Walsh, hotel keeper, of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Walsh, Sr., fisherman of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread in all districts
WHITTEN: ? a variant of the surname Whitton, and formerly as Whitton of Ireland, from the English place names Whiiton in 6 counties or Whiddon (Devon), or (dweller or worker at the) white farm, or the place or farm of (an Anglo-Saxon called) White or of a family called WHITE. (Cottle, Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght 73). In Newfoundland: Josiah Whiten, miner of Kelligrews, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Josiah Whitten, hotel keeper, of Kellegrews, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered

 

 

TRANSCRIBED AND PROVIDED BY: Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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