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Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe
that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these
Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr. Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood, as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's, although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish

till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

 

 

COMMUNITY OF HORSE COVE (now ST. THOMAS);
INCLUDES:
ST THOMAS LINE; BROAD COVE
(now ST. PHILIPS) AND PARADISE.

(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

 

 

BUTLER , CLARK(E), COADY, DRUKEN, FITZGERALD, GILLARD, HICKEY, HUSSEY, JENNINGS, JONES, KING, LAURIE, LAWLOR, MANSFIELD, MCCARTHY, MITCHELL, NEARY, O'DONNELL, PERC(E)Y, PICCO(TT), POWER, QUILTY, RICHARDS, SQUIRES, STAPLETON, TAPP, TRAVERS(E), TUCKER, WARD, WHELAN

 

 
 

 

BUTLER 			a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French  bouteillier - 
			servant in charge of the wine-cellar, usually the head 
			servant. "In some early examples, an officer of high rank 
			nominally connected with the supply and importation of wine".  
			(Reany).  Later examples may be for  Bottler  -  maker 
			of (leather) bottles.   Guppy found Butler widespread. 
			Spiegelhalter traced it in Devon.   MacLysaght found it 
			widespread in all provinces except Ulster.   Black comments 
			that  Butler appears to have been ousted in Scotland by  SPENCE. 

In Newfoundland:	Samuel Butler, fisherman of Horse Cove, 
			1871 (Lovell's Directory)

Modern Status:		widespread



CLARK(E) surnames of England, Scotland and Ireland, from Old English cler(e)c Latin clericus. "The original sence was 'a man in a religious order, cleric, clergyman'. As all writing and secretarial work in the Middle Ages was done by the clregy, the term came to mean 'scholar, secretary, recorder or penman'. "As a surname, "it was particularly common for one who had taken only minor orders" (Reaney). Clark "usually stands for O'Cleary in Ireland" (MacLysaght). The forms Clark and Clarke are widespread and indiscriminate in England; Guppy found Clark dispersed over a large part of Scotland, but rare in the north; MacLysaght traced Clarke in Dublin. In Newfoundland: John Clarke, of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Clarke, farmer of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Arthur Clarke, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John F. Clarke, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Clarke, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Mark R. Clarke, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Clark, scattered. Clarke, widespread.
COADY: a variant of the surname of Ireland Cody, Mac Oda, "A Gaelic patronymic assumed by the Archdeacon famliy who are in Co. Kilkenny since the 13th century" (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Michael Coady, farmer of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
DRUKEN: a variant of the surnames of Ireland (O) Droogan, Drugan, ODruagain, (MacLysaght). " An ancient Co. Armagh Family& It is found as far west as Co. Leitrim but is nowhere numerous. "(MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: John Drogan, of Horse Cove (now St Thomas), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: especially at St Thomas.
FITZGERALD: a surname of England and Ireland, in Irish MacGerailt - son of Gerald. (Reaney, macLysaght). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and found "very numeruos" by MacLysaght. In Newfoundland: James Fitzgerald, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
GILLARD: a surname of England, pronounced with G as in gag from the Old French Guilard with G as in gem , a derivative of French Gillard, Diminutive of Gille (Giles). (Reaney, Cottle). Traced by Guppy in Devon. In Newfoundland: George Gillard, fisherman of Broad Cove (St. Philips), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: scattered
HICKEY: a surname of Ireland, (O) Hickey, O hIcidhe, Ir. iceadh- healer. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Limerick, Tipperary and Clare. In Newfoundland: Cornelius Hickey, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
HUSSEY: a surname of England, Ireland and ? Wales, in England from Old French hosed (house) - truck-hosed, booted, or Middle English hus(e) wyf - housewife, mistress of a family, or from the French place and family name Houssay; in Ireland (O) Hussey, O hEodhusa,or a variant of de Hosey. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Somerset and Wiltshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, andby MacLysaght from de Hosey in Cos. Kerry and Meath, and from O'Hussey in Cos. Fermanagh and Tyrone. In Newfoudland: John Hussey of Broad Cove (now St. Philips), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Nathaniel Hussey, of Broad Cove (now St. Philips), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
JENNINGS: a surname of England and Ireland, a diminutive of John, based on an Old French diminutive Jeanin; in Ireland also for MacSheoinin. ( Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). See JOHN. Traced by Guppy in Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Hertfordshire, Somerset, Suffolk, Surrey and Warwickshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in Cos. Galway and Mayo and in Ulster. In Newfoundland: James Jennings, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Jennings, farmer of Horse Cove, 1904 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: Scattered
JONES: a surname of England, Wales, Ireland and the Channel Islands - son of John, from the form Ioan adopted from the Authorized Version of the Bible. Cottle points out that "Anomalously, there is no J in the excellent Welsh alphabet !But Jones is notoriously the commonest surname in Wales& .." SEE JOHN. (Reaney, Cottle, Turk). Found Widespread by Guppy in England and Wales and by MacLysaght in Ireland. In Newfoundland: John Jones, fisherman of Broad Cove (St. Philips), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: widespread
KING: a surname of England , Scotland and Ireland, from Old English Cyng, a nickname from cyn(in)g - king, or also from cyn(in)g - king, a nickname for one of kingly appearance or qualities, of for one who had acted the part of a king in a play or pageant or had been 'king' of some festivity, or had seen service in a royal household. In Ireland, King is usually an English name, but it is also widly used as an anglicized form of several names, including CONROY, by pseudo-translation. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy found King widespread in England, especially in Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Wiltshire, and Scoland, except the North. In Newfoundland: Charles King, farmer of Broad Cove (St. Philips), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Henry King, fisherman of Broad Cove (St. Philips), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
LAURIE: a surname of England and Scotland, a diminutive of the baptismal name Lawrence. See LAWRENCE. Traced by Guppy in Northumberland and south of the Forth and Clyde. And by Spiegelhalter in Devon. LOWNEY? In Newfoundland: Edward Lowne, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Lowrie, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Lowrie, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Rare, at Bell Island
LAWLOR: a variant of the surnames of Ireland, (O)Lalor, Lawler, O Leathlobhair, Ir. leath - half, lobhar - sick person, leper. MacLysaght, Cottle). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Leix. In Newfoundland: Martin Lawler, fisherman of Horse Cove (now St. Thomas), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Lawler, fisherman of Horse Cove (now St Thomas), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Lawlor, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Lawlor, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Lawlor, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Martin Lawlor, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered, especially at St.Thomas
MANSFIELD: a surname of England and Ireland; in England from the Old English place name Mansfield (Nottinghamshire) - the field bt the hill called Mam - ? breast; in Ireland for de Mandeville. See MAND(E)VILLE. (Cottle, Ekwall, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Essex and Oxfordshire, and by Maclysaght in Cos. Tipperary and Waterford. In Newfoundland: Michael Mansfield, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
MCCARTHY: a surname of Ireland, Mac Carthaigh , Ir, carthach - loving. "The most numerous Mac name in Ireland". (MacLysaght.) Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Cork and Kerry. In Newfoundland: Richard McCarthy, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William McCarthy, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: widespread
MITCHELL: a surname of England, Scotland, Ireland, the Channel Islands and of the Micmacs of Newfoundland, from the baptismal name Michael (See MICHAEL(S), or from Old English mycel, Middle English michel etc. - big; also in Connacht often a synonym of (O) Mulvihill) O Maoilmhichil - devotee of (Saint) Michael. (Reaney, MacLysaght, Turk). Found widespread by Guppy in England and Scotland as far north as Aberdeen and by MacLysaght in all provinces except Munster. In Newfoundland: James Mitchell, fisherman of Broad Cove (St. Philips), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
NEARY: a surname of Ireland, (O)Neary, O Nardhaigh, possibly from nardach - skilful. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in north Connacht. In Newfoundland: Philip Neary, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Neary, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status:` Scattered, especially at Bell Island and St. John's.
O'DONNELL: a surname of Ireland, O Domhnaill. (MacLysaght). See O'Donald. Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Clare. Donegal and Galway. In Newfoundland: Michael O'Donnell alias Michael Clarke, from Modiling ( CO. Waterford), of Paradise (unspecified), died 1816 (Royal Gazzett 16 Jul 1816). Modern status: Scattered.
PERC(E)Y: surnames of England, PERCY of Scotland from the French place name Percy (La Manche, Calvados), or ? a variant of PEARC(E)Y. (Reaney, Cottle). Spiegelhalter traced Pearcy in Devon. In Newfoundland: Caroline Percy, scool teacher of Horse Cove (now St. Thomas), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status:
PICCO(TT): variants of Picot, a surname of England and the Channel Islands? From Old French personal name PIC with the Suffix -OT or ? from a nickname from Old French PICOT - point, pointed object, Picaud, a pejorative form of Piqueur - user of a pickaxe. (Reaney, Dauzat, Turk). See also PICKETT. In Newfoundland: Thomas Picco, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Picco - scattered; Piccott - scattered
POWER: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French Pohier - the man from Poix (Picardy), or from Old French povre, poure - poor, or ? from Old French poer - one (em)power(ed) to do something, a herald. MacLysaght notes that the de in the Irish form de Paor should be le, - the poor man, consequent on a vow, POWERS - son of Power appears to be rare. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy traced the variant Poore in Hampshire; Spiegelhalter traced Poore and Power in Devon; MacLysaght traced Power mainly in Waterford and adaccent counties, among the fifty most numerous Irish names. In Newfoundland: James Power, of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Power widespread, Powers rare, Poor rare
QUILTY: a surname of Ireland (O) Quilty, O Caoile. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght mainly in Munster and especially in Co. Limerick. In Newfoundland: Family tradition: ------, from Ireland, settled at Bishop's Cove (Conception B.), in the 1700s; the family later move to St. Thomas (Harbour Main district) (MUN Hist.) Nicholas Quilty, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Quilty, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Michael Quilty, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered, including St. Thomas
RICHARDS: a surname of England, Wales and Guerney (Channel Islands), Richard of Jersey, from the Old German personal name Ric(h)ard, Central French Richard, Anglo Norman Reiard, containing the elements powerful and brave. With its nicknames and diminutives, such as Rich(ie), Hitch, Rick(et), Hick(et), Dick(on), it has given rise, as Withycombe comments, to an immence number of surnames including DICK(S), DICK(IN)SON, DIXON, HICKMAN, HICKS, HIGDEN, HISCOCK, HITCHENS, HUDDY, HUDSON, PRITCHARD. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, Turk). Found widespread by Guupy in the Midlands, north and south Wales, and especially in Cornwall and Monmouthshire. In Newfoundland: William Richard, of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Richards, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Richards, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Michael Richards, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: Scattered
SQUIRE(S): surnames of England from Old French escuyer, Middle English squyer - shield-bearer, esquier, a young gentelmen attending a knight. (Reaney, Cottle). See also SWYERS. Traced by Guppy in Bedfordshire, Devon, Leicestershire, Ruthlandshire and Nottinghamshire, with Squires "far the least frequent, occurring in Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire." In Newfoundland: John, of Southside Broad Cove (now St. Philips), 1790 (CO 199.18) Benjamin Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Benjamin Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Benjamin Squires, farmer of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Squires, farmer of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Frederick Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Jacob Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Squires, farmer of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Levi Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Squires, farmer of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Squires, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Squires, widespread.
STAPLETON: a surname of England and Ireland, from the English place name Stapleton (in 7 countries) - farm by a pillar or post or ? Stapledon (Devon). See also GAUL(E), Mac an Ghaill - son of the foreigner, adopted some Stapletons. (Cottle, MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght mainly in Cos. Kilkenny and Tipperary. In Newfoundland: Family tradition, William (1797- ), from England or Ireland, came to St. John's in 1813 and settled at Horse Cove (now St. Thomas, Conception B.) in 1817 (MUN Geog.) Edward Stapleton, fisherman of Horse Cove, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Stapleton, fisherman of Horse Cove, Harbour Main District, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Stapleton, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Stapleton, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Stapleton, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Richard J. Stapleton, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Edward Stapleton, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Terence Stapleton, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered, especially at St. Thomas
TAPP: a surname of England from the Old English personal name *Txppa, unrecorded but found in such place names as Taplow (Buckinghamshire), Tapton (Derbyshire), etc, (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Devon and Somerset. In Newfoundland: Benjamin Tapp, farmer of Broad Cove (now St. Philips) 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Tapp, farmer of Broad Cove (now St. Philips) 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
TRAVERS(E): surnames of England and Ireland; from Middle English travers, used of a toll paid on passing the boundary of a town or lordship, or a tollgate or tollbridge, and hence perhaps the surname of the keeper and collector of such tolls; in Ireland also for (O) Trower, O Treabhair, Ir. treabhair - skilfull. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Travis in Derbyshire, Lancashire and with Traves, in Lincolnshire; Spiegelhalter traced Travers in Devon; and MacLysaght Travers in Co. Leitrim. Traverse may be a Newfoundland variant. In Newfoundland: Richard Travers, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Travers, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Richard Travers, Sr., fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Richard Travers, Jr., fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Patrick Travers, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Travers, scattered. Traverse, scattered.
TUCKER: a surname of England and Ireland from Old English tucian - to torment, later to tuck or full (cloth), associated with FULLER and WALKER, or rarely from French tout coeur - brave, courageous; in Ireland also sometimes a synonym of O'Tougher (See TOYCHER). (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy especially in Devon and also Cornwall, Dorset, Hampshire, Monmouthshire, Somerset and South Wales. In Newfoundland: R., of Broad Cove (now St. Phillips), 1765 (CO 199.18) Emmanuel Tucker, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Charles Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Elias Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Henry Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Jacob Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Jonathan Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Nathaniel Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Nathaniel Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Richard Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Richard Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Tucker, fisherman of Broad Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
WARD: a surname of England and Ireland from Old English weard -watchman, guard, or Middle English werd, ward - (dweller in or near the) marsh, or from the English place name Ward (Devon); in Ireland usually for Mac an Bhaird - son of the bard. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Found widespread by Guppy and bybMacLysaght in Cos. Donegal and Galway. In Newfoundland: Henry S. Ward, fisherman of Broad Cove (St. Philips), 1871 Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
WHELAN: a surname of Ireland, with a variant WHALEN, (O) Whelan, Ó Faoldin, Ir. faol - wolf, a variant of PHELAN, or sometimes an abbreviation of Whelehan, or occasionally a synonym of Hyland. Whalen is recorded by E.C. Smith but not by MacLysaght. MacLysaght found Whelan numerous in the country between Cos. Wexford, Tipperary and Wexford, and rare in Ulster. In Newfoundland: John Whelan, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Whelan, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Richard Whelan, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Whelan, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Whelan, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Daniel Whelan, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Whelan, fisherman of Horse Cove, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Whalen, widespread, especially at St. John's, Whelan, widespread, especially at St. John's, Colliers and Bauline.

 

 

TRANSCRIBED AND PROVIDED BY: Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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