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Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe
that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these
Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood
and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr.
Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood,
as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's,
although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match
for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The
people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish
till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

Any questions or comments, or to report any errors, please contact me by using the "contact" button below.

COMMUNITY OF COLLIERS:


(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

 

 

BENNETT , BISHOP, BREEN, BRIAN, BUCK, BURK, COLE, CONWAY, COSTIGAN CULLEN, 
DOYLE, DRISCOLL, DYER, FLYNN, FOLEY, GHANEY, GRACE, GRIFFIN, GUINEY, 
HEARN, HEDDERSON, HINES, HUNT, KEEFE, KEHOE, LANDRIGAN, LEE, M(a)CDONALD, 
M(a)CDOUGAL, MALONEY, MCGRATH, MAHANEY, MERRIGAN,  MURPHY, 
NORTHCOTT, PHELAN, PHILIPS, POTTLE, POWELL, RAYMOND, RYAN, SANDERS,
 SCANLON, SHEA, SKANES, SKEHANS, WALL, WALSH, WELLS, WHELAN

 

 
 

 

BENNETT: a surname of England, Ireland, Scotland,
Bennet of Jersey (Channel Islands),
		from the Old French  Beneit,  Bebeoit, Latin  Benedictus - blessed, " a common 
		christian name from the 12th century."  (Reaney,  Turk)   Guppy found Bennett
		widespread in England (with Bennetts in Cornwall).   Bennet is the common form 
		in Scotland (Black) and in the north of England (Cottle).   In Ireland,  
		Bennett has been prominent in Kilkenny and adjacent countries since the 
		14th century.

		In Newfoundland:	Stephen Bennett, of Colliers,  1798  (CO 199.18)
					
		Modern Status:		widespread


BISHOP:		a surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the Old 
		English personel name  Bisc (e) op, or "a nickname of one which the appearance 
		or bearing of a bishop, or a pageant name from the custom of electing a 
		boy-bishop on St. Nicholas's Day"  (Reaney), or one who worked in the 
		household of a bishop; in Ireland, as a synonym by translation of  MacAnespie 
		and GILLESPIE. (MacLysaght,  Black,  Reaney,  Cottle,  Turk).   Guppy and 
		Matthews found the name widespread, especially in the southwest of England.

		In Newfoundland:	Family tradition - Chris Bishop,  from Colliers, 
					of Coley's Point, about 1863,  (MUN Hist.).

		Modern Status:		widespread


BREEN:		a surname of Ireland,  O'  Braoin.  See also  BREWIN.   (MacLysaght).  
		Traced by MacLysaght in Cos.  Offaly and  Roscommon.

		In Newfoundland:	George Breen, farmer, of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Breen, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Driectory)
					John Breen, laborer of Colliers, 
					1898 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern Status:		scattered	


BRIAN:		(O) BRIEN, BRYAN (T),  surnames, in one or more of the preceding variants, 
		of England, Scotland, Ireland and France, from a Breton personal name 
		containing the element  bri - height, dignity, esteem  (Dauzat, Black),  
		or  from a " Keltic (Old Welsh/Irish) name containing the element  
		bre  -  hill"  (Cottle),  of simular form and significance.  See also BRYNE. 
		(MacLysaght,  Reaney).   As a baptismal name  "Brian or  Bryan has from 
		early times been a favourite in Ireland on account of the national hero  
		Brian  Boroimhe; but it was, during the Middle Ages, equally popular in 
		England...[when] for several centuries it was a favourite, as the many 
		commom surnames derived from it testlfy....it survived in Yorks [hire] 
		Westmoreland, Cheshire, Lanc [ashire] until the 18th century, but gradually 
		fell into disuse and came to be regarded as as exclusively Irish name.  
		It is still used in Brittany and has come back into use in England durin 
		the present century" (Withycomb).  As a family name in England, Reaney, 
		who gives twelve variants, maintains that in the south it is a Breton 
		personal name introduced by the Normans, and, according to Black, "by 
		Bretons who among the Normans in the invasion of England", but in the north 
		"it is O[ld] Ir [ish]Brian,  bought by Norsemen from Iceland...to Cumberland 
		and across the Pennines into Yorkshire."    In Scotland, Black cites the 
		forms Brian, Brien and Bryan, ans ascribes the Breton origin to them, as 
		does Dauzat, Briant, Briend.   In Ireland,  MacLysaght sees the family O'Brien,
		O'Briain "deriving from the famiy of King Brian Boru", but notices that 
		O'Brien may also be a synonym of O'Bryne (SEE BRYNE), of Bryan, and of 
		MacBryan,  Mac Braoin.   Guppy traced Bryan widespread, especially in 
		Leicestershire and Rutlandshire and Oxford-shire,   Bryant especially in 
		Somerset and Wiltshire. Spiegalehalter traced Brian, Bryan (t) in Devon.  
		Matthews traced Brien, Bryan in Ireland, Devon and Dorset.  Briant and 
		Bryant in  Devon. MacLysaght found O'Brien "now very numerous in other 
		provinces as well as Munster, being the fifth most numerous name in Ireland", 
		Bryan " The name of a prominent Anglo-Norman family settled in Co. Kilkenny",  
		and MacBryan, sometimes changed to O'Brien in Cos.  Fermanagh and Cavan.

		In Newfoundland:	
					Catherine Bryan, of Colliers,  1793  (CO 199.18)
					Peter Bryan, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					James Bryan, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					John Brine, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					George Bryan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John Bryan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James Bryan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Peter Bryan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
						
		Modern Status:		O'Brien - widespread especially at Bell Island and Topsail


BUCK:		a surname of England and Scotland, from Old English  bucca - he-goat or  
		bucc - stag, a nickname, or for a dealer in vension or a goat-herd, or 
		from Old English  boc - (dweller by the) beachtree  (Reaney,  Cottle,  Black).
		Traced by Guppy in Norfolk, Suffolk,  and Nottinghamshire;  by  Speigelhalter 
		in  Devon and by  Matthews also in  Dorset.

		In Newfoundland:	Patrick Buck, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)

		Modern Status:		rare at Conception Harbour


BURK(E): 	De B (O) urke,  surnames of Ireland,  BURKE of the MicMacs of Newfoundland, 
		from the English place name Burgh in several countries - fort, manor, hill 
		mound, in Ireland since the 12th century.  (Reaney,  MacLysaght).   
		MacLysaght found the names numerous in all provinces, but least in Ulster.

		In Newfoundland:	Patt Burk, of  Colliers,  1811  (NF Archives BRC)
					William Burke of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					William Bourke, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					William Bourke, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					James Burke, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Patrick Burke, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					William Burke, Sr, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William Burke, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James Burke, Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James Burke, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick Burke, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Burke, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William of Patrick Burke, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern Status:		Burke - widespread;  
					Burk at Stephenville;  
					DeBourke/Deburke at St. John's


COLE:		surnames of England, Cole of Ireland and Coles of Scotland, from the Old 
		English personal name Cola, from Old English col - coal, that is, dark, 
		swarthy, or a diminutive of Nicholas, or from Old English *coll - (dweller 
		on the) hill; also in Ireland for (Mac) Cool, Mac  (Giolla) Comhghaill - 
		devotee of  St. Comhghal; also in Scotland for MacDowall, Gealic  
		Mac Dhughaill - son of Dougal, The black  stranger, the Dane. See Cool (E). 
		(Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black). Guppy found Cole and Coles widespread,
		with Coles especially in Somerset, Dorset and Devon. Black found Coles 
		in Glasgow, and MacLysaght Cole in Co. Donegal.

		In Newfoundland:	John Cole, of Colliers, 1778 (CO 199.18) 
					William Cole, of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					Michael Cole, of  Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					John Cole Senior of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					John Cole Junior of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					James Cole, of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					Thomas Cole, of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					James Cole, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					James Cole, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Cole, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Moses Cole, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Thomas Cole, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Thomas Cole, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					William Cole, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)

		Modern status: 		Cole widespread, 
					Coles, scattered . 
					Cole widespead in 1871 (Lovell's Directory)	


CONWAY:		a surname of England and Ireland;  in England from the Welsh place name 
		Conway, "one of the few Welsh towns that have Originated a surname".  
		(Barsley);  In Ireland, the anglicized form of several Gaelic surnames,  
		Mac  Connmhaigh,  Ir.  Condmach Head smashing,  Mac  Conmidhe - hound 
		of Meath,  O' Conbhiudhe,  Ir.  Con - hound  and  buidhe - yellow, and  
		O' Connmhachain   (Bardsley,  Cottle,  MacLysaght).   Traced by MacLysaght 
		in Cos. Clare,  Tyrone,  Sligo  and  Mayo.


		In Newfoundland:	John Conway, of Colliers, (1835 Voters List )
					Philip Conway, of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					Dennis and others, of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory) 
					Dennis Conway, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Edward Conway, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Patrick Conway, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Richard Conway, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Thomas Conway, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Nicholas Conway, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Timothy Conway, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Peter Conway, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James of Patk Conway, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Richard Conway, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John of Rich Conway, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Michael Conway, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern Status:		widespread, especially at Colliers, St. John's 
					and St. Bride's	


COSTIGAN:	a surname of Ireland, MacOisigin "and corruptly Mac Costagian. Woulfe 
		says Oistigin comes from the English name Roger, pet from  Hodgkin" 
		(MacLysaght, Withycombe). See Hodge. Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Leix.

		In Newfoundland:	William Costigan, of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					John Costigan, planter of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					William Costigan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John of Wm. Costigan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John of John Costigan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Costigan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William Costigan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John of Wm Costigan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status: 	Scattered, especially at Logy Bay and Harbour Main.	


CULLEN:		a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland, in England from the German 
		place name Koln - (the man from) Cologne; in Scotland from the Scots 
		place name Cullen (Banffshire) and in Ayrshire and Galloway;  ?  also 
		for the surname of Ireland (Mac) Cullen, MacCuilinn and (O)Cullen, 
		O Cuilinn, Ir. cuileann - holly, both variants of "other somewhat 
		similar names" (MacLysaght). (Reaney, Black, MacLysaght). Traced by 
		Guppy in Nottinghamshire and Somerset, by Spiegelhalter in Devon; by 
		Black in Ayrshire and Galloway and other parts of Scotland; by MacLysaght: 
		(Mac)Cullen in Co. Monaghan,  (O) Cullen in Co. Kildare.

		In Newfoundland:	Mary Cullin, of Colliers, 1778 (CO 199.18)

		Modern status:		Scattered


DOYLE:		a surname of Ireland, (O) Doyle, O  Dubhghaill, Ir. dubh - black, 
		gall - foreigner, of Norse origin.  (Reaney, MacLysaght). MacLysaght 
		describes  (O) Doyle as one of the most numerous nams in Leinster,

		In Newfoundland: 	Patrick Doyle, of Colliers, (1835 Voters List)
					Patrick Doyle, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory
					Patrick Doyle, Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick Doyle, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Widespread, especially in Avondale, 
					Widespread in 1871 (Lovell's Directory)



DRISCOLL:	(O)Driscoll, surnames of Ireland,O hEidersceoil, Ir.eidirsceol - 
		intermediary, interpreter, later O Drisceoil. (MacLysaght, Cottle). 
		"The name is very numerous in Co. Cork but not elsewhere." (MacLysaght).

		In Newfoundland:	Thomas Driscoll, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Driscoll, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1898 (McAlpine's Directory)
			
		Modern status:		Scattered



DYER:		a surname of England, Ireland, Scotland and of Guernsey (Channel Island); 
		in all four from Old English deagere - dyer, in Ireland also for Mac D(w)yer, 
		Mac Duibhir, cogate with Diver. (Reaney, MacLysaght, Black, Turk). Traced 
		by Guppy in Cornwall, Devon, Somerset and Suffolk; by MacLysaght in Cos. 
		Sligo and Roscommon.

		In Newfoundland:	John, of Colliers, 1798 (CO 199.18)

		Modern status:		Scattered	


FLYNN:		(O) FLYNN, surnames of Ireland, also Flinn, Flyng, O Floinn, Ir. flann - ruddy. 
		(MacLysaght). MacLysaght found the names "numerous and widespread."

		In Newfoundland: 	Robert Fling, of Colliers, 1802 (CO 199.18).
					Robert Flynn, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					Daniel Flynn, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Robert Flynn, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William Flynn, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Flynn, widespread, O'Flynn rare.

FOLEY:		a surname of England, Ireland and Guernsey (Channel Island); in England 
		and Guernsey, ? a variant of FOLLETT; in Ireland (O) Foley, O Foghladha, 
		Ir. foghlaidhe - plunderer, though in Co. Roscommon a synonym of Mac Sharry, 
		MacSearraigh, from searrach - foal. MacLysaght states that "The distinguished 
		English family of Foley is said to be of Irish origin," but Cottle suggests 
		that the Worchestershire family has probably anouther origin. (MacLysaght, 
		Cottle, Bardsley, Turk). See also FOWLER. Traced by MacLysaght in the South 
		Munster and Co. Roscommon, by Cottle and Bardsley in Worchestershire and 
		neighbouring counties, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. 

		In Newfoundland:	Patrick Foley married at Hr. Main parish, Jan 1877
					Patrick Foley, labour of Colliers, 
					1898 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Richard Foley, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1904  (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick Foley, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1904  (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Widespread.


GHANEY:		a Newfoundland variant of the surname of Ireland, (O) Geaney, O Geibheannaigh, 
		Ir.  geibheannach - fettered. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Cork.

		In Newfoundland:	Samuel Gauney, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					John Gauney, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					Benjamin Gahany, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Gahany, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Patrick Gahany, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					William Gahany, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
		All the above plus more on 1894-97 as follows:	
					Edward Gahaney, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Gahaney, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Michael Gahaney Jr.,  fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Nicholas Gahaney, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Samuel Gahaney, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Michael Gahaney, Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Benjamin Gahaney, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Scattered, especially at Colliers.


GRACE:		a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French, gras - fat, or from 
		Old French, Middle English grace - a pleasing quality, hence attractive, 
		charming, or from Old English grxs - grass, pasture, hence a grazier, of 
		from a personal name from Old German gresja - gray, latinized as Gratia 
		and associated with Old French grace. (Reaney, Cottle). Traced by Guppy in 
		Buckinghamshire and Lancashire, by Spiegelgalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght 
		in Co. Kilkenny.

		In Newfoundland:	Edmund Grace, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					Edmond Grace, farmer of Colliers, White, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Grace, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Patrick Grace, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Edward Grace, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Scattered.


GRIFFIN:	a surname of Wales, England and Ireland, a pet-form of the Middle Welsh 
		baptismal name Gruffud, " in the Welsh border countries introduced direct 
		from Wales, in the eastern countries by the Brentons who came over with the 
		Conqueror and were numerous there." Also in Ireland (O) Griffin, O Griobhtha, 
		Ir. griobhtha - griffin-like. (Reaney, MacLysaght). See GRIFFITHS. Traced 
		by Guppy in the Midlands and West, especially in Buckinghamshire and 
		Warwickshire, and by macLysaght in Co. Clare.

		In Newfoundland:	John, of Colliers, 1871 ( Lovell's Directory)	
					John Griffin, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Griffin Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John Griffin, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James Griffin, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Widespread	


GUINEY:		a surname of Ireland, (O) Guiney, O Guinidhe. (MacLysaght). Traced by 
		MacLysaght mainly in Cos. Kerry and Cork. (SEE ALSO GHANEY)

		In Newfoundland: 	

		Early instance: 	Samuel ? Guaney, of Colliers, 1800 (CO 199.18).

		Modern status:		In the Ferryland district.


HEARN:		a variant of the surname of England, Hern(e) etc., Hearne in Ireland, 
		from the English place name Herne (Kent, Bedfordshire), Hirn (Hampshire), 
		Hearn Farm (Devon), or from Old English hyrne - (dweller in the) nook or 
		corner of land or in a bend; in Ireland also a variant of Ahearne in Co. 
		Waterford (See AHEARN. (Reaney, Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght). Guppy traced 
		Hearn in Devon and Essex, Hern(e) in Devon and Norfolk.

		In Newfoundland:	James Hearn, of Colliers, 1798 (CO 199.18 )
					James Herron Senior, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					James Herron Junior, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					Daniel Hearn, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					James Hearn, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					James Hearn, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					James Hearn, school teacher of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Hearn, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Michael Hearn, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Patrick Hearn, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
		All the above plus more on 1894-97 as follows:	
					Thomas Hearn, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Martin Hearn, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William Hearn, Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William Hearn, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John Of Mich'l Hearn, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Richard Hearn, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Jas of Mich'l Hearn, planter & gen. Dealer of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		scattered


HEDDERSON:	a variant, apparently not recorded elsewhere, of ? EDISON/EDDERSON

		In Newfoundland: 	James Edderson, of Colliers, 1768 (CO 199.18)
					Philip Hedderson, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Philip Hedderson, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1898 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Philip Eddison, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1904 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		At White Bay and St. John's


HINES:		HYNES, surnames of England and Ireland; in England from Middle English 
		hine - servant; in Ireland for (O)Heyne, O hEidhin, ? Ir. eidhean - ivy. 
		(Reaney, MacLysaght). See HINDS. Hine traced by Guppy in Devon and 
		Staffordshire; Hine(s), Hyne(s) by MacLysaght in Co. Galway.

		In Newfoundland:	John Hynes, of Colliers 1813 (Nfld. Archives BRC)
			
		Modern status:		Hines, rare.  Hynes, widespread	


HUNT:		a surname of England and Ireland, Old English hunta - hunter; in Ireland, 
		except Ulster, also by pseudo-translation for several Irish names such as 
		Feighney, Feighrey and Fey. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Found widespread 
		by Guppy, especiaslly in the south and Midlands, and by MacLysaght in all 
		provinces, least in Ulster and most in Connacht.

		In Newfoundland:	John and Bridget, from Ireland, settled at Holyrood 
					and subsequently at Colliers (MUN Folklore).
					John Hunt, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)			

		Modern status:		Widespread.


KEEFE:		(O)KEEFE variants of the surname of Ireland, (O) Keefe, O Caoimh, Ir. 
		caomh - gentle. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in south Munster,

		In Newfoundland:	Thomas Keef, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)

		Modern status:		scattered. O'Keefe, widespread


KEHOE:		a surname of England and Ireland, with variants KEO(U)GH also of Ireland; 
		in England "from Caieu, a lost town in the vicinity of Boulongne-sur-Mer 
		(Pas-de-Calais)," in Ireland for (Mac)Keogh, MacEochaidh, (Reaney, 
		MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced (Mac) Keogh in Cos. Limerick, Tipperary, 
		Roscommon, Wexford, and usually Kehoe in wicklow. Keough is the Midland form.

		In Newfoundland:	John Kehoe, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)

		Modern status: 		Kehoe, scattered, Keough, widespread


LANDRIGAN:	LUNDRIGAN, variants of the surnames of Ireland, (O) Lonergan, Londrigan, 
		O Longargain. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Tipperary.

		In Newfoundland:	Simon Londrigan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)	

		Modern status: 		Landrigan, rare. Lundrigan, widespread.


LEE:		a surname of England, Ireland and the Channel Islands, one of several variant 
		forns derived from common English place names, Lea, Lee, Leigh, Lye, of from 
		Old English leah - (dweller by the) wood, clearing; in Ireland also for 
		Mac Laoidhigh, Ir. laoidheach - peotic, or Mac an Leagha - son of the 
		physician. (reaney, MacLysaght, Turk). Found widespread by Guppy in England 
		and by MacLysaght in Ireland.

		In Newfoundland: 	John, of Colliers, 1781 (CO 199.18).

		Modern status:		Widespread.


M(a)CDONALD:	surnames of Scotland and Ireland and of the Micmacs of Newfoundland, 
		Mac Dhomhnuill - son of Donald, from primitive Celtic *Dubno-walos containing 
		the elements world and mighty, in Old Irish Domnall, in Gaelic Domhnall, 
		Black comments: "Property speaking there is no such surname as Macdonald. 
		MacDhomhnuill means 'son of (a particular) Donald': all other of the name 
		are simply Domhnullach, 'one of the Donalds'."But, as Cottle remarks, "be 
		that as it may, it was the second commonest surname (after SMITH) in Scotland 
		in 1858, dropping to third (after SMITH and BROWN) by 1958& " In Ireland, 
		sometimes a synonym of the Irish MacDONNELL. (Withycombe, Black, Cottle, 
		MacLysaght). See O'DONALD. Traced by Guppy in Inverness-shire.

		In Newfoundland:	Michael McDonald, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas McDonald, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William McDonald, Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William McDonald, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Widespread, especially at Colliers.


M(a)CDOUGAL: (L):	a surname of Scotland with several variants, MacDhughaill- 
		son of Dougal, from "Old Irish dubhgall 'black stranger' a name originally 
		given by the Irish to the Norwegians, which later became a common christian 
		name. It is now chiefly used in the Highlands of Scotland. The word dubhgall 
		is still used in Irish and Gaelic to indicate an Englishman and in Modern 
		Breton for a Frenchman." (Withycombe). Traced by Guppy in Argyllishire.

		In Newfoundland:	Michael MacDougall, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)

		Modern status:		MacDougall, McDougal, McDougall, scattered.


MALONEY:	a variant of surname of Ireland (O) Moloney, O Maoldhomhnaigh - servant 
		of the Church. "In Co. Tipperary Maloughgney has become Molony in some cases; 
		there too the Mulumby family&  has been changed to Moloney." (O) MULLOWNEY 
		is the Connacht form of (O) Moloney. (MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced 
		(O) Moloney in Cos. Clare and Tipperary.

		In Newfoundland:	Maurice Maloney, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Widespread, especially at Holyrood.


MCGRATH:	a surname of Ireland MacGraith, the Irish equivalent of the surname of 
		Scotland McCRAE. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLsaght in Cos. Clare, Donegal, 
		Fermanagh and Waterford.

		In Newfoundland:	John MacGrath, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					Thomas MacGrath, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					John McGrath, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Patrick McGrath, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Thomas McGrath, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Timothy McGrath, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
		All the above plus more in 1894-97 as follows:	
					Wm. McGrath, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Edward McGrath, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John of Thos McGrath, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thos of John McGrath, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick of John McGrath, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William McGrath, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John McGrath, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thos of Thos McGrath, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James of Timothy McGrath, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Widespread.


MAHANEY:	MEHANEY, ? Newfoundland variants of the surname of Ireland MAHONEY. 

		In Newfoundland:	David, of Colliers, 1798 (CO 199.18)

		Modern status:		Mahaney and Mehaney, scattered.


MERRIGAN:	a surname of Ireland, (O) Merrigan, O Muireagain, ? a dimnutive of a 
		name beginning with Muir. (MacLysaght). See also MORGAN. Traced by 
		MacLysaght originally in Cos. Longford and Westmeath, now scattered.

		In Newfoundland: 	Edmund Merrigan, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					Edmond Merigan, of Colliers, 1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Merigan, of Colliers, 1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Micheal Merigan, of Colliers, 1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Thomas Merigan, of Colliers, 1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					William Merrigan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Merrigan, Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Merrigan, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Edward Merrigan, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status: 		Scattered.


MURPHY:	a surname of Ireland and Scotland, (O) Murphy, O Murchadha, Ir. 
		murchadh - sea-warrior, or Mac Murphy, Mac Murchada. MacLysaght notes 
		that the "resumption of the prefixes O and Mac, which is a modern tendency 
		with most Gaelic names, has not taken place in the case of Murphy, " that 
		the majority of the Murphys in Ulster were probably oringinally Mac Murphy, 
		and that Murphy is the most common name in Ireland. It occurs in Scotland 
		from Irish immigration. (MacLysaght, Cottle).

		In Newfoundland:	Maurice, of Colliers, 1799 (CO 199.18)
					Bryan Murphy, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					Thomas Murphy, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					John Murphy, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					John Murhpy, of Colliers, 1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Thomas Murphy, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John Murphy Sr.,  fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Timothy Murphy, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John of Tim Murphy, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James Murphy, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Samuel Murphy Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Samuel Murphy Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John of Sam'l Murphy, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Widespread

NORTHCOTT:	a surname of England from the English place names Northcott of Northcote 
		(Devon) or Norcott (Hertfordshire), or (Dweller in the) cottage to the north. 
		(Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Cornwall and Devon.

		In Newfoundland:	Mary Narrowcott, of Colliers, 1781 (CO 199.18)

		Modern status:		Scattered.


PHELAN:		a surname of Ireland (O) Phelen, O Faolain, Ir. faol - wolf. (MacLysaght). 
		Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Kilkenny and Waterford.

		In Newfoundland: 	Matthew Phelan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Thomas Phelan, farmer opf Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)

		Modern status:		At St. John's


PHILIPS:	a surname of England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and Guerney (Channel Islands) 
		from the baptismal name Philip, Latin Philippue from the Greek - horse-lover, 
		after the aposte, common in England in the Middle Ages and the origin of 
		many surnames such as Philip(s), Phelps, PHILPOTT, PHIPPARD. In Ireland in 
		modern times Phillips has to some extent superseded (Mac) Philbin, 
		MacPhilbin - little Philip. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). 
		Traced by Guppy in the Midlands in the south and west of England, especially 
		in Monmouthshire, in South Wales and Scotland, and by MacLysaght in Cos. 
		Galway and Mayo.

		In Newfoundland:	John Philips, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					George, fisherman of Colliers, 1852 (DPHW 34)
					George Philips, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Job Philips, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Philips, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Philips, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Edward Philips, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Philips, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick Philips, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Scattered


POTTLE:		a surname of England a diminutive of pot from philipot - little Philip, 
		or a variant of POTTER, or ? from Old French potol - post, stake, perhaps 
		applied to a lean, tall man. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter). See PHILLIPS, 
		PHILPOT(T), POTTER, POTTS. Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon.

		In Newfoundland:	John, fisherman of Colliers, 1834 (DPHW 34)

		Modern status:		Scattered	


POWELL:		a surname of England, Wales, Ireland and the Channel Islands, a shortened 
		form of the Welsh hywel - eminent (See Howell), or a Variant of PAUL, or of 
		POOLE;  in Ireland also an occasional synonym of GUILFOYLE.  (Withycombe, 
		Reaney, Cottle, Turk, MacLysaght). Found widespread by Guppy in the south 
		and west of England, especially in Herefordshire and Monmouthshire And in 
		the South Wales, and by McLysaght in small numbers in all provinces.

		In Newfoundland:	Thomas Powell, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)


		Modern status:		scattered


RAYMOND:	a baptismal name and surname of England and Ireland, from an Old German 
		personal name Raginmund, Old French Raimund or Reimund, containing the 
		elements counsel or might and protection; in Ireland a variant of REDMOND. 
		(Withycombe, Reaney, MacLysaght). See also REMO. Guppy traced Raymo(u)nt, 
		Spiegelhalter Rayment, Raymond, Raymont in Devon; MacLysaght traced Raymond 
		manily in Cos. Cork and Kerry.

		In Newfoundland: 	Thomas Raymon, of Colliers, 1791 (CO199.18)

		Modern status:		Scattered


RYAN:		a surname of Ireland (O)Ryan, O Maoilriain now abbreviated to Oriain, "from 
		an old personal name of obscure meaning." (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght 
		especially in Co. Tipperary.

		In Newfoundland:	Edward, granted land at Colliers, 1852 (Nfld. Archives, 
					Registry Crown Lands)
					John, granted land at Colliers, 
					1852 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands)
					Edmond Ryan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Edmond Ryan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Michael Ryan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Edward Ryan, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick Ryan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Michael Ryan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John Ryan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick Ryan, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Edward Ryan, Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Widespread, throughout all districts.


SANDERS:	SAUNDERS, surnames of England, Scotland and Ireland, Saunders of 
		Guernsey (Channel Islands) - son of Sa(u)nder, a pet-form of Alexander 
		(See ALEXANDER). (Turk). Found widespread by Guppy in the Midlands and 
		south, especially in Devon, with both forms often associated, Sanders 
		being most frequent in Devon and Worcestershire and Oxfordshire. Traced 
		by MacLysaght in Ulster.

		In Newfoundland:	------- Saunders, on the Tyro in the seal fishery 
					out of Colliers, 1838 (Newfoundlander 29 Mar 1838)

		Modern status:		Sanders, rare. Saunders, widespread.


SCANLON:	a variant of the surnames of Ireland (Mac) amd (O) Scanlan, Mac Scannlain, 
		O Scannlain, or a variant in Co. Sligo of (O) Scannell, O Scannail all from 
		Ir. scannal - contention. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Clare, 
		Sligo, Cork, Fermanagh and Galway. 

		In Newfoundland:	Bartholemew Scannell, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					John Scanlan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)

		Modern status:		Scattered.


SHEA:		a surname of England, (O) SHEA of Ireland; in England a variant of SHAVE, 
		SHAW; In Ireland (O) Shea, O Seaghdha, Ir. seaghdha - hawklike, stately. 
		(MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght primarily in Co. Kerry, later in Cos. 
		Kilkenny and Tipperary.

		In Newfoundland:	John Shea, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)


		Modern status:		Shea, widespread.


SKANES:		a surname of England, ? of Scandinavian origin, but probably confused with 
		the surname of Ireland (Mac) Skehan (See SKEHANS). Matthews traced Skains, 
		Scaianes in Devon. (SEE ALSO SKEHANS BELOW)

		In Newfoundland:	Charles Skean, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					George Skean, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Michael Skean, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Richard Skean, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Thomas Skean, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)

		Modern status:		Scattered, especially at Bell Island.


SKEHANS:	SKEHEN, variants of the surname of Ireland (Mac) Skehan, Mac Sceachain ? Ir. 
		sceach - briar, or confused with SKANES. (MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced 
		(Mac) Skehan in Cos. Monaghan, Louth and Tipperary.
		(SEE ALSO SKANES ABOVE)

		In Newfoundland:	William, of Colliers, 1793 (CO 199.18)
					William Schehan Sr, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					William Schehan Jr, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					John Skean, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					William Skean, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					George Skean, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Skean, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Charles Skean, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Richard Skean, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John Skean, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:		Skehans, rare. Skehen, unique.


WALL:		a surname of England and Ireland, in England and Old English weall- 
		(dwelller by the town, sea, or ruined Roman) wall or in the  West Midlands 
		dialect area where walle is for welle-(dweller by  the)spring or stream; 
		in Ireland for the Norman surname de Valle  gaelicized as de Bhal. (Reaney , 
		Cottle, MacLysaght).  Traced by Guppy in Derbyshire, Durham, Herefordshire, 
		Shropshire,  Somerset and Worcestershire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by  
		MacLysaght in Limerick and Connacht.

		In Newfoundland:	John, of Colliers, 1801  (CO 199.18)

		Modern Status: 		Widespread


WALSH:		a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland from Old English woelisc, Middle 
		English walsche - foreigner (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght)  See also 
		Wallace, Wallis, Welsh. Traced by Guppy in Lancashire, by Spiegelhalter in 
		Devon, and by MacLysaght as the fourth numerous of Irish surnames.

		In Newfoundland:	Peter Walsh, of Colliers, 1835 (Voters List)
					Thomas Walsh, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Henry Walsh, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
	 				Peter Walsh, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)

		Modern status:  	Widespread in all districts


WELLS:	 	a surname of England, Scotland, and Ireland from the English place name 
		Wells (Norfolk, Somerset) , or from Old English wella - (dweller by the) 
		well(s), spring(s), stream(s). (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght 73). 
		See also (ATWELL). WELLON, WILLS, WELLMAN. Found widespread by Guppy, in 
		Devon by Spiegelhalter, in Dumfriesshire by Black (Where it is pronounced 
		Walls) , and mainly in northeast Ulster by MacLysaght, though in Munster 
		and Leinster in teh thirteenth century.

		In Newfoundland:	Theophilus, of Cupids, 1796, of Colliers, 1798 (Co 199.18

		Modern Status:		Widespread


WHELAN:a surname of Ireland, with a variant WHALEN,  (O) Whelan, Ó Faoldin, Ir. faol - wolf, a variant of PHELAN, or sometimes an abbreviation of Whelehan, 
or occasionally a synonym of Hyland. Whalen is recorded by E.C. Smith but 
not by MacLysaght. MacLysaght found Whelan numerous in the country  between 
Cos. Wexford,  Tipperary and Wexford, and rare in Ulster.

		In Newfoundland:	Mary  Whealon, of Colliers, 1778 (CO 199.18)
					James Whelan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					John Whelan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Matthew Whelan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Matthew Whelan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Michael Whelan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Nicholas Whelan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					Samuel Whelan, farmer of Colliers, 
					1871 (Lovell's Directory)
					All of the above plus more on 1894-97 as follows:	
					James of Matt Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					George Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Thomas Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					David Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Matt of Mich'l Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Lawrence Whelan, Sr. fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick Whelan, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James of Matt Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James of Sam'l Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James of Mich'l Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Patrick Whelan, Sr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Lawrence Whelan, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Timothy Whelan, Jr., fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Michael Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					John of Matt Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Wm of Matt Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					James of James Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Timothy of James Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Wm. Of James Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					David Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)
					Mich'l of John Whelan, fisherman of Colliers, 
					1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory)


		Modern status:		Whalen, widespread, especially at St. John's,
					Whelan, widespread, especially  at St. John's, 
					Colliers and Bauline.

 

 

Contributed by: Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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