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As always, confirm these, as you would any other source material.

Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe
that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these
Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood
and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr.
Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood,
as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's,
although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match
for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The
people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish
till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

Any questions or comments, or to report any errors, please contact me by using the "contact" button below.

COMMUNITY OF CHAMBERLAINS:


(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

 

 

	ANTHONY , CASEY, CHEATER, DOWDEN, DUNN, EBBS, FACEY, FITZPATRICK, FOSTER,
	FOWLER, HENNEBURY, HIBBS, HISCOCK, MERCER, METCALF(E), MILLER, MITCHELL,
	MURPHY, SLADE, SMITH, SQUIRE(S), STICKLEY, TAYLOR, TILLEY



ANTHONY: a baptismal name and surname of England, Wales and Ireland, Ant (h) oine of France, Anthony and Ant (h) oine of the Channel Islands, from the Latin personal name Antonius, of unknown origin, the name of many saints. Withycombe comments on the spelling and pronuncation: "The intrusive h in the spelling Anthony was a later development, and seems not to appear before the late 16th century. It may have been the result of false etymologizing, for Camden (1605) derives the name from Greek anthos (flower). The h is, of course, silent, but there is some danger nowadays of a spelling pronuncation (already in use in USA), and the older spelling is to be preferred."(Reaney, Withycombe, Turk). Guppy found Anthony mostly in South Wales, and in smaller number in Norfolk,Derbyshire and Devon; McLysaght in Waterford since the 17th century. In Newfoundland: Elizabeth Anthony of Chamberlains, 1838 (DPHW 26D) Modern Status: small numbers in several communities in the Con. Bay and elsewhere.
CASEY: a surname of Ireland, either (Mac) Casey, Mac Cathasaigh, (O) Casey, O Cathasaigh, Ir. Cathasach - watchful.(MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced (Mac) Casey formerly in Co. Monaghan, (O) Casey in all provinces (especially Southwest Munster) , except Ulster. "Owing to dropping the prefixes Mac and O, Casey families properly MacCasey are now thought to be O'Casey" (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Patrick, of Chamberlains, 1838 (DPHW 26D) Patrick Casey, fisherman of Chamberlains,1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
CHEATER: a surname of England, from eschetour - escheater, an officer appointed to look after the king's escheats, that is, properly that reverts to the crown in the absence of legal hiers of claimants. See also Cater for Chaytor to which some Cheaters in Newfoundland changed their name. (Reaney). In Newfoundland: George Cheater, of Chamberlains, 1826 (DPHW 26B) George Cheater of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voster's List) George Chafer of Chmaberilains, Church Society Reports, 1852 George Chaytor, of Chamberlains, 1859 (DPHW 26D) John Cheater, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Samuel Cheater, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert G. Cheator, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John A, Cheator, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Samuel Cheator, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Cheator, Sr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Cheator, Jr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Frederick Cheator, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Alexander Cheator, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Rare
DOWDEN: a surname of England and Ireland, ? from an unidentified place name, or ? a variant of DOWDING. Traced in Hampshire. In Newfoundland: Thomas Dowden of Chamberlain, 1835 (Voter's List) Thomas, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Dowden, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Maurice Dowden, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Seal Cove and St. John's.
DUNN: a surname of England, Ireland and Scotland; in England from an Old English personal name Dun, Old English dunn - dull brown, dark, swarthy; in Ireland (O) Dunne,O Duinn or O Doinn, Ir. donn - brown, "usually spelt with the final e"; in Scotland originally from Celtic donn - brown or from a Scots place name ? Dun (Angus). (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black). Guppy traced Dunn in ten countries, including especially Yorkshire, Durham, Northumberland, Warwickshire, Devon and Dorset and found it widespread south of the forth and Clyde. MacLysaght found (O)Dunn(e) "one of the most numerous name in the Middle countries." In Newfoundland: William Dunn, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Dunn, scattered; Dunne scattered, especially at St John's
EBBS: ? with a variant Epps, surnames of England, pet - forms of the baptismal names Isabel and Herbert. Withycombe, Reaney, Bardsley). Matthews traced Epps in Dorset. In Newfoundland: Thomas Ebbs, of Chamberlains, 1827 (DPHW 26B) Modern status: Ebbs, rare at Topsail and St. John's
FACEY: one of twenty-eight variants noted by Reaney of a surname of England from Anglo-French enveise - playful. Other forms are Vaisey, VOISEY, Feasey, Fheazey. Spiegelhalter, however, sees Facey as a short form of the baptismal name Boniface, adopted by several popes. (Withycombe, Reaney, Spiegelhalter traced Facey in Devon. In Newfoundland: William Facey, of Chamberlains, 1832 (DPHW 30) Modern status: at St. John's & Twillingate
FITZPATRICK: a surname of England and Ireland, Mac Giolla Phadraig - devotee of St. Patrick, "The only Fitz name of Gaelic-Irish origin", the others being of Norman origin. (MacLysaght). See PATRICK. Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Kilkenny, Fermanagh and Leix. In Newfoundland: Lawrence Fitzpatrick, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
FOSTER: a surname of England, Ireland and Scotland, from Middle English foster - foster - parent, nurse, or a development of For(e)ster - forester, or from Forseter - shearer, cutter, or a variant of Fewster - saddle-tree maker. (Reaney, Cottle). Found widespread by Guppy especially in Nottinghamshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Ulster. In Newfoundland: Edward Foster, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
FOWLER: a surname of England and Ireland, in England from Old Englsih fuzelere - hunter of wild birds, fowler, in Ireland for Fowloo, a variant of FOLEY. See also FOWLOW. (Reaney, MacLysaght). Found widespread by Guppy especially in Gloucestershire and Dorset, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: John Fowler of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voter's List) Henry Fowler of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voter's List) Henry Fowler, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Henry Fowler Junior, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Fowler, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Levi Fowler, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Fowler, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Esau Fowler, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Fowler, Sr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Fowler, Jr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Fowler, Sr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Fowler, Jr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Henry Fowler, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Fowler, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Zachariah Fowler, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread, especially at Chamberlains and St John's
HENNEBURY: a surname of England, from the English place Henbury (Dorset, Gloucestershire, Cheshire) or ? Hanbury (Staffordshire, Worchestershire); Henebry, of Ireland, formerly of de Hindeberg and gaelicized de Hionburgha (Ekwall, MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaghtin Cos. Kilkenny and Waterford. In Newfoundland: Michael Hennebury, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Scattered
HIBBS: a surname of England from a petform of the baptismal names Isabel (Elizabeth) from the Hebrew - my God (is) satisfaction, or Ilbert from the Old German personal name Hildeberht containing the elements strife and bright. (Withcombe, Reaney). In Newfoundland: George Hibbs of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voter's List) Thomas Hibbs of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voter's List) Modern status: Scattered
HISCOCK: HISCOTT, surnames of England, diminutives of Hitch (Richard) (See RICHARDS) of from the English place name Hiscott (Devon). (Reaney, Spiegelhalter). See ALCOCK. Traced by Guppy in Berkshire, Dorset, Somerset and Wiltshire, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: Edward Hiscock, Sr., of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voter's List) Edward Hiscock, Jr., of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voter's List) William, of Chamberlains, deceased 1854 (Newfoundlander 4 Sept 1854) Edward Hiscock, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Hiscock, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Hiscock, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Hiscock, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Hiscock, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Francis J. Hiscock, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Hiscock Sr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Hiscock Jr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Hiscock Sr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Hiscock Jr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Hiscock, widespread. Hiscott, rare at Bell Island.
MERCER: a surname of England and Ireland, Old French merc(h)ier - merchant, especially a dealer in silks, velvets and other costly f abrics. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Kent and Lancashire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Antrim and Down and as Mercier in Co. Offaly and other midland counties. In Newfoundland: John Mercer, planter of Chamberlains, 1826 (DPHW 34) John Mercer of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voter's List) John Mercer, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Jonathan Mercer, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Mercer, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Jacob Mercer, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Tobias Mercer, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Mercer, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Joseph Mercer, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Jonathan Mercer, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread.
METCALF(E): surnames of England and Ireland , of uncertian origin, ? from Old English *mets-cealf - a calf fattened for food, hence a nickname for a fat man. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Cumberland, Westmorland, Durham, Lancashire and Yorkshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in Ireland since the 17th century. In Newfoundland: Nicholas and James, of Chamberlains, 1801 (CO 199.18) James Metcalf, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) John Metcalf, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) James Metcalf, Jr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Metcalfe, at Bell Island and Harbour Main District.
MILLER: a surname a England, Ireland and Scotland, from Middle English mylne - mill or Old Norse mylnari - miller. Miller is an assimilated formof Milner. Millar is a Scots form. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Black). Guppy traced Miller in 14 counties in England, and Millar and Miller over the greater part of Scotland though rare in the North. MacLysaght found Millar and Miller very numerous in Co. Antrim and adjacent countries. In Newfoundland: Elizabeth, of Chamberlains, 1837 (DPHW 26D) Modern status: Widespread.
MITCHELL: a surname of England, Scotland, Ireland, the Channel Islands and of the Micmacs of Newfoundland, from the baptismal name Michael (See MICHAEL(S), or from Old English mycel, Middle English michel etc. - big; also in Connacht often a synonym of (O) Mulvihill) O Maoilmhichil - devotee of (Saint) Michael. (Reaney, MacLysaght, Turk). Found widespread by Guppy in England and Scotland as far north as Aberdeen and by MacLysaght in all provinces except Munster. In Newfoundland: Alexander Mitchell, granted land at Chamberlains, 1850 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands) Modern status: Widespread.
MURPHY: a surname of Ireland and Scotland, (O) Murphy, O Murchadha, Ir. murchadh - sea-warrior, or Mac Murphy, Mac Murchada. MacLysaght notes that the "resumption of the prefixes O and Mac, which is a modern tendency with most Gaelic names, has not taken place in the case of Murphy, " that the majority of the Murphys in Ulster were probably oringinally Mac Murphy, and that Murphy is the most common name in Ireland. It occurs in Scotland from Irish immigration. (MacLysaght, Cottle). In Newfoundland: John Murphy, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Widespread
SLADE: a surname of England from Old English slxd - (dweller in the) valley, or from the English place name Slade (Lancashire, Devon). (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter). Traced by Guppy in Devon and especially in Somerset. In Newfoundland: Matthew Slade, of Chamberlains, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Slade, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Edward Slade, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: scattered
SMITH: SYMTH, surnames of England, Scotland, Ireland and Guernsey (Channel Islands) from Old English smith - smith, blacksmith, farrier, metal-worker, or smiththe - (worker at the) smithy; in Ireland also a synonym of Gow and McGOWAN> "The primate and patriarch of our surnames, its form unchanged for over 1,000 years; forms with medial-y-and final -e are usually both ignorant and affected, though the first may sometimes have been used for clarity next to the minim letter m, and -e may rarely represent 'smithy'….Easily the commonest surname in England and Wales (though JONES is far ahead in Wales alone), Scotland, and U.S.A., and the fifth in Ireland in 1890 … It is thus a frequent victim of hyphenation, either in a sincere effort to advoid ambiguity or in an insincere one to sound distinque; and it has resently gathered to itself many changed foreign surnames. Yet it remains primitive: a smith smites, and his honoured name rings down the ages like an anvil." (Cottle, Turk). Smith found widespead by Guppy in England and Scotland, especially south of the Forth and Clyde and by MacLysaght in Co. Cavan; Smyth traced by Guppy in Devon and Suffolk and by Cottle in Northern Ireland. See also SMYTH. In Newfoundland: George Smith of Chamberlains, 1835 (Voter's List) George, planter of Chamberlains, 1841 (DPHW 26B) Modern status: Widespread, throughout all districts.
SQUIRE(S): surnames of England from Old French escuyer, Middle English squyer - shield-bearer, esquier, a young gentelmen attending a knight. (Reaney, Cottle). See also SWYERS. Traced by Guppy in Bedfordshire, Devon, Leicestershire, Ruthlandshire and Nottinghamshire, with Squires "far the least frequent, occurring in Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire." In Newfoundland: Benjamin Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains (Harbour Main), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Ebenezer Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains (Harbour Main), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Lionel Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains (Harbour Main), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William James Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains (Harbour Main), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Elijah Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Robert Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Wm. J. Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Lionel Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) George Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Benjamin Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Thomas Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Lionel Squires, Jr., fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Alexander Squires, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern status: Squires, widespread.
STICKLEY: a surname of England ? from the England place name Strickley Coppice (Dorset) - steep meadow (by the) wood. (Fagerten, Bardsley). Traced by Bardsley in Somerset in 1327-8. In Newfoundland: Thomas, of Chamberlains, 1804 (CO 199.18) Modern status: Rare at Catalina
TAYLOR: a surname of England and Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, with Tayler of Guernsey from Old French tailleor, Anglo- French tailleur- tailor. (Reaney, Black , MacLysaght, Turk). Found widespread by Guppy in England and Scotland, and by MacLysaght in Ulster and Dublin. In Newfoundland: Richard Taylor, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modern Status: Widespread
TILLEY: a surname of England, Tilly of Ireland and France; in England from Old English tilia, Middle English tilie - tiller, fanner, or diminutive of Till (Matilda), or from the English place names Tilley (Shropshire) or Tiley (Dorset), or from the French place naime Tilly (Aube, Calvados, etc.); in Ireland a variant of (Mac) Tully, Mac an Tuile or of (O)Tally, Ó Taithligh, Ir. taithleach - peaceable. (Reaney, Spiegelhalter, Dauzat, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Tilley in Somerset and Spiegelhalter Till(e)y in Devon. In Newfoundland: Henry Tilley, fisherman of Chamberlains, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Dir) Modem status: Widespread, especially at St. John's and Kelligrews.

 

 

TRANSCRIBED AND PROVIDED BY: Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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