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Community surnames extracts from Seary's Names of the Island of Newfoundland, 1835 Voters Lists, 1864-65 Hutchinson 1871 Lovell's Directory, 1894-97 McAlpine's Directory, 1898 McAlpine's Directory, 1904 McAlpine's as well as some parish records and cemetery inscriptions.

There were names in these communities that were not picked up by Seary and I believe that the some of the entries for the earlier Hr. Grace (HGRC) were surnames of these Conception Bay communities

A couple of examples of why I believe this is as follows:

Barron/Barren (Holyrood) There is a James on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood and on the 1864-65 directory as a fisherman. Seary shows a James Barron or Barren of Hr. Grace Parish, 1806 (NF. Archives HGRC)

Targate (Holyrood): There is a John Targate on the 1835 Voters List for Holyrood, as well as on the 1864-65 directory and the Targate surname still appeared on the 1871 Lovell's, although John was no longer listed. Seary shows a John Targate of Hr. Grace, 1813 (NF Archives HGRC)

Based on the above, I believe that one can safely assume that if this name appears to be a match for one of your ancestors from the Conception Bay Centre area, ten chances to one, it is. The people "up the bay" as it was called, used St. Paul's Anglican and Immaculate Conception Parish till they became a part of the parish of Brigus in 1833.

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COMMUNITY OF BELL ISLAND
(LANCE COVE, WABANA, FRESHWATER, KELLY'S ISLAND & BELL ISLAND):

(Please click on a name to jump directly to that name)

	ADAMS , BENNETT, BERRIGAN, BICKFORD, BLAKE, BOWD(E)RING, BREEN, 
	BRIAN(D), BROWN(E),BRYNE, BURT, BUTLER, CALLA(G)HAN, CHURCHILL, 
	CLEMENS, CONNORS, COOPER,CUMMINGS, DELAHUNTY, DOMINAS, DOOLING,
	DOYLE, DWYER, EARL(E), FARDY,FITZGERALD, FITZPATRICK, FOLEY, 
	FORAN, GARLAND, GARNER, GRAY, HALEY, HAMMOND, HARRIGAN, HARVEY, 
	HAYMAN, HISCOCK, JACKMAN, JANES, JORDAN, JUDGE, KAVANAGH, KEARNEY, 
	KEHOE, KELLY, KENNEDY, KENT, KING, LAHEY, LANGLEY, LAWTON, LEAHEY, 
	LONG, MAHAR, MARTIN, MERCER, MIFFLEN, MURPHY, NORMAN, NORMORE,OATES, 
	PARSONS, PEARL, PIPPY, PITT(S), POWER, QUIGLEY,REDMOND, REES(E), 
	REEVE(S), RICE, ROBERTS, ROFF, SEARLE,SIMPSON, SKANES, SNOW, SOMMERS, 
	SPARK(E)S SQUIRE(S), STARES, STEPHENS, STONE, STOYLES, SWEENEY, 
	THISTLE, WALTERS, WATERMAN, WHITE

 

 
 

 

ADAMS:			a surname of England and Ireland with Adam and MacAdam 
			scattered in Scotland, and Adamson common in the north of England and 
			south of the Forth and Clyde.  In England it means "son of Adam", a 
			baptismal name from Hebew  Adam - red; in Ireland (Co. Down), it is 
			a synonym of Aidy and Eadie.  See also ADE, AIKEN.  (Reany, McLysaght). 
			Guppy found the name widespread, especially in Devon, Shropshire 
			and Staffordhsire.

In Newfoundland:	Thomas of Little Bell Isle (now Little Bell Island),  
			1825 (DPHW 26B)

Modern Status:		widespread

BENNETT: a surname of England, Ireland, Scotland, Bennet of Jersey (Channel Islands), from the Old French Beneit, Bebeoit, Latin Benedictus - blessed, " a common christian name from the 12th century." (Reaney, Turk) Guppy found Bennett widespread in England (with Bennetts in Cornwall). Bennet is the common form in Scotland (Black) and in the north of England (Cottle). In Ireland, Bennett has been prominent in Kilkenny and adjacent countries since the 14th century. In Newfoundland: John Bennett, of Great Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1827 (DPHW 26B) Edward Bennett, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Francis Bennett, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Bennett, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Bennett, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Oliver Bennett, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Bennett, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Bennett, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: widespread
BERRIGAN: a variant of the surname of Ireland (O) Bergin, O' hAimheirgin, lately contracted to O' Beirgin, from the Irish aimhirgin - wondrous birth, now associated with Co. Leix. (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Mary Baragan, from Belisle (now Bell Island), married at St. John's, 1832 (NF Archives BRC) Modern status: at Ferryland (Electors 1955) and St. John's
BICKFORD: Beckford, surnames of England from the English place names Bickford, Beckaford and Beckford (Devon) or Beckford (Gloucestershire), or Bickford (Somerset). Bardsley cites both forms. See also PICKFORD. Bickford was traced by Guppy in Staffordshire, and by Speigelhalter and Matthews in Devon. In Newfoundland: Henry Beckford, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern Status: Bickford on Bell Island, especially at Bickfordville (Electors 1955)
BLAKE: a surname of England, Ireland and Scotland; in England and Scotland of the same dual origin as BLACK; in Ireland for de Blaca or more correctly le Blaca - black, or for Blowick, O' Blathmhaic, Ir. blath - fame, mac - son in Cos. Mayo and Fermanagh. (Reaney, Black, MacLysaght). The name was traced by Guppy in the south of England, especially in Wiltshire, Cornwall, Berkshire and Oxfordshire; by Matthews and Spiegelhalter in Devon; and by MacLysaght in Cos. Galway, Kildare, Mayo, and Fermanagh. In Newfoundland: John Blake, of Great Belle Isle (now Bell Island), 1770 (DPHW 26C) Modern Status: widespread
BOWD(E)RING: Newfoundland variants of the surnames of Ireland Bowdern, Bowdren, probably from an Anglo-Norman place name Boderan (untraced). (MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced Bowderin, Bowdren in Co. Waterford. In Newfoundland: Family tradition - Bowdrings among the earlier settlers on Bell Island with which the name is still and almost entirely assocaited (MUN Hist). John Bowdran, fisherman, Bell Island, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Medoph Bowdran, fisherman, Bell Island, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Bowdran, fisherman, Bell Island, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Bowdring, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Medolph Bowdring, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Bowdring, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Bowdring, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Edward Bowdring, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Bowdring, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: Bowdering, unique at St. John's and Bowdring at Bell Island and St. John's
BREEN: a surname of Ireland, O' Braoin. See also BREWIN. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Offaly and Roscommon. In Newfoundland: ? James Breen, of Bell Island, (NTS Grey Islands Harbour), 1871 (Lovell's Directory) ? Michael Breen, of Bell Island, (NTS Grey Islands Harbour 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern Status: scattered
BRIAN (D): (O) BRIEN, BRYAN (T), surnames, in one or more of the preceding variants, of England, Scotland, Ireland and France, from a Breton personal name containing the element bri - height, dignity, esteem (Dauzat, Black), or from a " Keltic (Old Welsh/Irish) name containing the element bre - hill" (Cottle), of simular form and significance. See also BRYNE. (MacLysaght, Reaney). As a baptismal name "Brian or Bryan has from early times been a favourite in Ireland on account of the national hero Brian Boroimhe; but it was, during the Middle Ages, equally popular in England...[when] for several centuries it was a favourite, as the many commom surnames derived from it testlfy....it survived in Yorks [hire] Westmoreland, Cheshire, Lanc [ashire] until the 18th century, but gradually fell into disuse and came to be regarded as as exclusively Irish name. It is still used in Brittany and has come back into use in England durin the present century" (Withycomb). As a family name in England, Reaney, who gives twelve variants, maintains that in the south it is a Breton personal name introduced by the Normans, and, according to Black, "by Bretons who among the Normans in the invasion of England", but in the north "it is O[ld] Ir [ish] Brian, bought by Norsemen from Iceland...to Cumberland and acrossthe Pennines into Yorkshire." In Scotland, Black cites the forms Brian, Brien and Bryan, ans ascribes the Breton origin to them, as does Dauzat, Briant, Brie nd. In Ireland, MacLysaght sees the family O'Brien, O'Briain "deriving from the famiy of King Brian Boru", but notices that O'Brien may also be a synonym of O'Bryne (SEE BRYNE), of Bryan, and of MacBryan, Mac Braoin. Guppy traced Bryan widespread, especially in Leicestershire and Rutlandshire and Oxford- shire, Bryant especially in Somerset and Wiltshire. Spiegalehalter traced Brian, Bryan (t) in Devon. Matthews traced Brien, Bryan in Ireland, Devon and Dorset. Briant and Bryant in Devon. MacLysaght found O'Brien "now very numerous in other provinces as well as Munster, being the fifth most numerous name in Ireland", Bryan " The name of a prominent Anglo-Norman family settled in Co. Kilkenny", and MacBryan, sometimes changed to O'Brien in Cos. Fermanagh and Cavan. In Newfoundland: Robert Brine, butcher, of Bell Island, 1794-95, (Cencus 1794-95) Modern Status: O'Brien - widespread especially at Bell Island and Topsail
BROWN (E): a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland, Brown of the Channel Islands, from Old English personal name Brun, or from Old English or Old French for one with brown hair or complexion; or, in Scotland , for Mac a' Chriuthainn from Gaelic briteamh (ain) - brehon, brieve, judge or for M'lle dhuinn - son of the brown lad. (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght, Turk). In England, the form Browne tends to indicate "a rise in the social scale", (Guppy, Cottle),but it is the usual form in Ireland. Widespread in England, Scotland and Ireland. In Newfoundland: John Brown, of Great Belle Isle (now Bell Island), 1771 (DPHW 26C) Patrick Brown, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Brown, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Brown, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Brown, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Michael Brown, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Brown, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Brown, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern Status: Brown - widespread; Browne - St. John's
BRYNE: or Brine, ? variant of BRIAN, BRIEN, etc. and BYRNE. Guppy traced Brine in Dorset, Matthews also in Devon. In Newfoundland: see Brian(d) above for entries Modern Status: Brine at Catalina, but elsewhere apparently replaced especially by Brien
BURT: a surname of England, Scotland and Jersey (Channel Islands), from the Old English beorht - bright, beautiful, fair. See also BRIGHT. (Reaney, Tulk). Traced by Guppy in Dorset, Lincolnshire, Sussex and Wiltshire and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: Thomas Burtt, planter, of Bell Island, 1708-09 (CO 194.4) Modern Status: widespread
BUTLER: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French bouteillier - servant in charge of the wine-cellar, usually the head servant. "In some early examples, an officer of high rank nominally connected with the supply and importation of wine". (Reany). Later examples may be for Bottler - maker of (leather) bottles. Guppy found Butler widespread. Spiegelhalter traced it in Devon. MacLysaght found it widespread in all provinces except Ulster. Black comments that Butler appears to have been ousted in Scotland by SPENCE. In Newfoundland: James Butler, of Little Bell Island, 1708-09 (CO 194. 4) Modern Status: widespread
CALLA(G)HAN: surnames of Ireland, (O) Callaghan, O' Ceallachain, ? from Ir. ceallach strife. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in the form (O) Callaghan, in Cos. Cork and Clare. In Newfoundland: Thomas Callaghan, of Belle Isle (now Bell Island), 1812 (DPHW 26D, D'Alberti 31) Modern Status: scattered
CHURCHILL: a surname of England, from the England place name Churchill (Devon), Somerset, Worcestershire, Warwickshire), or (dweller on the) Church-hill. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Dorset and Middlesex, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: Family Traditions: ______, from Ireland, settled at Bell Island (Mun Folklore). William, from Ringwood (Hampshire), fisherman of Little Bell Island, decreased 1815 (Royal Gazette 14th Dec 1815); Philip and Samuel, of Topsail, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
CLEMENS: CLEMENTS, CLEMMENS, surnames of England and Ireland, Clemon(t)s of Jersey (Channel Islands), Clement a baptismal Name, from Latin Clemens, French Clement - mild, merciful, the name of a saint and of several popes, and from the corresponding Woman's name Clemence, from Latin clementia - mildness. In Ireland Clements is also a variant of Mac Clement, Mac Laghmainn . (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Clement(s) in Devon, Leicestershire And Ruthlandshire and South Wales; MacLysaght traced Clements in Cos. Leitrim, Donegal and Derry; Matthews traced Clement(s) in Dorset, Gloucestershire and Jersey. In Newfoundland: William Clements, from Cornwall, of Lance Cove (Bell Island), 1827 (DPHW 70, MUN Hist.) William Clement, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
CONNORS: O'Connors, surnames of Ireland, O Conchobhiar. Maclysaght comments that in Ireland, "the prefix O, formerly widely discarded,Has been generally resumed. Similary the varivant Connors has become O'Connor again." Widespead in Ireland, esecially in Co. Kerry. In Newfoundland: Michael of Bell Island, 1842 (DPHW 26D) John Conners, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Connors, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Connors, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Michael Connors, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
COOPER: a surname of England , Ireland, Scotland, and the Channel Island, from Middle English couper - maker or repairer of wooden casks, buckets or tubs. (Reaney, Turk). Found widespread in England and Scotland by Guppy and Black, and by MacLysaght particularly in Co. Sligo. In Newfoundland: Edward, of Great Belle Isle (now Belle Island), 1797 (D'Alberti 7); Edward, pioneer of Lance Cove (Belle Island), died 1825, aged 61 years (MUN Hist.) James Cooper, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern Status: Widespread
CUMMINGS: a surname with several variants, of England, Scotland and Ireland; in England and Scotland from a personal name probably of Breton origin ? Cu(n)min; in Ireland "(O) Commane, Commons, O Comain (in Muster) and O Cuimin (in Connacht). Usually called Commons in Co. Wexford and Cummins in Co. Cork. O Comain has become Hurley in some parts of Cos. Clare and Cork, due to the mistaken belief that in derives from caman, a hurley [the stick used in the Irish came of hurling]. Woulfe says it is from cam, which is equally doubtful. " (MacLysaght). (Reaney, Black, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Cuming, Spiegelhalter Cuming, Cummings and Comins in Devon; Guppy traced Cumming in Inverness-shire and adjacent countries; MacLysaght traced Cummins in Co. Cork. In Newfoundland: Anthony Cummins fisherman of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Cummins, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Cummins, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Anthony Cummins, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Moses Cummins, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John of Anth'y Cummins, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Moses Cummins, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John of John Cummins, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Richard Cummins, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Anthony Cummins, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
DELAHUNTY: a surname of Ireland (O) Delahunt (y), O Dulchaointigh, Ir. duluhaointeach - plaintive, satirist. (MacLsaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Offaly. In Newfoundland: Family tradition: -------- Delahunty was an early Irish settler on Bell Island (MUN Hist.). Lawrence Delahunty, farmer of Holyrood, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Dillenty, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Patrick Dillenty, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Rare, at St John's, Bell Island and Calvert.
DOMINAS: a surname of Lithuania. In Newfoundland: Family tradition: John Dominas, born in Lithuania in 1892, settled on Bell Island about 1927 (Mun Folklore). Modern status: At Bell Island (Electors 1955).
DOOLING: a surname of Ireland, the Munster variant of (O) Dowling, O Dunlaing. (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Daniel Doolan, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Rare in St. John's districts.
DOYLE: a surname of Ireland, (O) Doyle, O Dubhghaill, Ir. dubh - black, gall - foreigner, of Norse origin. (Reaney, MacLysaght). MacLysaght describes (O) Doyle as one of the most numerous nams in Leinster, In Newfoundland: James Doyle, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread, especially in Avondale
DWYER: (O)Dwyer surnames of Ireland. ODuibhir, Ir. dubh and odhar (genitive uidhir) - dark or duncoloured. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Tipperary. In Newfoundland: Martin, of Bell Island, 1794 -5, "31 years in Newfoundland" that is, 1763 -4 (Cencus 1794 -5) Dennis Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Martin Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Martin Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Michael Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Joseph Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Edward Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Daniel Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Martin Dwyer, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Dwyer, widespread, especially at Bell Island (Electors 1955), Tilting and St John's; O'Dwyer, rare at St John'
EARL(E): EARLES, surname of England and Ireland, from Old English eorl - earl (the only rank in the peerage from an Old English word), from service in an earl's household, or from playing the part in a pageant, or as a nickname for one who bore himself proudly like an earl. (Reaney, Cottle). Guppy traced Earl (e) in Devon; MacLysaght traced Earls in Co. Galway since the 13th century, Earle, of much later introdutction, is not closely associated with any particular area. In Newfoundland: John Earle, of Little Bell Island, defended his property against the French in 1696 - 7 (D.W. Prowse) Modern status: Earl scattered, Earle widespread
FARDY: a surname of Ireland, ? a variant of the English surname Faraday, of unknown origin. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Wexford. In Newfoundland: Early instances: Martin, of Belle Isle (now Bell Island), 1805 (Nfld. Archives BRC) Modern status: Widespread
FITZGERALD: a surname of England and Ireland, in Irish MacGerailt - son of Gerald. (Reaney, macLysaght). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and found "very numeruos" by MacLysaght. In Newfoundland: John Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Matthew Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Patrick Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Edward Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Fitzgerald, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
FITZPATRICK: a surname of England and Ireland, Mac Giolla Phadraig - devotee of St. Patrick, "The only Fitz name of Gaelic-Irish origin", the others being of Norman origin. (MacLysaght). See PATRICK. Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Kilkenny, Fermanagh and Leix. In Newfoundland: Owen Fitzpatrick, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Fitzpatrick, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
FOLEY: a surname of England, Ireland and Guernsey (Channel Island); in England and Guernsey, ? a variant of FOLLETT; in Ireland (O) Foley, O Foghladha, Ir. foghlaidhe - plunderer, though in Co. Roscommon a synonym of Mac Sharry, MacSearraigh, from searrach - foal. MacLysaght states that "The distinguished English family of Foley is said to be of Irish origin," but Cottle suggests that the Worchestershire family has probably anouther origin. (MacLysaght, Cottle, Bardsley, Turk). See also FOWLER. Traced by MacLysaght in the South Munster and Co. Roscommon, by Cottle and Bardsley in Worchestershire and neighbouring counties, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: Francis Foley, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
FORAN: a surname of Ireland (O) Foran, O Fuarain. (O) Forhane, Forahan, O Fuarthain, are " older forms of Foran used in Cos. Kerry and West Cork." (MacLysaght). "Mainly found in Cos. Limerick and Waterford; also often changed to FORD." (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Edward Foran, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1812 (Nfld. Archives BRC) Modern status: At St John's
GARLAND: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland; in England and Scotland - (a maker or seller of metal) garland(s) or chaplets, or from Old English gara - (dweller by the ) gore, triangular piece of land, or from the English place name Garland (Devon), or from an inn sign, or from an Old French grailler - to bark; in Ireland for the surname Gernon, Gearnun, which it has "almost entirely superseded." (Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Meath and Louth. In Newfoundland: John, of Little Bell Island, 1708-09 (CO 194.4) Modern status: Scattered
GARNER: a surname of England, from the Old French personal name Garnier, or Old French gern(I)er - (keeper of the) granary, or a late form of GARDNER, or a dialect form of Warner. (Reaney, S piegelhalter). Traced by Guppy in Cheshire, Leicestershire and Rutlandshire, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: James and William, planters of Belle Isle south 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Rare
GRAY: Grey, surnames of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the Old English grxg - grey (-haired), or from the French place name Graye (Calvados). In Ireland, Connacht and Co. Longford, Gray is also for Culreavy. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). Guppy found Gray widespread in England and in southern Scotland, Grey in Durman and Northhumberland. Spiegelhalter traced Gray in Devon. In Newfoundland: John Grey,of Great Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1770 (DPHW 26C) Modern status: Gray, scattered. Grey, rare.
HALEY: HAYLEY, surnames of England and Ireland, from the English place name,Hailey (Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire), or (Dweller by the) hay field. (O) Haly in Ireland, however, is a variant of HEAL(E)Y or HANLEY. Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght, E.C. Smith). Haley traced by Guppy in Yorkshire WR; Hay(e)y by Spiegelhalter in Devon; (O) Haly by MacLysaght formerly in Co. Cork, also on Co. Limerick. In Newfoundland: Robert, soldier of Great Belle Isle (now Bell Island, 1771 (DPHW 26C). Modern status: Haley, scattered. Hayley, at Bonavista.
HAMMOND: a surname of England and Ireland from the Old German personal names Haimo, or Old French Hamond. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght 73). Traced by Guppy in the east and southeast countries and near the Welsh border, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: James Hammond, fisherman of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Michael Hammond, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Hammond, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: scattered
HARRIGAN: a surname of Ireland, (O) Harrigan, in south and west Munster usually a variant of Horgan (See ORGAN), of for a former Leix sept O hArragain. (MacLysaght). In Newfoundland: Margaret Harragan, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1822 (Nfld. Archives BRC) John Harrigan, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Rare
HARVEY: a baptismal name and surname of England, Scotland, Ireland and the Channel Islands, from the personal names Old French Herve, Old Breton Aeruiu, Harviu - battle worthy, introduced by the Bretons at the Norman Conquest, or occasionally from Old German Herewig - army war; in Ireland also occasionally for O hAirmheadhaigh, ? Ir. airmheadhach - having a herd of cattle, or ? Ir. airmed - a measure of grain. (Withcombe, Reaney, Black, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). See HARVIEW. Found widespread by Guppy, especially in Cornwall, Hampshire and Kent, and generally distribted (in a variety of forms) in Scotland, and by MacLysaght in Ulster, and Cos. Wexford and Galway. In Newfoundland: William Harvey, school teacher of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
HAYMAN: a surname of England, from ? Old English (gel) hxg - (dweller by the ) enclosure, or ? heg, hig - (seller of) hay, or ? heah - high, tall, or a variant of HAMMOND. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Devon. In Newfoundland: Samuel, of Bell Island, 1709 (CO 194.4) Modern status: Scattered
HISCOCK: HISCOTT, surnames of England, diminutives of Hitch (Richard) (See RICHARDS) of from the English place name Hiscott (Devon). (Reaney, Spiegelhalter). See ALCOCK. Traced by Guppy in Berkshire, Dorset, Somerset and Wiltshire, and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: George Hiscock, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Hiscock, widespread. Hiscott, rare at Bell Island.
JACKMAN: a surname of England and Ireland - servant of jack. See JACK. Traced by Guppy in Devon, and by MacLysaght formerly in Co. Kilkenny, now in Co. Waterford. In Newfoundland: John, from Co. Kilkenny, fisherman of Bell Island, died 1810 (MUN Hist,. Royal Gazette 3rd Jan 1811) Matthew Jackman, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Peter Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Patrick Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Edward Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Matthew Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Matthew Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Jackman, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
JANES: a surname of England, a form of JOHNS. See JOHN. Traced by Guppy in Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire, Jane in Cornwall. Spiegelhalter traced Jane(s) in Devon. In Newfoundland: Philip, of Bell Island (unspecified), 1831 (DPHW 30) Modern status: Widespread
JORDAN: JORDON , surname of England, JORDAN of Ireland. On Jordan as a baptismal name, Withycombe writes: "Hebrew 'flowing down', the name of the principal river of Palestine. There was a old German personal name Jordances, probably from the same root as Old Norse jordh 'land'. Jordan is found as a christian name in England from the end of 12th century, and the probability is that it's ulitmate source was the Old German Jordances, but that its contiuned use was due to confusion with the name of the river , which would be familiar to returning Crusaders, who were in in the habit of bringing back Jordan water to be used in the baptism of their children. " (Reaney, Withycombe). Jordan was found in nine counties by Guppy, and numerous in all provinces by MacLysaght. In Newfoundland: William Jorden, of Great Belle Isle (now Bell Island), 1770 (DPHW 26C) Modern status: Scattered
JUDGE: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French juge - judge; in Ireland, as a translation of (Mac) Breheny, Mac an Bhrietheamhnaigh. (Reaney, MacLysaght). Traced by Guppy in Buckinghamshire and Kent, and by MacLysaght in Co. Sligo. In Newfoundland: William Judge, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
KAVANAGH: a surname of Ireland, " said to have been adopted from the first Kavanah having been fostered by a successor of St. Caomhan." (MacLysaght). Traced by Co. Wexford by MacLysaght. In Newfoundland: -------from Ireland, settled at Bell Island about 1840 (MUN Folklore) Edward Kavanaugh, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Robert Kavanaugh, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Kavanaugh, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Kavanagh, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Martin Kavanagh, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Kavanagh, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Kavanagh, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered.
KEARNEY: CARNEY, surnames of Ireland, (O) Kearney, O Catharaigh - warlike, or O Cearnaigh, Ir. cearnach - victorious. (MacLysaght). Traced by MacLysaght in Co. Meath where it is now often changed to FOX, in Cos. Mayo and Tipperary, and as Carney in Connacht. In Newfoundland: William, of Big Bellisle (now Bell Island), 1808 (Nfld Archives BRC) Modern status: Kearney, scattered; Carney, unique
KEHOE: a surname of England and Ireland, with variants KEO(U)GH also of Ireland; in England "from Caieu, a lost town in the vicinity of Boulongne-sur-Mer (Pas-de-Calais), " in Ireland for (Mac)Keogh, MacEochaidh, (Reaney, MacLysaght). MacLysaght traced (Mac) Keogh in Cos. Limerick, Tipperary, Roscommon, Wexford, and usually Kehoe in wicklow. Keough is the Midland form. In Newfoundland: Timothy, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1835 (Nfld. Archives BRC) James Keough, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Moses Keough, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Timothy Keough, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Arthur Keough, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Kehoe, scattered, Keough, widespread
KELLY: with a rare variant O'KELLEY, surnames of England, Ireland and Scotland; in England from the English place name Kelly (Devon), Cornish celli - wood, grove; in Ireland and Scotland for (Mac) Kelly, Mac Cealliagh or O'KELLY, O Ceallaigh, ? Ir. ceallach - strife; also in Scotland from the Scots place name Kelly (Angus, Renfrewshire) or Kellie (Fife). (Reaney, MacLysaght, Black). MacLysaght remarks that MacKelly and O'Kelly are indistinguishable now that the Mac and O have been widely dropped, though he notes that O is being to some extent resumed. Traced by Guppy in Cornwall and Devon and the Scots Border countries, and by MacLysaght from MacKelly in east Connacht and from O'Kelly throughout Ireland where it is the second commonest name. In Newfoundland: Owen, of Bell Island, 1814 (D'Alberti 24) Patrick Kelly, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Owen Kelly, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Kelley, scattered. Kelly, widespread, O'Kelly, rare at Avondale
KENNEDY: a surname of Ireland and Scotland, (O)Kennedy, O Cinneide, Ir. ceann - head, eidigh - ugly, modern Gaelic Ceannaideach. "The Scottish Kennedys are by remote origin Irish Gaels." (MacLysaght, Black). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Tipperary and Wexford, and by Guppy especially in Ayrshire, Dumfrieshire, Invernesshire and Agryleshire. In Newfoundland: William Kennedy, of Lance Cove (Bell Island), 1814 (D'Alberti 24) -----, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1827 (Nfld. Archives BRC) William Kennedy, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
KENT: a surname of England and Ireland, from the English place name Kent (Devon) or the county, or from Celtic canto -, Welsh cant - (dweller on the ) border, rim, coast. (Spiegelhalter, MacLysaght, Ekwall). Traced by Guppy in the south Midlands, by Spiegehalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght in Co. Cork. In Newfoundland: James and William, in possession of property in fishery at Bell Island, 1794-5, "born in Newfoundland" (Census 1754-5); John Kents, of Lance Cove (unspecified), 1818 (Nfld. Archives BRC) Edward Kent, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Kent, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Kent, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Terence Kent, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Kent, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Kent, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Kent, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Lance Cove and Wabana (Bell Island)
KING: a surname of England , Scotland and Ireland, from Old English Cyng, a nickname from cyn(in)g - king, or also from cyn(in)g - king, a nickname for one of kingly appearance or qualities, of for one who had acted the part of a king in a play or pageant or had been 'king' of some festivity, or had seen service in a royal household. In Ireland, King is usually an English name, but it is also widly used as an anglicized form of several names, including CONROY, by pseudo-translation. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy found King widespread in England, especially in Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Wiltshire, and Scoland, except the North. In Newfoundland: John, in possession of property in fishery at Bell Island, 1794-5, "40 years in Newfoundland" that is 1754-5 (Census 1794-5) Modern status: Widespread.
LAHEY: SEE LEAHEY
LANGLEY: a surname of England, from the English place name in sixteen countries from Northumberland to Wiltshire, or from Old English lang leah - (dweller by the) long wood or clearing. (Reaney, Cottle).Traced by Guppy in Cheshire and Sussex and by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: Richard, merchant, juror, of St. John's, 1809, with others purchased the lease of Little Bell Island in 1814, deceased 1844 (D'Alberti 19, 24 Newfoundlander 14 Mar 1844) Modern status: Unique.
LAWTON: a surname of England and Ireland from the English place name Lawton (Cheshire, Herefordshire), or from Old English hlaw-tun - (dweller at the) farm or village on the hill; also in Ireland for O Lachtnain, Ir. lachtna - grey. (Ekwall, Cottle, MacLysaght).Traced by Guppy in Cheshire and Staffordshire and by MacLysaght in Co. Cork. In Newfoundland: Family traditions: Louis (1888-1972), born in Pettigo ( Co. Donegal0, came with his parents to Harbour Grace at an early age and later settled on Bell Island (Evening Telegrame 4 Apr 1972). Modern status: At Bell Island (Electors 1955).
LEAHEY: See LAHEY, MacLysaght traced (O) Leahey in Cos. Cork, Kerry and Tipperary. In Newfoundland: Thomas Leahy fisherman, of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Lahey, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Lahey, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Michael Lahey, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Richard Lahey, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Lahey, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
LONG: a surname of Endland, Scotland and Ireland,from Old English long, lang - long , tall, the sothern and Midlands form in contrast to LANG, LAING in the north and in Scotland, though Long is also recorded in Scotland; also in Ireland for a Norman name de Long , or O Longain or O Longaigh. Traced by Guppy in the south and Midlands, especially in Wiltshire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon, and by MacLysaght especiallt in Cos. Cork and Donegal. In Newfoundland: ------, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island) 1817 (Nfld. Archives BRC) Modern status: Scattered.
MAHAR: MAHER, MEAGHER, surnames of Ireland, Meagher also of England, in Ireland, O Meachair, Ir. michair - kindly, in England from Old French megre, Latin macer - thin, lean. MacLysaght notes that Maher is now the more usual spelling of the name in Ireland. (MacLysaghter, Reaney). Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Offaly and Tipperary. In Newfoundland: Mary, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1803 (Nfld. Archives BRC) Modern status: Mahar, scattered Maher, scattered, Meagher, at Aquaforte and St John's
MARTIN: a baptismal name and surname of England, Scotland, Ireland, France, the Channell Islands and Germany and of the Micmacs of Newfoundland, in all of these from Latin Martinus, a diminutive of Martius - of Mars. St. Martin of tours (4th century), who shared his cloak with a beggar, was a favourite saint in England and France. "A very popular christian name and an early surname" (Reaney). In England, Martin is also from the English place name Martin found in 6 counties, or from Old English meretun, mxrtun - (dweller at the) homestead, village near the lake, or ? as a nickname, from marten - polecat, or the bird; in Ireland also for Gilmartin, Mac Giolla Mhartian - devotee of St. Martin; in Scotland, also ? a shortened form of St. Martin, "a once great family in East Lothian," or ? a shortened form of MacMartin, Gaelic Mac Mhartainn or Mac Mhartuinn - son of the servant of (Saint) Martin. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, Daauzat, MacLysaght, Black, Turk). Found widespread in England and the southern half of Scotland by Guppy, and "one of the most numerours surnames in Ireland" by MacLysaght. In Newfoundland: Alfred Martin, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
MERCER: a surname of England and Ireland, Old French merc(h)ier - merchant, especially a dealer in silks, velvets and other costly f abrics. (Reaney). Traced by Guppy in Kent and Lancashire, by Spiegelhalter in Devon and by MacLysaght in Cos. Antrim and Down and as Mercier in Co. Offaly and other midland counties. In Newfoundland: Charles, one of four Newfoundland inhabitants in possession of Little Belle Isle (Conception B.) 1757 (Nfld. Archives L118) Francis,of Great Belle Isle (now Bell Island), before 1797 (D'Alberti 7). Modern status: Widespread.
MIFFLEN: MIFFLIN, surnames of England of unknown origin. Traced by Kerwin in Poole (Dorset). In Newfoundland: George, granted land at Lance Cove (unspecified), 1855 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands). Modern status: Scattered.
MURPHY: a surname of Ireland and Scotland, (O) Murphy, O Murchadha, Ir. murchadh - sea-warrior, or Mac Murphy, Mac Murchada. MacLysaght notes that the "resumption of the prefixes O and Mac, which is a modern tendency with most Gaelic names, has not taken place in the case of Murphy, " that the majority of the Murphys in Ulster were probably oringinally Mac Murphy, and that Murphy is the most common name in Ireland. It occurs in Scotland from Irish immigration. (MacLysaght, Cottle). In Newfoundland: Edward Murphy, fisherman, of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Murphy, fisherman, of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Murphy, fisherman, of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Murphy, farmer, of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Murphy, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Peter Murphy, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Peter Murphy, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Patrick Murphy, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Andrew Murphy, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
NORMAN: SEE NORMORE
NORMORE: a surname of England, ? a variant of Narramore, Narrowmore or Northmore, from the English place names Narramore (Devon), Northmore (Lancashire, Oxfordshire, Somerset), or (dweller) north of the moor or (dweller on the) northern moor; but probably confused with NORMAN in some early instances in Newfoundland. Spiegelhalter traced Narramore and Northmore, Guppy Northmore in Devon. In Newfoundland: Gregory, from Jersey (Channel Islands), settled at Bell Island about 1740, died about 1785 MUN Hist.). Catherine Normore, in possession of property, Bell Island, 1794-5,"born in Newfoundland" (Census 1794-5); Gregory Norman , of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1813 (DPHW 26B). Edward Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) James Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Henry Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Francis Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) William Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Gregory Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) James Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Normore, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Bell Island (Electors 1955).
OATES: a surname of England and Ireland, from an Old German personal name Odo,Otto, Old French Odes, Otes - riches; in Ireland "a synonym by pseudo-translation of Quirke" (See QUIRK), Ir. coirce - oats. (Reaney Origin, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Oat(e)s in Cornwall; Spiegelhalter traced Oates in Devon. In Newfoundland: Annie Oats, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island) 1817 (Nfld. Archives BRC). Modern status: Scattered.
PARSONS: a surname of England and Ireland - the parson's servant, or one who lived or worked at the Parson's (house); in Ireland also for Mac an Phearsain (MACPHERSON in Scotland). See also WILLIAMS. Guppy found Parsons widespread in the south of England especially in Wilshire. In Newfoundland: Edward Parsons, fisherman of Bell Isle (now Bell Island) and Lance Cove, (Lovell's Directory) John Parsons, fisherman of Bell Isle (now Bell Island) and Lance Cove, (Lovell's Directory) Joseph Parsons, fisherman of Bell Isle (now Bell Island) and Lance Cove, (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread throughout NF especially at Parsonsville (Bell Island)
PEARL: a surname of England from Old French perle - (dealer in) pearl(s). (Reaney). In Newfoundland: Thomas Penril, fisherman of Bell Isle (now Bell Island) and Lance Cove, (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Parrell, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Parrell, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Rare, at Bell Island.
PIPPY: a surname of England, ? a variant of Pippet - ? a diminutive of Philip (See PHILIPS) or Pep(p)in, Pepys, or of Pepin, Pepsi, Peppy or Pipet or Jersey (Channel Islands), from the Old French personal name Pepin, or from Old French pepin, pipin - seedof a fleshy fruit, used for a gardener. (Reaney, Cottle, Turk). Spiegelhalter traced Pippet in Devon. In Newfoundland: Joseph Peppy, carpenter of Bell Island, 1794-5, "born in Newfoundland" (Census 1794-5); Modern status: Scattered
PITT(S): surnames of England from Old English pytt - (dweller by the ) pit(s), excavation(s) or hollow(s), or from the English place names Pit(t) of which Spiegelhalter recorded 22 in Devon, Pitt (Hampshire) or Pett (Kent). (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter). See also Putt. Guppy traced Pitt in Gloucestershire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire, Pitts in Devon and Norfolk; Spiegelhalter traced Pitt(s) in Devon. In Newfoundland: James Pitts, born at Kennford (Devon), of Lance Cove, Bell Island, died 1805, aged 70 (MUN Hist.) James Pitts, planter of Bell Island, 1794-5, "43 years in Newfoundland" that is, since 1751-2 (Census 1794) William Pitts, ferryman of Lance Cove (Conception B.) (1864-65 Hutchingsons Directory) John Pitts, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Pitt rare, Pitts, at Bell Island
POWER: a surname of England and Ireland, from Old French Pohier - the man from Poix (Picardy), or from Old French povre, poure - poor, or ? from Old French poer - one (em)power(ed) to do something, a herald. MacLysaght notes that the de in the Irish form de Paor should be le, - the poor man, consequent on a vow, POWERS - son of Power appears to be rare. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy traced the variant Poore in Hampshire; Spiegelhalter traced Poore and Power in Devon; MacLysaght traced Power mainly in Waterford and adaccent counties, among the fifty most numerous Irish names. In Newfoundland: John, butcher of Bell Island, 1794-5, "40 years in Newfoundland", that is, 1754-5 (Census 1794-5) Edward Power, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Power, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Michael Power, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Power, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Edward Power, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Power, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Michael Power, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Matthew Power, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Power widespread, Powers rare, Poor rare
QUIGLEY: a surname of Ireland (O)Quigley, O Coigligh, ? Ir. coigeal- one with unkempt hair. (MacLysaght). MacLysaght found (O) Quigley dispersed throughout Ireland but most numerous in Cos. Donegal and Derry. In Newfoundland: Peter Quigley, farmer of Belle Isle (now Bell Island) and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Peter Quigley, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered
REDMOND: a surname of Ireland, a variant of RAYMOND. (MacLysaght). See also REDMAN. Traced by MacLysaght especially in South Wexford. In Newfoundland: Patrick, of Belle Isle (now Bell Island) and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Patrick Redmond, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: At Avondale South (Electors 1955)
REES(E): surnames of Wales and England, from the Old Welch personal name Ris, Welsh Rhys - ardour. (Reaney, Cottle). See also PRICE, RICE. Guppy traced Rees in herefordshire, Monmouthshire, North Wales and especially South Wales. Spiegelhalter traced Reese in Devon. In Newfoundland: George Rees (of Welsh ancestry) (1772 -), born at Bristol, England, came as shipwright to work at shipyards at Lance Cove (Bell Island) in 1797 (MUN Hist.) George Rees or Reece, of Belle Isle (now Bell Island) 1818, of Lance Cove (Bell Island). Alfred Reece, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) George Reece, jun., fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) John Reece, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Solomon Reece, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Reece, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) William Reece, jun., fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Rees, scattered, especially at Bell Island. Reese, rare
REEVE(S): surnames of England, Reeves of Ireland, Reeve from Old English (ge) refa - reeve, sheriff, chief magistrate, bailiff, overseer, Reeves - servant, ? son, (dweller at the house) of the reeve, or from Old English efee - (dweller at the ) edge (of the wood or hill); in Ireland also formerly for O Rimheadha. (Reaney Cottle, MacLysaght). See also LAWRENCE. Guppy traced Reeve in Essex, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Suffolk, Sussex and Wiltshire, Reeves in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire,Derbyshire, Devon, Hampshire, Kent, Northamptonshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, and Wiltshire. In Newfoundland: William Reave(s), of Bell Island, 1708-09 (CO 194.4) Modern status: Reeve, rare, at Bell Island (Electors 1955) and St. John's Reeves, scattered
RICE: a surname of Wales, England and Ireland, from the Old Welsh personal name Ris, Welsh Rhys - ardour; in Ireland also a puzzling anglicization of O Maolchraoibhe, Ir. craobh - branch, (Reaney, MacLysaght). See also PRICE, REES(E), Traced by Guppy in Devon and Norfolk, and by MacLysaght in Munster and Armagh, Monaghan and neighbouring countries. In Newfoundland: George Rice, fisherman, of Bell Island and LanceCove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Rice,fisherman, of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread
ROBERTS: a surname of England, Wales and Ireland from the baptismal name Robert, from the Old German personal name Hrodebert, Old English Hreodbeorht, Old French Ro(d)bert, containing the elements fame and bright. Robert, introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest, and its pet-forms and diminutives Rob(in), Hob, Dob, Nob and later Bob, have been the source of many surnames including ROBERTS(ON),ROBBINS ROB(IN)SON, HOBBS, BOBBETT,PROBERT, HOPKINS, DOBBIN, DOBSON, RABBIT(T)S and ? DIBBON. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle). See also ROPSON. Found widespread by Guppy in the south and Midlands and especially in North Wales; and by MacLysaght in all provinces though rare in Connacht. In Newfoundland: Nathaniel Roberts, fisherman, of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Widespread.
ROFF: surnames of England, Rolfe of Ireland, a few of twenty ix variants, of German origin, especially in the Old Norse for Hrolfr, in Old French Roul, often latinized as Rollo, containing the elements fame and wolf. These have been confused both in England and Ireland with RALPH. (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). See ROLFE., ROLLS and also R(H)EULOKKE. Guppy Traced ROFE in Kent, ROFFE in Hertfordshire, ROOFE in Norfolk and ROLFE in Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Norfolk and Suffolk. In Newfoundland: John Rough, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: Especially at Bonavista.
SEARLE: a surname of England from the Old German personal names Sarilo, Serila, in Norman-French Serlo, ? related to Old English searu - armour. "The name was frequent in Normandy and common in England after the Conquest." (Reaney). See also EARLE. Guppy traced Searle in Cambridgeshire, Cornwall and Devon. Searles traced in Cornwall. In Newfoundland: Family tradition, ------, from Cornwall, settled at Bell Island in 1750 (MUN Folklore). John Searle, from the west Country of England, of Little Bell Island, the other settled at Portugal Cove where the name was changed to Earle (MUN Hist.). Thomas Sarell, teacher of Lance Cove (Bell Island), 1839 (Newfoundland 1 Aug 1839) James Searel, farmer of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Benjamin Searle, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: At Bell Island, and in the Harbour Main district.
SIMPSON: a surname of England, Scotland and Ireland - son of Simon (See SIMON) or from the English place name Simpson (Devon). (Reaney, Spiegelhalter, Black, MacLysaght). Found widespread by Guppy in England and Scotland except north of Aberdeen, and by MacLysaght in Ulster. In Newfoundland: Andrew, of Great Bellisle (now Bell Island), 1771 (DPHW 26C) Modern status: At St. John's and Long Pond (Harbour Main district)
SKANES: a surname of England, ? of Scandinavian origin, but probably confused with the surname of Ireland (Mac) Skehan (See SKEHANS). Matthews traced Skains, Scaianes in Devon. In Newfoundland: ------, from Cornwall, England, settled at Bell Island about 1750 (MUN Folklore) John Scanes or Skaines, of Belle Isle (now Bell Island), 1822 (DPHW 26B) Thomas Skehan, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Thomas Skehan, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Henry Skehan, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Reuben Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Daniel Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Solomon Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Thomas Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Edward Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Robert Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Joseph Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Henry Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Henry Skeanes, Jr., fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) John Skeanes, fisherman of Belle Isle, 1894-97 (McAlpine's Directory) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Bell Island
SNOW: a surname of England and Ireland from Old English *snaw - (one with) snow (-white hair), or born or baptized at a time of great snow. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght 73). Traced by Guppy in Devon, Essex and Straffordshire. In Newfoundland: Early instances, John, of Kelly's Island, 1708-9 (CO 194.4) Modern status: Widespread
SOMMERS: SUMMERS, surnames of England and Ireland, ? from Old French somier - sumpter, packhorse man, muleteer; also in Ireland in Connacht for (O) Somahan, O Somachian, Ir. somachan - soft, innocent person, in Ulster occasionally a synonym of MacGovern, Mag Shamhrain, Ir. samhradh - summer. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght). Guppy traced Somers in Somerset, Summers in Devon, Gloucestershire, Northumberland and Somerset; MacLysaght traced Somers, Summers in Leinster, Connacht and Ulster. In Newfoundland: Agnes ? Sumers, of Belle Isle (now Bell Island), 1813 (Nfld. Archives BRC) Modern status: Somers, scattered. Sommers, at Victoria and Buckans. Summers, scattered.
SPARK(E)S: surnames of England from Old Norse sparkr, sprxk - lively, sprightly, or ? Old English spearca - spark, small portion, or ? the Old English personal name Spearh(e)afoc - sparrowhawk. (Reaney, Cottle, Spiegelhalter). Guppy traced Sparkes in Sussex, Sparks in Devon and Somerset; Spiegelhalter traced Spark(e)s in Devon. In Newfoundland: Family tradition, George Sparkes, from England, settled at Lance Cove (Bell Island) in the early 1800s (MUN Hist.) William Sparks, fisherman of Bell Island and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: scattered
SQUIRE(S): surnames of England from Old French escuyer, Middle English squyer - shield-bearer, esquier, a young gentelmen attending a knight. (Reaney, Cottle). See also SWYERS. Traced by Guppy in Bedfordshire, Devon, Leicestershire, Ruthlandshire and Nottinghamshire, with Squires "far the least frequent, occurring in Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire." In Newfoundland: Benjamin Squire, of Great Belle Isle (now Bell Island), 1790 (DPHW 26C) Modern status: Squires, widespread.
STARES: ? a variant of England SREAR, Steer(e)(s), from Old English steor - (one like, or a keeper of the) steer(s), young ox(en). (Reaney, Cottle). Guppy traced Stares in Hampshire; Spiegelhalter traced Stear, Steer(e) in Devon. In Newfoundland: John Steer, granted land at Upper Long Pond, 1863 (Nfld. Archives, Registry Crown Lands) Modern status: Stares, at Bell Island.
STEPHENS: STEVENS, surnames of England and Wales, STEPHENS of Ireland and Guernsey (Channel Islands), Stephen and Steven of Scotland, and Stephen of the Micmac Indians of Newfoundland, from the baptismal name Stephen from the Greek personal name - crown, wreath, garland, borne by the first Christian martyr, occurring in England only as a monk's name before the Norman Conqust but soon afterwards a common baptismal name. In Ireland it may also be an anglicization of Mac Giolla Stiofain - devotee of St. Stephen. Surnames derived from it include STEEVES, STEPHENS(ON), STEVENS(ON). (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, Black, MacLysaght, Turk). Guppy found Stephens and Stevens widespread in the Midlands and south and west England, with Stephens very numerous in Corwall, the Welsh Border counties and South Wales, and Stevens well-distributed throughout the area but best represented in the south and east. He also traced Stephen in Aberdeenshire, though Black found Stevens less common than Steven or Stephen. In Newfoundland: William, in fishery at Bell Island 1794-5, "26 years in Newfoundland", That is, 1768-9 (Censsus 1794-5) Anne, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1809 (Nfld. Archives, BRC) Modern status: Stephens, At St. John's
STONE: a surname of England, Ireland and Guernsey (Channel Island) from the English place name Stone (Staffordshire, Devon (22), Worcestershire etc.) or (dweller by or among the) stone(s) or rock(s); in Ireland also a synonym of Clogherty and Mulclohy, Ir. cloch - stone. (Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). Traced by Guppy in the southwest and southeast of England and in Derbyshire, and by MacLysaght, but nowhere numerous, in Ireland. In Newfoundland: John, of Big Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1824 (MUN Hist.) Modern status: scattered
STOYLES: a surname of England from Old French estoile, Middle English stoyle - star, or ? from an unidentified place name, or ? a variant of STYLES. (Reaney , Spiegelhalter). Traced by Spiegelhalter in Devon. In Newfoundland: Family tradition, William Stoyles or Stiles (about 1800-1882), from Devon, settled at Lance Cove Bell Island), in 1832 (MUN Hist.) William Stiles, fisherman of Belle Isle and Lance Cove, 1871 (Lovell's Directory) Modern status: scattered
SWEENEY: a surname of Ireland, (Mac) Sweeney, Mac Suibhne, Ir. suibhne - pleasant. (MacLysaght). See SWAIN. Traced by MacLysaght in Cos. Donegal, Cork and Kerry. In Newfoundland: James Sweeny, farmer of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1814, came to Bell Isle from Ireland 10 or 11 years previously, that is, 1804-5 (D'Alberti 24) Modern status: Scattered, especially at Bell Island.
THISTLE: a surname of England - dweller near the thistles, or a Newfoundland variant of the surname of France and Jersey (Channel Islands) TOUZEL, from a nickname - young man with hair cut short. (Dauzat, Turk). In Newfoundland: Henery [sic] Thisle, of Bell Island, 1708-09 (CO 194.4) Modern status: Scattered
WALTERS: WALTERS, surnames of England, Wales and the Channel Islands, (Mac) Walter of Ireland, from the Old German personal names Walter or Waldhar containing the elements mighty and army, introduced into England in the regin of Edward the Confessor and very popular after the Norman Conquest, giving the surnames WALTER(S), WATERS, WATKINS, WATSON, WATT(S). (Withycombe, Reaney, Cottle, MacLysaght, Turk). Guppy traced Walter in Devon, Kent, Lincolnshire, Oxfordshire, Somerset and Sussex, Walter in Devon, Monmouthshire, Straffordshire and South Wales. In Newfoundland: Mary Walters, school teacher of Lance Cove (Conception Bay), 1864-65 (Hutchingsons Directory) Modern status: Walter, unique. Walters, scattered.
WATERMAN: a surname of England - servant of Walter (see WALTER), or water-bearer, water-carrier, boatman (Reaney, Cottle). Traced by Guppy in Kent, and in Hampshire. In Newfoundland: Joseph Watterman, of Bell Isle (now Bell Island), 1681 (CO 1) Modern status: Scattered
WHITE: WHYTE, surnames of England, Scotland and Ireland, White of Channel Islands from the Old English personal name Hwita, a shortened form of names brgining with Hwit - , or a nickname from Old English hwit - white, fair (of complextion or hair), or from Old English *with - (dweller by the) bend, curve (in a river or road), or from Norman French waite - lookout, place to watch from, or by confusion with WIGHT; also in Scotland an anglicization of the Gaelic M'Illebhain (MacGhillebhain); in Ireland also for such names as Bane, Bawn, Galligan, Kilbane, by translation or Ir. ban - white, geal - white. (Reaney , Cottle, Black, MacLysaght, Turk). See also WHITT, LEBLANC. Guppy found White widespread in England, White and Whyte south or the Forth and Clyde; MacLysaght found White numerous in every province since the 14th century and especially in Cos. Down and Sligo. In Newfoundland: James, in possession of property in fishery at Bell Island, 1794-5, "25 years in Newfoundland", that is, 1769-70 (Census 1794-5) Modern status: White, widespread in all districts.

 

 

TRANSCRIBED AND PROVIDED BY:Barbara McGrath (June 2000)

Page Revised: February 2004 (Don Tate)

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