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Blacksmith Bids for Fortune

 

Pat Roach Invents Three-In-One Horseshoe Suitable for Use
"Any Time, Any Place and Anywhere"

Supports Family 9

TOPSAIL, May 5Pat Roach, well-known blacksmith here whose forge is visited by all horse-owners "up the shore" has invented a three-in-one shoe which may bring its inventor a measure of fame and fortune.

Two years ago, this Topsail smithy fashioned a "non-skid attachment" for horseshoes which was later successfully patented in Canada. The new invention, also patented and arousing considerable attention among horse dealers and manufacturers, incorporates the original feature and has in addition two other unique improvements.

The inventor of "The Roach Horseshoe" is very proud of his creation, and is quietly waiting for that day when a suitable offer will be made him for manufacturing rights. Ordinary trade in the forge is often slow and he has a family of nine children to support. In his three-in-one horseshoe, on which he has laboured many months, he places his hopes for a more prosperous future.

His sky-blue eyes sparkled and twinkled as he explained his invention to this writer. The signed, sealed and delivered patent was delivered for examination. A demonstration with the actual horseshoe was given. Blacksmith Roach displayed great faith and optimism in his unique invention. And having seen and read all, it is easy to believe that he's really got something there.

3 Sets of Attachments

The Roach Horseshoe comprises three sets of attachable units, making: (1. a non-skid, silent rubber shoe; (2) a sharpened shoe for winter driving; (3) a summer calk shoe. These all-sufficient units give the Roach Horseshoe the three-fold advantage of suitability "any time, any place, anywhere."

In common usage, a horse would have to be fitted with a special shoe to act as the base for the attachable units. This shoe, however, would not have to be replaced during the horse's lifetime. The three units that Blacksmith Roach has devised are capable of secure fitting to this shoe, each unit individually or part units, as and when required.

Each unit consists of three parts and these are attached by means of dovetail slots on the shoe-base. The tightening of a single screw near each unit keeps the attachments firmly in their place. All fittings can be readily replaced when worn without removing the shoe from the horse's hoof.

Non-Skid Rubber Shoe

The idea of the non-skid, silent rubber shoe is to provide the horse with a set of units which will eliminate discomfort and slipping on tarred pavements; and at the same time reduce to a great extent traffic noises in city streets. The sharpened shoe for winter driving will keep the horse on its feet when the roadbed is icy and slippery. The summer calk shoe is intended to be the ideal thing for horses on gravel roads or in pasture.

One great advantage that the Roach Horseshoe has over the ordinary shoe is that its use will remove the necessity of visiting the blacksmith's shop every time a change of season demands a change of horseshoe. When the invention comes into common practice, horse owners will be able to place the units in the cart-box and change over on the road anywhere if the necessity arises. Hammer, screwdriver and five minutes is (sic) all that is required.

Other points about the Roach Horseshoe are that the non-skid, silent rubber shoe will not draw the horse's any more than the common iron shoe; the rubber plates of this attachment are adjustable to fit any shoe; the units are compact and can be carried around with the minimum of bother. The inventor of this unique outfit thinks that the sets would not be very expensive. They would be sold over the shop counter as well as at the blacksmith's forge.

When Pat Roach's dream comes true and this horseshoe he has invented is in common use everywhere, his brethren of the anvil may find the horseshoeing trade a bit slack. But be that as it may, the great army of farmers and peddlers who still cling to the horseless carriage will thank him for giving them the three-in-one horseshoe. Certainly, the horses, in their own way, will bless him.

Pat Roach

Caption with Photo: Recent snap of Pat Roach standing in front of his forge. He is holding his precious invention "The Roach Horseshoe."

(Page 12 - Daily News??? - this was circa 1940 because he had 10 children surviving out of 12, but my father had enlisted at age 17 in the Royal Navy and was overseas - thus the reference to 9.)

 

 

Page Contributed by Jim Roache

Page Revised by Ivy F. Benoit (Wednesday March 06, 2013)

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