Register  *  Login  *  Forum  *  FAQ   

Board index » Genealogy » Genealogy Hints & Tips




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: My family
 Post Posted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 6:38 pm 
Offline
New Member
New Member

Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2014 3:01 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Reading,Ma.
Looking for some information on my family. My grandfather was Michael J. Peddle, 6/18/1885-4/1969. I think he was born in St Mary's and died in Everett, MA. His father was James Peddle and his mother was Elizabeth Butt. My grandmother was Annie M. Obrien, 1882-1883-1967. I think she was born in Placentia Bay and died in Malden,Ma. Her father was Bartholemew Obrien and her mother was Mary Hickey. I was told that Mary died giving birth to my grandmother Annie. I was also told that Annie had two older brothers that moved out to western Canada. I was also told that my grandfather had at least one sisfer that married into the Lee family of River head. Any help would be great Thanks, Ed Peddle


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 2:34 am 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
Edward, the records suggest your grandmother, Annie M. O'Brien, had an earlier marriage.

Annie M. O'Brien married Michael J. Gleeson, son of Patrick Gleeson and Margaret Burns, on June 7, 1904, in Massachusetts.

Annie M. (O'Brien) Gleeson, widow, married Michael J. Peddle, son of James Peddle and Elizabeth Butt, on August 13, 1911, in Massachusetts.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 3:11 am 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
Bartholemew O'Brien of Holyrood, and Mary Hickey of Holyrood, were married at the Roman Catholic Parish of St. Peter and St. Paul, Harbour Main, Conception Bay, NL., on January 16, 1864, by Reverend Kryan Walsh.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:38 pm 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
Massachusetts Marriages:
Name: Michael J. Gleeson
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 07 Jun 1904
Event Place: Everett, Massachusetts
Gender: Male
Age: 29
Birthplace: Ireland
Birth Year (Estimated): 1875
Father's Name: Patrick Gleeson
Mother's Name: Margaret Burns
Spouse's Name: Annie M. O'Brien
Spouse's Marital Status: Single
Spouse's Father's Name: Bartholomew O'Brien
Spouse's Mother's Name: Mary Hickey
Spouse's Mother's Titles and Terms:
Certificate Number: 95
GS Film number: 2057590
Digital Folder Number: 4332431
Image Number: 00407


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:41 pm 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
Massachusetts Marriages:
Name: Michael Peddle
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 13 Aug 1911
Event Place: Everett, Massachusetts
Gender: Male
Age: 26
Birth Date: 1885
Birthplace: Newfoundland
Registration Place: Everett, Massachusetts
Birth Year (Estimated): 1885
Father's Name: James Peddle
Mother's Name: Elizabeth Butt
Spouse's Name: Annie Gleason
Spouse's Marital Status: Widowed
Spouse's Father's Name: Bartholomew O'Brien
Spouse's Mother's Name: Mary Hickey
Certificate Number: 8234
GS Film number: 2315512
Digital Folder Number: 4329363
Image Number: 00538
Number of Images: 1


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:45 pm 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
United States Census, 1920:
Name: Michael Peddle
Event Type: Census
Event Year: 1920
Event Place: Everett Ward 1, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
District: 119
Gender: Male
Age: 33
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Can Read: Yes
Can Write: Yes
Relationship to Head of Household: Head
Own or Rent: Rent
Birth Year (Estimated): 1887
Birthplace: Canada
Immigration Year: 1907
Father's Birthplace: Canada
Mother's Birthplace: Canada
Sheet Number and Letter: 13B
Household ID: 277
Line Number: 64
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: T625
GS Film number: 1820709
Digital Folder Number: 004301106
Image Number: 00575
Household Gender Age Birthplace
Head, Michael Peddle, M, 33, born Canada.
Wife, Annie Peddle, F, 38, born Canada.
Daughter, Margaret Gleason, F, 14, born Massachusetts.
Daughter, Mary Gleason, F, 11, born Massachusetts.
Daughter, Mildred Gleason, F, 8, born Massachusetts.
Son, James Gleason, M, 7, born Massachusetts.
Daughter, Ethel Gleason, F, 3, born Massachusetts.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:53 pm 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
United States Census, 1940:
Name: Michael J. Peddle
Event Type: Census
Event Date: 1940
Event Place: Ward 6, Everett, Everett City, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 54
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Relationship to Head of Household: Head
Birthplace: Canada
Birth Year (Estimated): 1886
Last Place of Residence: Same House
District: 9-152
Family Number: 214
Sheet Number and Letter: 11B
Line Number: 44
Affiliate Publication Number: T627
Affiliate Film Number: 1605
Digital Folder Number: 005460877
Image Number: 00466
Household Gender Age Birthplace
Head, Michael J. Peddle, M, 54, born Canada.
Wife, Annie Peddle, F, 59, born Canada.
Daughter, Mary Peddle, F, 32, born Massachusetts.
Daughter, Mildred Peddle, F, 29, born Massachusetts.
Son, James Peddle, M, 27, born Massachusetts.
Daughter, Ethel Peddle, F, 23, born Massachusetts.
Son, Edward Peddle, M, 18, born Massachusetts.


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 2:06 pm 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
Canada Marriages:
Name: Martin O'Brien
Birth Date: 1889
Birthplace: Holyrood, Nfld.
Age: 23
Spouse's Name: Annie Healy
Spouse's Birth Date: 1889
Spouse's Birthplace: Holyrood, Nfld.
Spouse's Age: 23
Event Date: 26 Jun 1912
Event Place: North Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
Father's Name: Bartholemew
Mother's Name: Mary
Spouse's Father's Name: Martin
Spouse's Mother's Name: Elizabeth
Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M7240-8
System Origin: Canada-VR
GS Film number: 1298865
Reference ID: 2:3QXBDKG


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 11:31 pm 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
Will of Elizabeth Peddle, from Newfoundland will books, volume 10, page 287, probate year 1914.

In re: Elizabeth Peddle, deceased.
This is the last will and testament of me, Elizabeth Peddle, widow of the late James Peddle, of St. Mary’s, St. Mary’s Bay.
1st., I give and bequeath to my son James Butt my bed, bedding and bedstead, also ground to build a house on, should he require it.
2nd., I give and bequeath to my son Andrew Peddle my house, cellar and stable and all that is in the house, but my daughter Elizabeth Peddle is to have a home in the house while she remains single.
3rd., I give and bequeath to my sons Andrew and Michael all the ground to be divided equally but should Elizabeth Peddle require ground to build a house on she is to get it.
4th., I give and bequeath to Michael Peddle the barn attached to the stable.
Elizabeth (her X mark) Peddle
Witnesses: Robert Yetman, James D. Burke, St. Mary’s, Sept. 19 1911. Signed by Elizabeth Peddle in our presence for her last will having been first read over and explained to her James D. Burke, Robert Yetman.
(Listed in the margin next to this will the following):
Fiat
Decr 14/14
C.J.
Admn c.t.a.
Decr 15/14
granted to
Lilian Benson
Sureties:
Jos. Fagan
John Walsh
Estate sworn
at $300.00


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:10 am 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
United States World War I Draft Registration Cards:
Name: Michael John Peddle
Event Type: Draft Registration
Event Date: 1917-1918
Event Place: Everett City, Massachusetts, United States
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 18 Jun 1885
Birthplace: St. Mary's, Newfoundland, Canada
Nationality: Great Britain
Affiliate Publication Title: World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards
Affiliate Publication Number: M1509
GS Film number: 1685173
Digital Folder Number: 005217810
Image Number: 00506


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:18 am 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
The following article was published in the 'Newfoundland Express' Newspaper, May 1, 1875 edition.
(Express published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at the Express Office, opposite the Commercial Rooms, Duckworth Street, St. John's, Newfoundland, James Seaton, Editor and Proprietor).

May 1, 1875
"Fishermen frozen to death.
A story of terrible suffering and exposure.
Lengthened details have now been received in relation to the terrible experience of a party of fishermen from St. Mary’s, Newfoundland, who were cast away on an ice-floe. The crew originally consisted of thirty four men, of whom seven perished, and the particulars of the sufferings experienced given below are from the lips of one of the survivors, ten of whom were landed at Baltimore yesterday morning, having been taken by the steamship "Nurnberg", Captain Jaeger, from the schooner "George S. Fogg" off the Banks of Newfoundland.
The ice (says Andrew Mooney, one of the survivors) had been firm all the winter, and some of the villagers had frequently gone out upon it to hunt sea-birds. It had shown no signs of starting before that fatal day. Reports had been received from the headlands that a vessel had been seen drifting about, and on the 2nd of March the brig was discovered two and a half miles from the shore fast in the ice. The party of thirty-four all men but James Grace, was quickly gathered, and they started out on the ice to her and spent the day on board. Toward evening they started homeward, but had travelled far when the terrible fact was presented to them that the ice had parted between them and the shore, and the opening was increasing every moment. Consternation seized upon them as they hastened forward, and each threw away his heavy outer clothing as he ran to be encumbered as little as possible. When the brink of the ice was reached the space of water between them and the shore was half a mile wide, the ice having broken one mile from the land, and the immense field upon which they stood was floating steadily out to sea.
It was now quite dark. The party were exhausted and but half clad, and they prepared for the terrible cold which soon set in. At first it rained till they were all wet to the skin. The rain then turned to sleet and snow. The wind veered to the northward, and cold became intense, the fierce blasts of wind cutting them to the bone. Then came the struggle for life, the men stamping their feet and running madly about the more sturdy encouraging the weak and faltering. The cold still increased, until, as Mooney says, it reached a degree of intensity not equalled before in that latitude this winter. At midnight the cold and exhaustion began to tell upon the doomed ones in the little party. First one and then another of them would lie down, saying he could go not further. The others would pick them up and try to keep them on their feet, but after reeling for a short distance, like drunken men, they would fall senseless upon the ice and die without a struggle. Those who were able to keep their feet had enough to do to keep themselves from falling into the fatal lethargy, and with sad hearts each victim was left to his fate.
When morning dawned seven corpses were counted upon the ice, and of the remainder, none could tell who was to be the next victim. A piece of ice twenty feet square, floated near the brink of the ice in the open water, upon which nine of them got, hoping that it would float towards the shore ice, and they could thus save themselves. When it has floated 800 yards from the ice upon which their comrades stood it grounded, and the unfortunates remained upon it for three days and three nights, during which time six of them died, the other three being those picked up the schooner "George S. Fogg", on the 6th. of March. All the food they had in that time was a small white fish, which was frozen in the ice. This they divided between them. Of the three men, two are on the "Nurnberg", viz. John Fuer, in the ship’s hospital, badly frozen, and JAMES PEDDLE. The eighteen men remaining after the nine floated upon the smaller ice-field, made their way back to the abandoned brig, which was tightly jammed in the ice and was carried with it. All expected to die in her, and some of them had lost their senses before reaching her a second time. The fishermen could not read her name, but knew she was not English. The crew had left on the ice for Hollyrood, a village near St. Mary’s on the 1st of March. The brig moved with the ice for a week in sight of land, and the fishermen were on her ten days. To a question as to how the news would be received in St. Mary’s, Mooney replied: - "There is now mourning in every household, for they do not know any of us are saved." He said he had six children, and that some of those who had died have families equally large.
The ten rescued fisherman of St. Mary’s, Newfoundland., were taken in charge by the British Consul yesterday morning. They will be put on board the British steamer "Caspain", which sails for Halifax on Thursday morning next. They are in good condition apparently recovered from their sufferings on the ice. When the men were transferred from the schooner "George S. Fogg" to the "Nurnburg, the following note was received by Captain Jaegar from Captain Spence, of the "Fogg": "These are the ten men I picked up on the ice about seventy miles from the land. They report to belong to St. Mary’s Bay. They were nearly starved when I got them on the 11th March. I had twenty-one on board at first, and am getting short of water and food. I put eleven on board two vessels on the 18th inst." - N.Y. Witness, March 31.
A telegram on Wednesday last announced the death at Liverpool of Richard O'Dwyer, Esq., merchant, formerly of this place, and member of the Legislative Council.
We are glad to note that the St. Mary's men, ten in number, who were some time since taken to Baltimore, have been sent on by the Allan steamers, free of charge, by the kind direction of sir Hugh Allan."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 12:23 am 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
The 1875 St. Mary’s Disaster.
The St. John's 'Public Ledger' Newspaper, March 4, 1875, carried the following report from Salmonier, St. Mary’s Bay:
Names of the men lost at St. Mary’s.
…"Nearly all the men of St. Mary’s left the shore on Tuesday morning to board an abandoned vessel jammed in the ice about two miles west of Cape English; the ice slacked off in the evening and she was driven out to sea with the wind east-north-east, frozen in a large sheet. All succeeded in getting on shore with the exception of 42 men, a certainty 20 of them drowned and died on the ice in the storm; hope of the other 22 being on the vessel; nothing wrong with the hull or material but no compass and little provisions. She is a French vessel named La Violette; Girardville Master, from France bound to St. Pierre; cargo rum, salt, sugar and coffee. All her crew safe at Holyrood (St. Vincent’s). Captain dangerously ill.
The following men are known to be lost: John Power, James Peddle, Pat Tobin, Thomas Bowen and son, James Barry, John Barry, Thomas Barry, William Reuben, John Fewer, George Rousell and son, Mike Vail and son, Peter Grace, Joseph Grace, Richard Critch, Pat Dobbin.
The following day March 5th 1875 a further telegram from Salmonier to Hon. Ambrose Shea gave a list of the missing men as follows:
Michael Power, Michael Barry, Thomas Hayes, Thomas Mooney, Andrew Mooney, Michael Tobin, James Tobin, Pat Tobin, Robert Tobin, John Mulloy, Ed Nolan, Dan White, Richard Connors, James Fagan and two sons, Thomas Murray and two sons.
These reports were the first indication to the world of an ongoing tragedy for the St. Mary’s, St. Vincent’s and area population. The chain of events leading to this disaster had started with a report to the magistrate of St. Mary’s on March 1st 1875 that a ship was stuck in the ice about two miles off Cape English and was being abandoned by her crew. The magistrate proceeded to St. Vincent’s (which was then known as Holyrood) to investigate the report and found that a large number of local residents were already gathered on the beach with the intention of boarding the vessel to secure her cargo. The mate and crew of the vessel which they identified as The Violette had managed with some difficulty to cross the ice and make it to land. The mate informed the magistrate and the local residents that the Captain of the ship was too ill to even attempt the journey over the ice. Several men from St. Vincent’s on hearing this volunteered to go aboard the ship and bring the captain to safety. The men gathered on the beach would wait for the captain to be brought ashore before boarding the abandoned vessel.
James Burke the local constable residing in St. Mary’s was summoned to St. Vincent’s by the magistrate who was concerned that there might be trouble. Burke arrived just after noon as the men were bringing the Captain ashore. Michael MacCarty in his story of this event stated that “he was so weak and ill the men had to take turns carrying him on their backs, but they managed to get him ashore. Patrick Stamp, a resident Vincent’s took the captain to his house and gave him every care and attention. The Captain was so weak he couldn’t even sit up but had to be carried to Stamp’s house on a slide.”
It was mid afternoon by the time the captain had been brought safely ashore and the weather conditions were giving indications of a storm brewing. The men on the beach, in spite of this, decided to carry out their plans to board the vessel. At the subsequent hearing into the disaster, one of the participants Michael Hines testified that the men did not go as a large single group but in parties of two or three men. It was rough going over the ice but Hines’ testimony was that they all succeeded in getting aboard the Viollette. They were successful in off loading most of the cargo of salt, sugar, coffee and rum. When they decided to head back to shore, they discovered that the wind had now swung around to the east-north-east and the ice had now moved off shore and there was a large patch of open water between them and the shore. It was now getting late in the afternoon and the threatened storm broke in full fury. There was no option left to the group but to try to get back to the Violette. It was quickly obvious that this would not be as simple as it was when they originally boarded the vessel. The wind had begun driving the ice-pan and the vessel out to sea.
As the men tried to gather together in larger groups, some of them fell into the icy waters and were drowned as they attempted to jump from the smaller to the larger ice pans. Eventually they managed to gather into two parties on separate pans of ice. They were now desperate to save themselves from the breaking ice pans and the fierce storm. They spent a cold and hungry night on the ice trying to shelter themselves behind a large ice bolder. The next day seventeen of the men in one party managed to get back on board the Violette. The remaining ten men in the other party continued to drift away on their ice pan. Some of these men had fallen into the ocean while attempting to get from the smaller ice pan to the larger one and were in a desperate condition dressed in wet frozen clothes and with continuing high winds, drifting snow and temperatures dipping well below the freezing point. One of the survivors Jimmy (James) Barry related to my father in later years that John Power my father’s grandfather who was then sixty years of age had fallen into the water and had died the first night. Just before dawn Michael Vail and James Whelan died from the cold and exhaustion. Later in the day Thomas Boland died. The survivors huddled together waiting for rescue. After another day their conditions worsened and George Rousell and his son died as did Mike Vail’s son. The weather finally cleared so that they could see Cape Pine in the distance. This buoyed their spirits and gave them renewed strength and energy to walk the fifteen or so miles and somehow they managed to maneuver over the rough ice and landed at Cape Pine. The men who had made it to the Violette had been carried out to sea for about a hundred miles with the ship still frozen into the ice pan. The wind then changed back towards land and they drifted back to within about forty miles of the land. The hull of the Violette was sound as were he sails and rigging. She was however almost empty of provisions except for some rum and flour. At first the rum was a welcome sight but some of the wiser men in the party noticed that an attitude amongst some of the party to drown their sorrows, quietly allowed the rum to run overboard.
The predicament of the stranded men had been reported and made headlines in the local St. John’s newspapers. The reports were based on conflicting data and consequently the first reports were not accurate. They first reported that forty two men were trapped on the ice and twenty of them were dead. Later a revised number was given that included the men that had made it to the Violette. It now listed thirty four men. On March 5th a telegram to Sir Ambrose Shea from Salmonier St. Mary’s Bay was published in the St. John’s Public Ledger. It listed nineteen men as missing on board the Violette.
The government dispatched the H.M.S. Tiger to search for survivors. It also promised to provide assistance for the families of the men lost in the disaster. Rumors abounded and on March 9th one false rumor circulated that the Violette had been sighted and boarded. On March 16th the Public Ledger reported that there was still no news from the missing men including the fifteen who were supposed to be on the Violette. The paper also opinioned that all of those who had not made it to the Violette were likely lost. The next day however the paper stated that although there were many rumors and reports they were not substantiated and nothing would likely be known until the Violette was eventually located.
And then the brig Lady Mary arrived in St. John’s. On board were eight survivors from the group that had set out from the beach in St. Vincent’s to board the Violette. They were able to provide a first hand knowledge of some of the events of March 1st and subsequent developments. They said that twenty of them had made it to the Violette, the day after they left the beach in St. Vincent’s and had remained on board until they were rescued. They had suffered from hunger and cold and were on the point of giving up hope when on Thursday March 11th , a schooner, the S.S. Fogg on a voyage from St. John’s to the West Indies came upon the drifting ship. With some difficulty, the Fogg managed to get close enough to the Violette to take the men off who had been trapped on board since March 2nd.
When these survivors arrived on board the S.S. Fogg they were surprised and delighted to find that the group who had made it to Cape Pine had also been picked up by the Fogg on Saturday March 6th. The S.S. Fogg was later successful in contacting two inbound vessels and was able to transfer the rescued men to them. They were the Lady Mary and the Trusty.
The Lady Mary brought in the following men: Ed Nowlan, R Critch, Danny White, James Barry, Richard Connors, John Murray, Thomas Hines and John St. Croix.
The men on board the Trusty were: Michael Tobin, John Barry, Thomas Barry and James Murray.
The Trusty had been in trouble when she came in contact with the SS Fogg. She was short of both provisions and fuel. Captain Spense of the Fogg supplied the Trusty with food and the hull and the spars of the Violette were used to provide them with fuel. The Trusty had been bound for Harbour Grace in Conception Bay but because of the ice conditions she was unable to reach her destination and put into another port in Conception Bay.
The remaining ten survivors on the Fogg were transferred to an outbound vessel the S.S. Nuernberg which took them all the way to Baltimore, Maryland, USA. They arrived there on March 29th 1875. On April 29th 1875 the ten men were returned to St. John’s by the S.S. Newfoundland. These ten men were: Andrew Mooney, Thomas Mooney, William Reuben, Patrick Tobin, James Tobin, John Fewer, James Peddle, Thomas Dunn, Ben St. Croix and fourteen year old James Grace.
Of the thirty four men and boys who had set out to board the Violette, thirteen had either drowned or died from exposure. Those who died were: Michael Power, John Power, Michael Vail and his son, Patrick Dobbin, Michael Barry, Thomas Bowen and his son, George Rousell and his son, Pat Layden, James Grace and James Phelan.
The John Power who died in this disaster was my great grandfather and Michael Power was his son. A second younger son John who was my grandfather had been with the group on the beach in St. Vincent’s but was dissuaded from going with them to the Violette by his father and stayed to visit with an aunt in St. Vincent’s. This probably saved his life.
This March 1875 disaster was the worst single sea disaster to ever happen in the St. Mary’s – St. Vincent’s area."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 1:58 am 
Offline
Expert Member
Expert Member

Joined: Sat May 02, 2009 12:31 am
Posts: 718
"James Peddle, died November 20, 1904, at St. Mary's, cause - decline, Roman Catholic , age 76 years, born at St. Mary's, buried at St. Mary's."


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: My family
 Post Posted: Thu May 26, 2016 5:24 pm 
Offline
New Member
New Member

Joined: Sun May 15, 2016 6:49 pm
Posts: 3
Whilst researching my Grans Seggie tree I came across -in the A&S Herald BDM, a James Seggie who on 25 Apr 1924 married an Elizabeth Love.They later had a child-female,born 22 Oct 1926 Krugersdrop, Transvaal ,South Africa at the Presbyterian church Manse.Despite seaching Ayrshire records and S. African records,I did locate a will of James in S. A. but sadly I got no help due to lack of family data. I am still at a loss who these 2 were. I have not been able to link James to the large family in Saltcoats/Ardrosssan Seggies.Raise Street mostly,But recently found a branch of Seggies in Kirkcudbright,so Have not exhausted the search.However it is a puzzle I have not had much luck sorting.I have no idea who this Elizabeth Love is.Maybe it rings a bell with someone on this site?


Top 
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: My family
 Post Posted: Sun Oct 18, 2020 3:28 pm 
Offline
Experienced Member
Experienced Member

Joined: Sat Jun 06, 2009 10:05 pm
Posts: 294
Ed, I have a Margaret Peddle married Thomas Lee, in the Riverhead area, St. Mary's District but they would not have been of your grandfather's age. I don't have dates right now on Thomas & Margaret (likely born in 1820's) but they had 3 children (that I know of):
Sara Lee, bp 26 Apr 1848, married Richard Power
Joseph Lee, bp 25 Aug 1851 - died 28 Jun 1899, married 22 May 1874 Mary Howlett
John Lee, bp 9 May 1853, m1 Johannah Walsh, m2 Mary Harvey

Hope this helps!
Last bumped by edwardpeddle on Sun Oct 18, 2020 3:28 pm.

Top 
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
 
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ] 

Board index » Genealogy » Genealogy Hints & Tips


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

 
 

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
cron