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 Post subject: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 1:41 am 
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For any dedicated amateur genetic genealogist or family historian interested in exploring their AncestryDNA, 23andMe or FTDNA 700,000 SNP atDNA further with more in-depth precision and higher resolution, I would personally recommend exploiting the option of uploading or transfering one's raw data file to DNA Tribes.

The procedure is simple:

Step 1:

Go to DNA Tribes website:

http://www.dnatribes.com/

Step 2:

Click on FAQ icon:

http://www.dnatribes.com/faq.php

Step 3:

Under Frequently Asked Questions..... Go to:

This FAQ pertains to our STR test. For information on our SNP analysis, click here

...and click on click here.

http://dnatribes-snp.com/

From there the interested consumer can follow the website purchasing instructions.

Here is an extract excerpted from the official website detailing the database coverage:

“DNA Tribes® analysis identifies the peoples and places where your geographical genetic ancestry is most strongly represented. DNA Tribes is the only personal genetic analysis that compares your genetic profile to a population database that includes over 560,000 individuals from 1,200+ populations around the world, including 950+ indigenous populations”.

IMHO DNA Tribes gives a more detailed and wider coverage of reference poplulations than FTDNA, National Genographic, 23andMe, and AncestryDNA. Taking the NA (Native American) (North Amerindian) as but one example, as far as I know, based on current research anyways, FTDNA & Nat Geno uses the following Central American reference populations Karitiana (Brazil), Pima-Papago (Mexico) & Surui (Brazil) as proxies to test and/or calculate North Amerindian ancestry. However, DNA Tribes (exclusive of a large Central & South Amerindian reference population database) uses the following North (American) Amerindian reference populations:

Anishinaabeg (Chippewa/Ojibwe) (Ontario, Canada) (125)
Anishinaabeg (Chippewa/Ojibwe) (Ontario, Canada) (128)
Athabaskan (Alaska) (101)
Coastal Salish (British Columbia, Canada) (93)
Coastal Salish (British Columbia, Canada) (103)
Cree (Kenistenoag) (Saskatchewan, Canada) (79)
Cree (Kenistenoag) (Saskatchewan, Canada) (104)
Dogrib (Northwest Territories, Canada) (98)
Greenland (194)
Greenland (505)
Greenland (Aasiaat) (26)
Greenland (Ammassalik) (76)
Greenland (Ilulissat) (54)
Greenland (Maniitsoq) (51)
Greenland (Nanortalik) (25)
Greenland (Narsaq) (18)
Greenland (Nuuk) (56)
Greenland (Paamiut) (17)
Greenland (Qaqortoq) (27)
Greenland (Qasigiannguit) (18)
Greenland (Qeqertarsuaq) (10)
Greenland (Sisimiut) (81)
Greenland (Upernavik) (18)
Greenland (Uummannaq) (17)
Inuit (Inupiat) (Alaska) (109)
Navajo (Dineh) (Southwestern U.S.) (182)
Sioux and Chippewa (Minnesota, U.S.A.) (200)
Sioux and Chippewa (Minnesota, U.S.A.) (100)
Sioux and Chippewa (Minnesota, U.S.A.) (203)

(http://www.dnatribes.com/pops-amer.php)

Anecdotally, Lab Mont-Nask (Eastern Cree) should be close to Cree (Kenistenoag) (Saskatchewan, Canada), as it forms an eastern domain of the Cree dialect continuum.

Postscript: I found this on-line direct-to-consumer very helpful and informative. IMHO it gives way more detail and coverage than the competing commercial genetic genealogy testing companies on the market. If the customer is into detecting low-level substrate residues such as NA-EA going back 6-8 Gens down to the 0.1% biogeographic ethnic origin precentage from ethnic minorities that other testing companies fail to post due to 1.0-2.0% threshhold limits or caps, this is the company for you. Note that the 26-28 page report is detailed and heavy reading, tailored to the dedicated enthusiast seeking deep ancestral relations-it is not for the "faint of heart"!

As a final note, I am very happy with the final test results that shows 1.2% combined NA-Siberian-SAsian for my biological mother. This testing ends app. 20 years of paper trail family history-genealogy and app. 10 years of exploratory commercial genetic genealogy research. Personally, I will not be purchaing any more direct-to-consumer commercial genetic genealogy products. However, I highly recommend DNA Tribes for the committed and "die hard" genetic genealogist-it was worth the money. I hope this helps anyone else interested in going a little deeper than the atDNA testing products currently available on the market.

Thanks

Sincerely,
DP


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 Post subject: Re: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 11:28 pm 
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Thanks Pikeman,
I am just entering into an exploration of my possible Amerindian ancestry. I have raw data from ancestrydna I've uploaded to gedmatch. No native American on ancestry results, but gedmatch shows 0.52% Arctic Amerind in MDLP World-22. Eurogenes gave me 0.39% Amerindian. My great-grandmother (father's grandmother) was rumored to have native blood. She was from Port Blandford/Keels area.
My aunt (father's sister) is showing almost double my results in same gedmatch calculators. Do you know of any reference populations from Bonavista?
Thanks for sharing all your knowledge even though a lot of it goes over my head!

Stephen Baker


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 Post subject: Re: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Thu Oct 26, 2017 4:01 pm 
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I'm not surpised that Ancestry DNA does not show NA ancestry, while keeping in mind that this atDNA test only targets app. 700,000 SNPs. out of app. 10,000,000+ in the human genome. Plus, Ancestry DNA like FTDNA and National Genographic Project 2.0 all use Karitiana and Surui (and Pima-Papago for Nat Geo & FTDNA), all South-Central American NA reference poplulations. Unlike the aforemnetioned testing companies DNATribes uses North Amercian NA reference populations in their panel or array, such as Saulteauw and Ojibway (Central Algonquian groups). I am not surprised the Siberian or NA shows up in some of yoru GedMatch test results. My advice to you is to transfer your Ancestry DNA V3 raw data files to DNATribes. To answer your question about reference poplulations in Bonavista Bay as far as I know none of the current commercial genetic genealogy testing companies use any Eastern Algonquian (NL-NS-NB-Que Mc, Abenaki, Mal-Passamaquoddy), Newfoundland Red Indian (Beothuk) or Labrador Inuit or Innuat-Innuts (Mont-Nask) in their reference poplulations. However, the Beothuk Institute in liaison with MUn Genetics and McMaster University Ancient DNA Center, are applying for SSHRC funding to undertake a 3 year interdiscplinary research study or project to analyze the whole genomes (atDNA) of 19 Beothuk and Maritime Archaic Indian genome sequences. From there these aDNA test results will be compared to living NL Mi'kmaq, Lab Inuit, and Lab Innuat-Innuts groups. So lots of interesting research findings coming down the pipeline in the coming 3-5 years. One can expect the BI (Beothuk Institute) to start offering to the general public a DNA kit to interested consumers throughout NL and elsewhere for a nominal fee to determine if any test participant carries any rare atDNA mutation markers. So don't be discouraged with the recent AncestryDNA test results its to be expected given the low threshold limit of app. 1.0% and the South-Central American NA reference populations. It is logical and inevitable that NL Eastern Algonquian, Beothuk and Lab Central Algonquian groups will have different atDNA mutation markers due to natural evolutionary mutation rates per each generation resulting from geographic and genetioc isolation. Interesting times on the horizon with adavnces in whole genome sequencing! Hope this answers your question, and thank you for sharing your family history-genetic genealogy information.
Sincerely,
Pikeman


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 Post subject: Re: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Thu Oct 26, 2017 11:15 pm 
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Thanks Pikeman,
That is certainly something to look forward to! Just curious, do you know if Saulteauw and Ojibway are known to share sequences with NA found in Newfoundland? I am seriously considering submitting to DNA Tribes. Do you know if one can upload more than one person's raw data? I'd like to submit both mine and my aunt's for analysis.
Thanks again!
Steve

add: Were the 19 Beothuk and Maritime Archaic Indian genome sequences extracted from skeletal remains?


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 Post subject: Re: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 11:59 am 
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I am sure that Saulteaux and Ojibway as Central Algonquian groups do indeed share atDNA with NL NA groups. But as a side note NL NA groups such as Beothuk (now extinct) and NL Mc (Ktaqmkukewaq) will have unique atDNA markers resulting from relative isolation or geographic separation. Some lay men researchers speculate that one cannot determine tribal affiliation or derivation based on atDNA. However, that's not the complete story of what's actually going on with mutation events in the whole genome. It has been proven now that atDNA mutation events occur at a calculated frequency of app. 35-70 SNP mutations per Gen (every 25-30 years). So looking at a group like NL Red Indian or Beothuk, for instance, who according to archaeological surveys are believed to have resided in NL for app. 1500 years descending from the Little Passage Complex, there should be app. 2,200-4,200 SNPs (1500 years divided by 25-30 years per Gen x 70 mutation per Gen) unique to the Beothuk-or in essence Beo tribal markers! Some genetic genealogists and laymen researchers underestimate the power of whole genome sequencing to detect rare mutation events, partly from the lack of information available in the public domain. Even if we take into consideration the fact, according to NL Mc oral traditions, reconstructed archival & circumstantial evidence, that some NL Mc kin groups intermarried with Red Indian Lake Beo kin groups in the post contact period namely 1540-1670 (or later) with a 50.0% intermarriage frequency rate between both kin groups, that still leaves app. 1,100-2,100 SNPs unique to the Beothuk. According to the recent ancient mtDNA Beo-MAI study the mtDNA sequences of the Beo, perhaps with the exception of some mtDNA X2a...clades or haplotypes are unique to the Beothuk, so the emerging YDNA SNP and mtDNA reconstructed sequences are confirming an emerging pattern which points in one direction which is in accord with linguistic, ethnographic and archaeological research-the Beothuk were a distinct peripheral NA group that seems to have been isolated genetically and geographically for quite some time. As an answer to the postscript, only mtDNA haplotypes were sequenced not atDNA (22 recombining chromosomal DNA plus xDNA). As far as I know, while McMaster University Ancient DNA Centre & MUN Genetics are applying for 3 year SSHRC funding for a large scale comparative whole genome atDNA study to be completed some NL Mc families have already had whole genome sequenced sampled, amplified and sequenced for analysis-and yes some mutation markers outside NL-NS Mc have been found which match up with the Beothuk samples-so a clearer picture is indeed emerging, namely some NL Mc kin groups, and I suspect some NL Ango-Irish families with a suspected distant uniparental Beo ancestor going back to ca. 1780-1820, have a Beo connection. Whole genome sequencing which tests all the 10,000,000 plus SNPs in the human genome does indeed detect ancient or deep ancestry going back to 8-9+ Gens-so higher resolution and precision than the conventional 700,000SNPs available through commercial genetic genealogy testing companies. I sincerely believe that you should take the DNA Tribes atDNA test (49.99 Cdn) for Ancestry DNA raw data transfer. I hope you find your results as interesting an informative as I did. I would not be surprised that many NL Anglo-Irish families emanating from the NDB, Exploits, Bonavista Bay, Trinity, TB North and Brigus-Cupids, CBN areas of settlement have NA atDNA biogeographic ethnic origin percentage ranges in the order of app. 0.5-1.5% NA (whether NL Mc, Lab Montagnais, or even NL Beothuk). Continued aDNA testing and time will tell!


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 Post subject: Re: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 11:08 pm 
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Pikeman wrote:
-the Beothuk were a distinct peripheral NA group that seems to have been isolated genetically and geographically for quite some time.


Very interesting. I would assume, in terms of genetic markers, isolated gene pools would be desirable in that containment within that specific gene pool would show up more prominently. Targeting sequences would therefore be very specific to that population. I am subscribing to DNA Tribes. Thanks for the wealth of info. I'll be in touch!


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 Post subject: Re: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Sat Oct 28, 2017 1:54 am 
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I am more than glad to assist in any way. DNATribes is a good foundational starting point, but the real deal in answering the big questions will come with the upcoming whole genome aDNA studies coming down the pipeline in the next 3-4 years. It will be interesting to see if the BI & McMaster University share the genomes with other commercial genetic genealogy testing companies and Gedmatch to use in their reference population databases or if they hold exclusive proprietary rights to the reconstructed genome sequences and offer a test kit to the general public at a nominal fee! Either way the dedicated researcher and interested lay man should expect this service in the near future after the paper publication in 3-4 years-so around 4-5 years from now or 2021-2022. Either way, the results should be interesting. I agree with your interpretation of the proposal that the Beothuk were in all probability a divergent early branch of Algonquian people that were relatively isolated genetically. Hope you find the DNATribes test results informative.

Sincerely,
Pikeman


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 Post subject: Re: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 3:02 pm 
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Do you know if it is compatible with that new v5 chip from 23andme? We did 23andme first, we just sent off our Ancestry.com dna tests since that one seems to the universally accepted dna that we can upload just about anywhere.

My husband show 10-15% in the Native American/Northern American Indian composition in 23andme as well as when we uploaded it to the Gedcom Genesis database.

My husband's mother was adopted, so we know nothing of her background, however, he's gotten matches to family members in 23andme that lead me to believe it will lead back to Canada.

There are stories in my family of Algonquin bloodlines, but I have yet to establish them through exhaustive research. What I have found is ancestors in the first founders of Quebec, Massachusetts, as well as ancestors in Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.

My 23andme shows 0.2% Native American and East Asian, Gedcom Genesis showed slightly more depending on which of the reports I looked at.


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 Post subject: Re: DNA Tribes atDNA Testing
 Post Posted: Sat Nov 04, 2017 3:21 pm 
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Yes as far as I know 23andMe raw data files are transferable to DNATribes. Interesting family history and DNA test results!


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